what are some essential first mods? - Yamaha R3 Forum
User Tag List

 30Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
post #1 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 10:17 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: hayward, CA
Posts: 55
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Question what are some essential first mods?

i have an extra $550 and was just wonder what are some first mods i should do to the bike. if you guys could help out with suggestions that would be great also leave a link to the parts if you can
nick is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 11:42 AM
Member
 
ahakanc90's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Western Massachusetts
Posts: 85
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
fender eliminator for sure! I got a yoshimura one waiting to be installed, but there are also other options.

http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/y...yamaha-r3-2015
http://www.gravesport.com/Graves-Mot...nator-Kit.html
http://www.vagabondmotorsports.com/p...der-eliminator
nick likes this.
ahakanc90 is offline  
post #3 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 12:41 PM
r3-forums.com Vendor
 
jbluetooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 609
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
I'm curious to see what others recommend. My thought process comes from track riding, which goes something like this:

First Priority, controls, ergonomics, safety guards:
-adjust stock suspension to suit rider
-adjust or replace levers to suit rider
-adjust or replace clip-ons to suit rider
-adjust or replace rearsets to suit rider
-SS or kevlar front brake lines
-replace front brake pads if the stock ones suck, they usually suck
-add stomp grips
-woodcraft shark guard
-case covers
-fuel tank guards if necessary for your bike
-radiator guard
-fiberglass bodywork
-proper riding gear
(I don't believe in frame sliders for track riding, I think they cause more harm than good on the race track)

Second Priority, handling:
-replace tires with appropriate
-suspension upgrades, depends on the bike, but usually fork cartridges or cartridge emulators first, then shock upgrade second

Third Priority, more power:
-modified or aftermarket shorter throttle throw
-change chain size and gear ratio
-full exhaust, air filter, fuel controller (these go together, no point doing one without the others)

Extras if you have the money, put them in anywhere after the first priority stuff is done:
-ECU flash
-quickshifter
-traction control
-slipper clutch
-aftermarket wheels, magnesium, carbon, etc.
-lighter battery
-engine build
-windtunnel tested helmet like Shoie, Arai or one of the other quality ones out now, these are generally >$300

I guess for street riding, the only differences might be that you don't need fiberglass bodywork, a slipon exhaust may be enough, you might want to change cosmetics like integrated taillight or undertail from hotbodies, different turn signals, and I HIGHLY recommend HID headlights so you can actually see and be seen at night. Frame sliders on the street are up to you, I don't recommend them on the track.

Cheers,
Jesse


Follow my build and racing at
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

The most complete resource for information and race parts for the Yamaha R3.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
jbluetooth is offline  
 
post #4 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 12:51 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: hayward, CA
Posts: 55
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahakanc90 View Post
fender eliminator for sure! I got a yoshimura one waiting to be installed, but there are also other options.

http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/y...yamaha-r3-2015
http://www.gravesport.com/Graves-Mot...nator-Kit.html
http://www.vagabondmotorsports.com/p...der-eliminator
yeah i was thinking fender eliminator. idk about spending 100 on just a little plate lol. i guess it does look nice compared to the others but i might just end up going with the vagabond one. thanks for the links!
VagabondMS likes this.
nick is offline  
post #5 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 01:09 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
nick's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: hayward, CA
Posts: 55
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbluetooth View Post
I'm curious to see what others recommend. My thought process comes from track riding, which goes something like this:

First Priority, controls, ergonomics, safety guards:
-adjust stock suspension to suit rider
-adjust or replace levers to suit rider
-adjust or replace clip-ons to suit rider
-adjust or replace rearsets to suit rider
-SS or kevlar front brake lines
-replace front brake pads if the stock ones suck, they usually suck
-add stomp grips
-woodcraft shark guard
-case covers
-fuel tank guards if necessary for your bike
-radiator guard
-fiberglass bodywork
-proper riding gear
(I don't believe in frame sliders for track riding, I think they cause more harm than good on the race track)

Second Priority, handling:
-replace tires with appropriate
-suspension upgrades, depends on the bike, but usually fork cartridges or cartridge emulators first, then shock upgrade second

Third Priority, more power:
-modified or aftermarket shorter throttle throw
-change chain size and gear ratio
-full exhaust, air filter, fuel controller (these go together, no point doing one without the others)

Extras if you have the money, put them in anywhere after the first priority stuff is done:
-ECU flash
-quickshifter
-traction control
-slipper clutch
-aftermarket wheels, magnesium, carbon, etc.
-lighter battery
-engine build
-windtunnel tested helmet like Shoie, Arai or one of the other quality ones out now, these are generally >$300

I guess for street riding, the only differences might be that you don't need fiberglass bodywork, a slipon exhaust may be enough, you might want to change cosmetics like integrated taillight or undertail from hotbodies, different turn signals, and I HIGHLY recommend HID headlights so you can actually see and be seen at night. Frame sliders on the street are up to you, I don't recommend them on the track.
this is alot of useful information to save for later i appreciate it. i wont be hitting the track anytime soon maybe in about a year or so when i get more seat time and more comfortable with the bike hahaha. so are the stock levers, shocks, rear sets, and clip ons adjustable or do i need to get aftermarket ones to adjust them?
nick is offline  
post #6 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 01:25 PM
r3-forums.com Vendor
 
jbluetooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 609
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nick View Post
this is alot of useful information to save for later i appreciate it. i wont be hitting the track anytime soon maybe in about a year or so when i get more seat time and more comfortable with the bike hahaha. so are the stock levers, shocks, rear sets, and clip ons adjustable or do i need to get aftermarket ones to adjust them?
Unfortunately the stock levers and rearsets are not adjustable on the R3. You'll probably be ok with the levers as long as the brake is in a comfortable position for you. The rearset position is also less important on a bike like the R3 because it doesn't have the dramatic weight transfer of a more powerful bike. With a bigger bike, it's critital to position the rearsets where you can support your weight primarily with your legs during acceleration and deceleration. Too far back causes your weight to fall too heavily on your arms during braking and cornering, too far forward causes you to have to hang on too tight with your hands during acceleration. Height should be adjusted so you can grip the tank firmly with your knee while braking and cornering, and this will usually give you better ground clearance as well.

The shock can only be adjusted for preload, but be sure to adjust it to your weight. If your goal is to progress as a rider and eventually go to the track, then adjustable rearsets like the ones made by Vortex and some of the ones made by Gilles and Woodcraft will allow you to position the pegs exactly where they feel best to you and where you feel the most controlled and stable while riding. This stability will relax you and give you confidence, and with confidence comes speed and safety.

The stock clipons are very upright for comfort and stability for new riders riding around town. If you want to ride the R3 aggressively, eventually on the track, you will also likely want to change the clipon position, either by moving the stock ones below the triple clamp, or replacing them with aftermarket ones, again Woodcraft and Vortex make great clipons. I'll be testing the Vortex ones here pretty soon to see which ones fit the best on the R3 since they make 2 styles.

Cheers,
Jesse


Follow my build and racing at
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

The most complete resource for information and race parts for the Yamaha R3.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
jbluetooth is offline  
post #7 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 02:20 PM
Member
 
Evotion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Woking, Surrey, UK
Posts: 92
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Interesting..
The ONLY thing I would do with the R3 is stick a louder pipe on it to give it more character.
I thought it was a pretty good bike off the shelf.

I;d rather leave it stock and save the money instead to get an older R6, etc, to track or chuck around with abandon.

WhichBike.com

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Evotion is offline  
post #8 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 04:49 PM
Member
 
Piperman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
I haven't been able to find any levers or rearsets from Vortex or Woodcraft for this bike. Nor much of anything else that I am looking for, I bought this bike for track riding.
Need to find some brakelines and grips.

Why don't you like frame sliders on the track?
I'm curious for the reasoning, probably something that I haven't thought of.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jbluetooth View Post
I'm curious to see what others recommend. My thought process comes from track riding, which goes something like this:

First Priority, controls, ergonomics, safety guards:
-adjust stock suspension to suit rider
-adjust or replace levers to suit rider
-adjust or replace clip-ons to suit rider
-adjust or replace rearsets to suit rider
-SS or kevlar front brake lines
-replace front brake pads if the stock ones suck, they usually suck
-add stomp grips
-woodcraft shark guard
-case covers
-fuel tank guards if necessary for your bike
-radiator guard
-fiberglass bodywork
-proper riding gear
(I don't believe in frame sliders for track riding, I think they cause more harm than good on the race track)

Second Priority, handling:
-replace tires with appropriate
-suspension upgrades, depends on the bike, but usually fork cartridges or cartridge emulators first, then shock upgrade second

Third Priority, more power:
-modified or aftermarket shorter throttle throw
-change chain size and gear ratio
-full exhaust, air filter, fuel controller (these go together, no point doing one without the others)

Extras if you have the money, put them in anywhere after the first priority stuff is done:
-ECU flash
-quickshifter
-traction control
-slipper clutch
-aftermarket wheels, magnesium, carbon, etc.
-lighter battery
-engine build
-windtunnel tested helmet like Shoie, Arai or one of the other quality ones out now, these are generally >$300

I guess for street riding, the only differences might be that you don't need fiberglass bodywork, a slipon exhaust may be enough, you might want to change cosmetics like integrated taillight or undertail from hotbodies, different turn signals, and I HIGHLY recommend HID headlights so you can actually see and be seen at night. Frame sliders on the street are up to you, I don't recommend them on the track.

2015 Yamaha R3 Blue/Silver
2015 BMW K1300S Motorsport
2016 BMW R1200RS Granite
Piperman is offline  
post #9 of 59 Old 05-16-2015, 06:41 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by nick View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahakanc90 View Post
fender eliminator for sure! I got a yoshimura one waiting to be installed, but there are also other options.

http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/y...yamaha-r3-2015
http://www.gravesport.com/Graves-Mot...nator-Kit.html
http://www.vagabondmotorsports.com/p...der-eliminator
yeah i was thinking fender eliminator. idk about spending 100 on just a little plate lol. i guess it does look nice compared to the others but i might just end up going with the vagabond one. thanks for the links!
I just put the vagabond eliminator on mine. It installed easily and looks 10 times better than the giant plastic stock fender. I'd say without a doubt that for $69 there is no other mod that will dramatically improve the look of your bike like this one. Simple and cheap. leaves you the option of adding led signals later if you choose to.

I might order the rear seat cowl from Yamaha as well. Nice because the paint is matched.


Like to get adjustable shorty levers someday but no rush. By next year there will be tons of aftermarket parts on the market.
nick likes this.
warlok9 is offline  
post #10 of 59 Old 05-17-2015, 10:41 AM
Member
 
87112's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 93
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
I thought about the Fender eliminator but after looking at it some more its not that bad to me. The rear completely gone with a FE seems almost too empty there.
I am going to put some radical tires on the bike soon, if it buys me 20% better traction on the curves and better braking its worth it for the safety part.
I got these http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/s...-880-881-tires
I trusted Shinko because of the reviews, I can't believe so many people can be wrong about Shinko tires, they really do get good reviews and the price is only 42 dollars more than the cheapest bias tire I could find for the set which were the Duro H918. If anyone in Seattle wants to buy my Pilot streets tires let me know.
87112 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Yamaha R3 Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



  Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Performance Mods for YZF-R3 fredd Yamaha R3 Garage & Build Area 23 08-07-2015 12:28 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off