New R3 owner, new to bikes, what do I need to know and do 1st? - Yamaha R3 Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 02:14 AM Thread Starter
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New R3 owner, new to bikes, what do I need to know and do 1st?

Hello, im 31 and just brought the R3 as my 1st bike. I have never rode anything on two wheels besides a bicycle. I am looking to get into an msf course within the next few weeks when I find 1 that isn't full and fits my schedule.

In the mean time I want to start in some parking lots to get comfortable with some of the basic mechanics. Problem is the dealer I brought it from delivered it (reasonably for free) but didn't give me an overview of the bike or go over much with me knowing it was my 1st.
Question is before I jump on what should I do first, maintenance wise or anything. So far I have my gear and a basic understanding of how to get moving based on youtube videos and what ive read in the manual. I know about the 600 mile check up but didn't really have it expalined to me very well.
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post #2 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 03:47 AM
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Read the owners manual, cover to cover, and backwards again.
Get your Learners permit organised.


Don't dream of riding your brand new expensive dangerous thing until you've booked lessons with your local qualified instructor.
they are the folk that guide you to get your license, and try to reduce risk of injury heartache, expense and death.


I'd go buy a $1500 125-250cc or use the instructors bike. for a few months.






Enjoy the journey.
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post #3 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 04:09 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the reply. I guess I left out I've had my temp permit for awhile.
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post #4 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 05:09 AM
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Parking lots are great for getting a feel for the machine. Practice stopping at a quicker and quicker rate - most new rider 'mishaps' are due to unexpected stops, so get comfortable with your braking skills. Most of your stopping power is in the front, so work on that. MSF course for sure. I'm a proponent of track day instruction if you can do that - best place to learn reaction and handling skills without having to deal with traffic. Don't skimp on gear - money well spent in the long run.

Maintenance and related info is on the "Tech" section of the board - you may have to wade through a lot of extraneous posts, but a lot of good info there. For the first couple of hundred miles, maintenance is minimal - check tire pressure, typically about 30 front, 32 rear - bikes are more sensitive to too high or too low than cars. As @Aufitt says, most basic items are in the Owner's Manual.

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post #5 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 08:39 AM
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Hardest part is the clutch engagement with the proper throttle amount of gas. Nothing is more scary than a motorcycle rear wheeling away on you. It happened to me when I was 16 and at an intersection of all places.
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post #6 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 02:14 PM
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I'm always amazed and envious of you crazy people who have that much balls to buy a brand-spanking new motorcycle with absolutely no riding experience whatsoever, no training, nothing. Not even coaching up by a friend.

You should be both applauded for your balls and reprimanded for your senselessness.

Do you have any friends or acquaintances that ride? If so, have them come over and show you some beginner ropes.

If not, well, you can either wait and drool over your new ride parked in your residence while you finally take the MSF course. It would honestly be worth it. But if not, ask yourself if you are really going to ride it over to a vacant parking lot to practice when getting there is what counts? Can you ride it around your quiet neighborhood? That's similar to parking lot riding save for the cars and peds running around...

Some slow speed tips for the complete newbie:

Clutch control. That is probably one of the most important things to learn right now. If you are riding really slow, doing slow speed things, you need to have the clutch at the partially engaged spot (and not fully engaged-where you completely release the clutch, so you are holding the clutch halfway in) while you have the throttle gently rolling.

Always brake to a complete stop with your tire straight.

Don't lock the steering wheel while doing U-turns. Locking the steering means turning the steering until it comes to a stop. Always clutch control on a U turn.
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post #7 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 04:04 PM Thread Starter
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Well im scheduled for the msf on 4/20. I do live in a pretty quiet neighborhood but to get to the parking lot ill have to ride through the entire neighborhood and cross 1 semi busy street. Im tempted to just walk it the entire length. Or I could just have my wife hide the keys from me until I take the course as I torture myself pulling into the garage from work everyday having to look at this lonely sexy thing starring back at me asking me why wont I ride her.
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post #8 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EazyE View Post
Or I could just have my wife hide the keys from me until I take the course..
Best thing I have read in this thread... Seriously!


Good luck,


Ride Safe!
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Gear Up & Ride Safe!
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post #9 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 05:26 PM
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Originally Posted by EazyE View Post
Im tempted to just walk it the entire length.
I think trying to walk it for any long distance is a really bad idea, esp if you're trying to do it in traffic.

The R3 is light compared to other motorcycles, but you'll find that wheeling an almost-400lb machine is nothing like playing with a bicycle.

If you're tall enough to flat foot the bike when sitting on it, then you can duck-walk it for short distances. That way you can control both sides if it leans over.

Otherwise always push your bike standing on the left side, with it leaned a tiny bit towards you so that you can catch it. Be ready to have the kickstand deployed. Once it tilts too far to the right side, no way anyone's strong enough to catch it.

We've all shared your newbie enthusiasm at some point along the way. Just ask yourself how ready are you to destroy your new $5000 toy by rushing into things, not to mention the potential of serious bodily harm...
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post #10 of 26 Old 04-02-2016, 07:28 PM
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You have any friends or family who ride? Hook up with them, and they can get you started. They can ride your bike to a parking lot, and you take your car.
Once there, they can show you what you need to know, and you can practice. It's good to practice by yourself in a large empty parking lot. You need to learn "slow-speed control" first. Gratz on the new bike. Ride safe.

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