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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!

Let me introduce myself first of all. I'm Max, a university student and 20 years old, living in the UK.

Just wanted some advice and questions answered.

I am looking to purchase/obtain my A2 license (maximum I can retrieve in the UK at this age) this summer. This will be my first license and I will do it all at one time. I have had previous riding experience riding motocross bikes etc (i know it's a lot different when driving on the road legally). Considering purchasing the 2016 R3 in Matte Grey on PCP after. Always wanted a road bike for when i reached the age but never saw the point in a moped or a 125 and therefore went straight into a car which i've had now for 3 years (3 years no claims too ;)) so i thought why not start at the 300cc category.

First of all, first impressions? Will this be a great bike to start out on, good fuel economy etc?

I will be mostly using the bike to commute to university (2 miles or so) and my trips back home every 2-3 weekends + of course continuous use while back for the holidays.

Second question, what's it like owning a bike in the UK? Im not one to moan about a bit of cold weather and I tend to prefer colder environments to warmer. Is it worth getting the bike (really want to build up a riding experience before I can move onto something slightly bigger). I'll end up walking to uni when the weather's **** any way so either way I'm not hugely fussed.

Any other info/recommendations on bikes or the R3 specifically then shoot a reply below.

Thanks for reading and good to meet you all! :D

- Max
 

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Read the countless articles and review videos on youtube... The information is already out there, I promise.

Want a better way of forming your opinion? Go for a test ride once you get your license.

As for riding in the UK, or anywhere for that matter, that's a personal opinion. The heat index on the way home from work today was 114F, I'll also ride with the temps down in the low 30s. If you enjoy riding enough, you'll find a way to make it work.

If you have done any reading, you'd know that 300s are wonderful beginner bikes for many different reasons. They also are tons of fun for experienced riders alike and offer a practical form of transportation for those who don't want 200rwhp sitting under them just to go from stop light to stop light.

My recommendation would be to purchased used since this is your first bike. No sense in purchasing new if you know you're just going to sell it down the road. Just my .02
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Read the countless articles and review videos on youtube... The information is already out there, I promise.

Want a better way of forming your opinion? Go for a test ride once you get your license.

As for riding in the UK, or anywhere for that matter, that's a personal opinion. The heat index on the way home from work today was 114F, I'll also ride with the temps down in the low 30s. If you enjoy riding enough, you'll find a way to make it work.

If you have done any reading, you'd know that 300s are wonderful beginner bikes for many different reasons. They also are tons of fun for experienced riders alike and offer a practical form of transportation for those who don't want 200rwhp sitting under them just to go from stop light to stop light.

My recommendation would be to purchased used since this is your first bike. No sense in purchasing new if you know you're just going to sell it down the road. Just my .02
Hey thanks! I've done non stop reading/youtube watching but wanted a real perspective. You've given me a decent insight, thank you!

I would purchase used but the finance option Yamaha offers is brilliant, I can't afford to buy the bike straight up as I don't have that kind of cash laying around, i guess a lot of people don't. I'll look into financing a used one as that may be a better option.
 

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Hey thanks! I've done non stop reading/youtube watching but wanted a real perspective. You've given me a decent insight, thank you!

I would purchase used but the finance option Yamaha offers is brilliant, I can't afford to buy the bike straight up as I don't have that kind of cash laying around, i guess a lot of people don't. I'll look into financing a used one as that may be a better option.
It all depends on what you can find also, the best bang for your buck very well may be new after all. If I were to do it all over again, I would have kept my 300, spent 2-3 years paying it off, then buy a second bike of my liking. Here I am years later working my way back down to a 300 because I miss it :D

Bottom line, don't over think it. Whatever you decide to go with, whether it be a 300 or a completely different style/class motorcycle, you're not going to go wrong. As soon as you start riding you're going to to realize what it's all about. If you become a true addict like myself, you'll want one of each. Just pick up an R3 new or not, and ride. Until you get your license and do that, you're just wasting time ;)
 

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:eek:

Are you crazy ?!?!? 65f to 85f or the bike stays PARKED! 0:)
And that's with my air cooled vtwin :D

I'm originally from east texas where it is VERY humid. Step outside and you'll immediately become drenched with sweat... Here in south texas? This is by far the driest heat I've ever felt. I really don't mind it! I hope to make my way out west to new mexico, arizona, utah, and california.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It all depends on what you can find also, the best bang for your buck very well may be new after all. If I were to do it all over again, I would have kept my 300, spent 2-3 years paying it off, then buy a second bike of my liking. Here I am years later working my way back down to a 300 because I miss it :D

Bottom line, don't over think it. Whatever you decide to go with, whether it be a 300 or a completely different style/class motorcycle, you're not going to go wrong. As soon as you start riding you're going to to realize what it's all about. If you become a true addict like myself, you'll want one of each. Just pick up an R3 new or not, and ride. Until you get your license and do that, you're just wasting time ;)
Seems like certainly for the UK my best option is finance a new one then trade it in for a bigger bike after 3 years or trade it in and have nothing else to pay :). I think that's what i'll do, getting a loan at this age proves difficult and the monthly repayments are significantly more then what Yamaha themselves offer. Thanks for the info bud.
 

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From the title of your thread I thought maybe you were a time traveler. The R3 would be a great bike for you. Plenty of power and will not force you to move bigger later on cause it is just that much fun.
 

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imo if the MT03 is out where you live, you should start on that.

I have a soft spot for nakeds, mainly for their city maneuver handling. As someone who commuted to Uni (college here for the US folks) with my first bike, a naked, I am so glad I did so because of how well they ride at slow speeds. City riding is a pain on a faired sport bike with clipons. But yes, you do get used to it, but having ridden and owned nakeds and supersports, I will take a naked in city stop and go any day all day. But if you plan on riding twistys and leaning hard more often than not, then go for the R3.

That's my 2 cents. Or quids. Or...or.. *runs away*
 

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imo if the MT03 is out where you live, you should start on that.

I have a soft spot for nakeds, mainly for their city maneuver handling. As someone who commuted to Uni (college here for the US folks) with my first bike, a naked, I am so glad I did so because of how well they ride at slow speeds. City riding is a pain on a faired sport bike with clipons. But yes, you do get used to it, but having ridden and owned nakeds and supersports, I will take a naked in city stop and go any day all day. But if you plan on riding twistys and leaning hard more often than not, then go for the R3.

That's my 2 cents. Or quids. Or...or.. *runs away*
I would agree with you on super sport bikes like the R6 or R1, but with the seating position of the R3 commuting is a breeze. I would venture to say that the difference in seating position between the MT03 and the R3 is probably negligible.
 

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I would agree with you on super sport bikes like the R6 or R1, but with the seating position of the R3 commuting is a breeze. I would venture to say that the difference in seating position between the MT03 and the R3 is probably negligible.
It isn't the seating posture I take issue with. Super nakeds (which is what I ride nowadays) have far more aggressive seat posture than the R3. Its the actual low speed steering. Where you need to fight with the bike to keep up (or how the steering wants to keep turning until lock) when you turn the steering at sub 5mph speeds. Even super nakeds have far better low speed handling than an R3. Its hard to explain if you haven't ridden say a motard or a sv650 or CB300/500F and the like. Those things are sooooo easy to ride slowly it isn't funny.
 

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One wonders if they will repeat the success of the past or if the FZ/MT07 took its throne already and its too late.
I think it will appeal to the more experienced crowd. Yamaha definitely has the 1 up on style. Newer riders will still flock towards the 07 IMO... If Suzuki threw out an SV650S with the front fairing again, I'd jump in a heartbeat.
 

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This wonderful machine is great. It is my first real bike and i learned to ride pretty quickly on this one. However, i am a fast learner, and i have ridden dirt bikes in the past, but it is a good overall bike. Happy riding!
 

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@ 90six

Hi Max! I'd go to a dealer and ask for a test ride as that's the ONLY way to really check out a bike (reviews are nice but only YOU know what you like)

also I'd buy used since it's your 1st bike most likely of many to follow;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sorry for the slow replies/no replies guys, been a busy 2 weeks or so! I have rung my local motorbike test place to try and book a test, got a really assy/prick of a guy on the other end of the one I was recommended so currently still looking. All i want to know is ideal costs, how long it'd take and whether they do it in consecutive days :( I have ridden dirt bikes in the past and as mentioned above I'm a quick learner! Hopefully soon enough, I'll have this bike test/training underway and be on soon! thanks for the info guys
 
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