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Is 2019+ one worth extra ~$1,000+ over 2015-2018 one?

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What is a monthly or annual insurance premium on a bike like this in your area?, full coverage.
All in NZD $

When I was on my learners and restricted licenses and riding the bike when it was still a LAMs bike (Learner Approved Motorcycle), it worked out to be $860 per year or around $16.50 a week for comprehensive insurance. The excess was $500 in the event of a claim.

Now that I'm on my full (unrestricted) license I can ride what I want, so I modified the R3 quite a bit which means it's no longer LAMs approved. The insurer I was with won't insure any bike that has an aftermarket ECU so I had to go through a specialist insurer. It works out to be a lot cheaper at $608 per year, or about $11.70 a week. The excess is $500.

That ECU caveat still baffles me as I they would have insured me for something like an R1M, no questions asked..
 

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All in NZD $

When I was on my learners and restricted licenses and riding the bike when it was still a LAMs bike (Learner Approved Motorcycle), it worked out to be $860 per year or around $16.50 a week for comprehensive insurance. The excess was $500 in the event of a claim.

Now that I'm on my full (unrestricted) license I can ride what I want, so I modified the R3 quite a bit which means it's no longer LAMs approved. The insurer I was with won't insure any bike that has an aftermarket ECU so I had to go through a specialist insurer. It works out to be a lot cheaper at $608 per year, or about $11.70 a week. The excess is $500.

That ECU caveat still baffles me as I they would have insured me for something like an R1M, no questions asked..
well here it is about $120 a month for the 3 month riding year, I am wondering is it worth investing in any bike when my riding season is so short?
 

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If you're looking at a motorcycle as strictly a business decision.. the only break-even venture you may find is an moderately priced moped: that gets 95+ MPG, requires little to no maintenance and insurance, and possibly no special operating license. Anything more is a trade off for the pleasure of a new hobby. Everyday expenses are always a trade off. I still use a 9 year old flip-phone and have never paid for cable/satellite TV. But, I wouldn't consider selling my motorcycle to pay for something I get little use and enjoyment out of.
It's the same answer to your original question... Is it worth the expense? You're actually the only one that can provide the answer. Good Luck on your decision. (y)
 

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If you're looking at a motorcycle as strictly a business decision.. the only break-even venture you may find is an moderately priced moped: that gets 95+ MPG, requires little to no maintenance and insurance, and possibly no special operating license. Anything more is a trade off for the pleasure of a new hobby. Everyday expenses are always a trade off. I still use a 9 year old flip-phone and have never paid for cable/satellite TV. But, I wouldn't consider selling my motorcycle to pay for something I get little use and enjoyment out of.
It's the same answer to your original question... Is it worth the expense? You're actually the only one that can provide the answer. Good Luck on your decision. (y)
well if this were truly about $ I would not even buy a 2008 CBR125R with 1400 miles, in decent condition, for $500 USD and it is local in my town, because the $85 USD a month insurance cost will not save me anything, I am buying a bike just purely as a toy to ride around on! if I want to look good on the bike, it would be this 2018 basically new R3, I love the bike!
 

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If you're looking at a motorcycle as strictly a business decision.. the only break-even venture you may find is an moderately priced moped: that gets 95+ MPG, requires little to no maintenance and insurance, and possibly no special operating license. Anything more is a trade off for the pleasure of a new hobby. Everyday expenses are always a trade off. I still use a 9 year old flip-phone and have never paid for cable/satellite TV. But, I wouldn't consider selling my motorcycle to pay for something I get little use and enjoyment out of.
It's the same answer to your original question... Is it worth the expense? You're actually the only one that can provide the answer. Good Luck on your decision. (y)
thoughts on a 2015 non ABS red/white 900 miler at $2K Canadian, $1700 USD, broken left peg, and fairing scratches from a stationary lay down, seems like a cheep way into a learner bike all of a sudden, will have photos in a day or so, will update.
 

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thoughts on a 2015 non ABS red/white 900 miler at $2K Canadian, $1700 USD, broken left peg, and fairing scratches from a stationary lay down, seems like a cheep way into a learner bike all of a sudden, will have photos in a day or so, will update.
Post some pictures. Can always scoop up a set of used fairings fairly cheap or even wrap the current ones.
 

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Agreed, that sounds an awesome price. Cosmetic damage can be unsightly, but easily repaired if it's too annoying. The 2015 was the first bike, with few changes through 2021... and has had several Safety Recalls... But the fix is free if they haven't been addressed yet.. so you may get some fluids refreshed, before you need to do it yourself. It's always a good idea to check for Safety Recalls on any pre-owned bike.. just in case. Plug in a VIN on Yamaha Canada official site.
Vehicle Status - Yamaha Motor Canada (yamaha-motor.ca)
 

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Here is a video, I have still but his video is even clearer on what is WRONG, I think it needs a new brake lever or at least heat up the one there and bending it back: ? And that peg is GONE!

 

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That looks awesome. The brake lever and foot rest are inexpensive. I have links below for schematics of the 2015 R3.
The first link is for the "Stand Footrest" part 19 in the diagram OEM part # 1wd-F7461-00-00.
The 2nd link is for the "Front Master Cylinder" part 8 in diagram OEM part# 1wd-H3922-00-00.
Check and verify be sure of the part numbers. I've been known to turn numbers around.
But the OEM part #s you see are standard, and will be the same Part #s through and reputable vendor and any engine search. So, I'm confident you'll have plenty of vendors in you locale. Good luck and Nice Find! (y)
Yamaha OEM Motorcycle Parts | MotoSport
Yamaha OEM Motorcycle Parts | MotoSport
 

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That looks awesome. The brake lever and foot rest are inexpensive. I have links below for schematics of the 2015 R3.
The first link is for the "Stand Footrest" part 19 in the diagram OEM part # 1wd-F7461-00-00.
The 2nd link is for the "Front Master Cylinder" part 8 in diagram OEM part# 1wd-H3922-00-00.
Check and verify be sure of the part numbers. I've been known to turn numbers around.
But the OEM part #s you see are standard, and will be the same Part #s through and reputable vendor and any engine search. So, I'm confident you'll have plenty of vendors in you locale. Good luck and Nice Find! (y)
Yamaha OEM Motorcycle Parts | MotoSport
Yamaha OEM Motorcycle Parts | MotoSport
Thanks! Will I regret this bike gas no ABS ?
 

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IMHO, No. The R3's brakes are perfectly adequate without ABS. The R3 wasn't even offered with ABS in 2015. I'm sure folks have different opinions concerning ABS, but you normally don't miss what you're not used to. Since I'm an old fart, I've been riding long enough to remember motorcycles with REALLY poor drum brakes on front and or rear. Today, bikes even on the "lower end" of the market, are far superior to even the most costly motorcycle of years past. We can all nit-pick all sorts of things, but there truly are very few "poor quality" bikes on the market today, and Yamaha makes none.
 

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Thanks! Will I regret this bike gas no ABS ?
Starting my riding out on the R3, the ABS has probably saved my but on a number of occasions. If you can get ABS I'd go for it, but it's not the end of the world. Having experience riding a bike with no ABS would certainly help with your braking skills. This is something a lot of younger riders don't have and most older and experienced (airhead83) do have.

When I make the move to my next bike, ABS is a must for me, but that's personal opinion!
 

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I've been riding for 20 years now. I can confidently perform a real-world emergency stop on a nice dry day with or without ABS. But, if it's pouring with rain on a dark night, and a car pulls in front of me, and I hit the brakes just as I'm about to go over a manhole cover, then I'll sure be glad that I'm on a bike with ABS!

My personal opinion: a lot of people say that it's better to learn braking on a bike without ABS. Personally, I think it's the opposite - when I learned to ride, I left so much safety margin because I was scared of locking up the front brake. On an ABS equipped bike, you could get a lot closer to limits of braking a lot more safely - having the ABS kick in would actually show you just how hard you can brake should you need to do a real emergency stop where there is little opportunity to leave things in reserve. (Obviously technique is still important here, as if you grab a handful of front brake, rather than progressively squeezing harder, then you'll feel that ABS kick in way sooner than if you'd used the correct technique.)

Ultimately, ABS is a safety net that will hopefully never kick in. But if it does, it could turn a potential accident into a barely noticeable and minor event. I'd highly recommend getting an ABS equipped bike if possible.


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I've been riding for 20 years now. I can confidently perform a real-world emergency stop on a nice dry day with or without ABS. But, if it's pouring with rain on a dark night, and a car pulls in front of me, and I hit the brakes just as I'm about to go over a manhole cover, then I'll sure be glad that I'm on a bike with ABS!

My personal opinion: a lot of people say that it's better to learn braking on a bike without ABS. Personally, I think it's the opposite - when I learned to ride, I left so much safety margin because I was scared of locking up the front brake. On an ABS equipped bike, you could get a lot closer to limits of braking a lot more safely - having the ABS kick in would actually show you just how hard you can brake should you need to do a real emergency stop where there is little opportunity to leave things in reserve. (Obviously technique is still important here, as if you grab a handful of front brake, rather than progressively squeezing harder, then you'll feel that ABS kick in way sooner than if you'd used the correct technique.)

Ultimately, ABS is a safety net that will hopefully never kick in. But if it does, it could turn a potential accident into a barely noticeable and minor event. I'd highly recommend getting an ABS equipped bike if possible.


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Thank you very much for such a detailed analysis from so far away, have a lot of relatives in your country and it's great. Well if it comes down to abs and price, that would mean I would have to Pony up a whole lot more for a newer R3 such as in my original post, or a budget 2015 cb300f ABS because that can be had with 170 km and $1,800 Canadian. I still do prefer the R3 with abs though, thoughts?
 

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I've been riding for 20 years now. I can confidently perform a real-world emergency stop on a nice dry day with or without ABS. But, if it's pouring with rain on a dark night, and a car pulls in front of me, and I hit the brakes just as I'm about to go over a manhole cover, then I'll sure be glad that I'm on a bike with ABS!

My personal opinion: a lot of people say that it's better to learn braking on a bike without ABS. Personally, I think it's the opposite - when I learned to ride, I left so much safety margin because I was scared of locking up the front brake. On an ABS equipped bike, you could get a lot closer to limits of braking a lot more safely - having the ABS kick in would actually show you just how hard you can brake should you need to do a real emergency stop where there is little opportunity to leave things in reserve. (Obviously technique is still important here, as if you grab a handful of front brake, rather than progressively squeezing harder, then you'll feel that ABS kick in way sooner than if you'd used the correct technique.)

Ultimately, ABS is a safety net that will hopefully never kick in. But if it does, it could turn a potential accident into a barely noticeable and minor event. I'd highly recommend getting an ABS equipped bike if possible.


Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
Wow this is a lot of votes for abs!
 
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