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Hello everyone, just got a Electric Teal R3 on Saturday! I got the bike for my wife who has never drove a motorcycle or a standard transmission, so this will be fun. She rides with me on my MT07 and decided she needed something for herself so this is where we decided to start. Over the course of the next few months I'll be teaching her from 0 experience to riding with me and the boys. We already ordered sliders for her bike and will be installing them as soon as they come in! I'll be documenting everything on our new YouTube channel, as well as asking questions here as I'm new to supersports.


Things we've ordered thus far
-TST slider package
-R6 throttle tube

Things I plan to order soon
  • Project SC Exhaust
  • Tune

If you got any experience/suggestions I'm all ears.
IMG_20210109_162014_034.jpg
 

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Nice bike, I thought it looked pretty ugly in the Yamaha adverts but it doesn't look to bad in that photo!

Those first mods are perfect. I'd suggest getting a tail tidy to get rid of the horrible rear fender.

For training tips, I'd suggest teaching her how to rev match. It's best to learn this early on so you don't have to unlearn any bad gear changing techniques.
 

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If only the forum would give us a topic to discuss Rider & Road Safety (as I outlined in the R3-Forums 2021 topic restructuring), we could be sharing notes.

It's a good time to teach the lady how to wrench, too.
  • Adjust the headlights to her preference
  • Check/change oil & oil filter change
  • Air filter change
  • Chain clean & adjust
    • This vehicle has a drive chain with small rubber O-rings between each side plate. Steam cleaning, high-pressure washing, certain solvents, and the use of a coarse brush can damage these O-rings.
    • While you're cleaning the drive sprocket, check the torque (54 ft-lbs) once in a few thousand miles
  • Chain alignment (using the tool from Motion Pro)
  • Brake fluid changes
Refer to the Service Manual Links thread
As far as I know, it's the same machine from 2015 underneath all the aesthetics..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nice bike, I thought it looked pretty ugly in the Yamaha adverts but it doesn't look to bad in that photo!

Those first mods are perfect. I'd suggest getting a tail tidy to get rid of the horrible rear fender.

For training tips, I'd suggest teaching her how to rev match. It's best to learn this early on so you don't have to unlearn any bad gear changing techniques.
Thank you! My girl loved the color, I was showing her the Ninja 400, MT03, and R3.. as soon as she saw the electric teal she just had to have it and I was glad because she kept it Yamaha. I own a MT07 with some mods on it and it's a blast, as well as I've owned plenty of banshees/raptors in my day. The color is great in person, Yamaha really knocked it out the park.

The sliders were the first thing for her because she is so scared of dropping the bike. She knows she can still drop it with the sliders but it just seems to give her a gaint relief knowing they're there. The tail tidy is coming up but she wants a Cardo first, and well happy wife = happy life.

We're going to be taking things real slow so for the next week I'm going

-On/off bike
-Review of turn signals, lights, horn, etc
-Making her push the bike around parking lots

Slow and steady wins the race.



If only the forum would give us a topic to discuss Rider & Road Safety (as I outlined in the R3-Forums 2021 topic restructuring), we could be sharing notes.

It's a good time to teach the lady how to wrench, too.
  • Adjust the headlights to her preference
  • Check/change oil & oil filter change
  • Air filter change
  • Chain clean & adjust
    • This vehicle has a drive chain with small rubber O-rings between each side plate. Steam cleaning, high-pressure washing, certain solvents, and the use of a coarse brush can damage these O-rings.
    • While you're cleaning the drive sprocket, check the torque (54 ft-lbs) once in a few thousand miles
  • Chain alignment (using the tool from Motion Pro)
  • Brake fluid changes
Refer to the Service Manual Links thread
As far as I know, it's the same machine from 2015 underneath all the aesthetics..
Thank you man, this is legit advice and honestly will probably make a Youtube video staightup off this suggestion in a few months.
 

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Nice bike, I thought it looked pretty ugly in the Yamaha adverts but it doesn't look to bad in that photo!
/QUOTE]
Dreadwill, always nice to see folks chime in for a new member.. It helps them feel welcome. But that compliment was akin to saying... Geez, that sure is a nice looking dog you have there. It's a shame it has that dung-colored fur. :oops:
 

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Hello everyone, just got a Electric Teal R3 on Saturday! I got the bike for my wife who has never drove a motorcycle or a standard transmission, so this will be fun. She rides with me on my MT07 and decided she needed something for herself so this is where we decided to start. Over the course of the next few months I'll be teaching her from 0 experience to riding with me and the boys. We already ordered sliders for her bike and will be installing them as soon as they come in! I'll be documenting everything on our new YouTube channel, as well as asking questions here as I'm new to supersports.


Things we've ordered thus far
-TST slider package
-R6 throttle tube

Things I plan to order soon
  • Project SC Exhaust
  • Tune

If you got any experience/suggestions I'm all ears. View attachment 68511
As a rider with over 40 years of experience, as well as being a rider coach for multiple a track-day organizations..... PLEASE don't put the R6 throttle tube on (at least for a while). The OEM throttle tube is designed to help new(er) riders adapt to learning to ride. Your wife will most likely do better with the OEM throttle tube for at least the first year (it's a marathon, NOT a sprint). When my wife wanted to learn to ride in 2014, I insisted she take the MSF rider coarse. She didn't want to, and wanted "me to teach her"- I flat out refused, and told her "I can't teach you what the MSF coarse does". I can easily teach the finer points of riding a track to a rider with minimal street riding experience. Teaching that same rider the basics of operating a motorcycle is a TOTALLY different skill set. I currently have the R6 throttle tube on ALL the track bikes my wife and I own (three R3's, and an FZ-07). I'm a big fan of such a
"cheap" upgrade as the R6 throttle tube. For a new rider, learning to ride- "not so much".... The OEM throttle tube is a much better choice for the first year. Obviously, you are an adult, and capable of choosing your own path. I just want to share my experience, and maybe help a new rider :cool:-
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As a rider with over 40 years of experience, as well as being a rider coach for multiple a track-day organizations..... PLEASE don't put the R6 throttle tube on (at least for a while). The OEM throttle tube is designed to help new(er) riders adapt to learning to ride. Your wife will most likely do better with the OEM throttle tube for at least the first year (it's a marathon, NOT a sprint). When my wife wanted to learn to ride in 2014, I insisted she take the MSF rider coarse. She didn't want to, and wanted "me to teach her"- I flat out refused, and told her "I can't teach you what the MSF coarse does". I can easily teach the finer points of riding a track to a rider with minimal street riding experience. Teaching that same rider the basics of operating a motorcycle is a TOTALLY different skill set. I currently have the R6 throttle tube on ALL the track bikes my wife and I own (three R3's, and an FZ-07). I'm a big fan of such a
"cheap" upgrade as the R6 throttle tube. For a new rider, learning to ride- "not so much".... The OEM throttle tube is a much better choice for the first year. Obviously, you are an adult, and capable of choosing your own path. I just want to share my experience, and maybe help a new rider :cool:-
I hope I didn't elude to doing thie soon, it's a far our mod. I don't even plan for her to be driving the bike for a few weeks, for now it's just physically moving the bike and getting on and off like my local MSF course taught us. We're going to take this very, very slow. I just know how much my R6 throttle tube helped on my MT07 so I know in the future I will 100% want to use it!

I appreciate the concern, I promise I am all for advice.

Instagram.com/TheYungSquids/
 

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@cornerslider & @TheYungSquids, what makes the R6 throttle worth it?
I've only read about it, but I haven't ever had the mind to replace the R3 throttle tube.

What exactly does it enhance?

I found a thread discussing it. I think I get the gist. I don't know how I feel about the R6 throttle tube for street use.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@cornerslider & @TheYungSquids, what makes the R6 throttle worth it?
I've only read about it, but I haven't ever had the mind to replace the R3 throttle tube.

What exactly does it enhance?

I found a thread discussing it. I think I get the gist. I don't know how I feel about the R6 throttle tube for street use.
You twist less to achieve throttle. It requires less rotation.
 

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As far as performance is concerned, I feel like I'd rather just learn about performance gains than buying stuff for the R3.
Beyond maintenance & suspension, there isn't any reason I can justify "upgrading" the R3.

I've owned the R3 for three years and all I've done to it was turn signal, rear fender delete, mirror risers, rear set, stator cover protector, Dunlop GPR 300s, and seat - all quality of life changes.

With the fork springs and Ninja 650 rear shock I haven't actually ridden it yet.

Spending any more on the R3 seems like it'd provide minimal returns.
I've written (or tried to) about ECU tuning, and the first iteration was "complex".

But wait there's more
However, now that I've learned about the aRacer RCMini5 ($495, includes bluetooth bLink) and the aRacer AF1 ($295, autotune), I feel like it's much more attainable with a full exhaust (Delkelvic full exhausts are ~$400USD). For around $1,200 + tax & shipping (of course).

To have the benefits of a tuned system that I can learn about as I go along, just seems something I would enjoy and be worth while.
Not to mention the fact that I could sell the bike with those upgrades and teach the next person how to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've read the forums but the answers are literally all over the place. What are you guys thoughts on lowering the bike. As you can see here shes on her tippy toes.


The forum seems to be all over the place with this answer

Whats the best way to lower the bike
 

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I wouldnt go altering the suspension on a brand new bike my dood. Ive ridden many huge bikes where i could barely touch the ground. My solution was to ride until the seat and suspension worked in. *Riding through it is my answer to almost everything in life. Or you could sell it and get her a grom.
Gl
 

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Take her to an MSF course to get the basics on a smaller bike (usually a 125cc).
You're not doing her any favors by trying to teach her how to ride a 321cc sportbike that looks 100% better condition than the motorcycles she should be learning on.

The experience of a class for her (and you if you haven't been through one) is well worth it, especially when you see the results.
The problem with teaching each other (even if you were an Instructor), is that it's not organized. In an MSF course, there's structure; a method to its madness. I can see, she's already more focused on impressing you than focusing on her riding.

It doesn't make you any less of a man by needing the help of a professional. Surely, without the help of professionals, we wouldn't be alive and well today, but here we are.
Take care and know the implications of Dunning-Kruger effect.

What ends up happening is you'll pass on your quirks as lessons and she'll think those quirks aren't mistakes. It happens to everyone outside a training environment. Teach someone how to do math, and you might teach them how you were taught, which may not be an effective way to learn.

Additionally, she might develop a fear of dropping the bike as she tries to learn how to ride; that's a bad mix - get her to a place where dropping bikes is common, in an environment where she won't destroy the beauty of a brand new motorcycle.

Then look into a lower seat, like the Saddlemen GP-V1 Low Cut (from the dropdown, you have to select "Low Cut", not "Standard Cut"). Changing the suspension this early on could get pricey.

I'd say, before you lower the bike, buy your lady some proper gear.
With the addition of a low cut seat (I believe it's a 1/2-inch lower) and proper boots, your lady will be more confident on the bike.

Full gear is as follows:
  • Helmet (full face: SHARP, Snell, or ECE-certified) (read up on the differences; I don't recall what makes them different)
    • I see your woman has a full face already (just ensure it's certified (by the least: DOT))
    • Because she has a full face helmet, and if it is certified, buy a smoke screen for her (unless she uses sunglasses during the day, which still may not work depending on how the sunglasses fit into the helmet)
      • Reason being that new riders and sun in tha face is stressful (there's enough other **** to worry about on the street)
  • Textile or leather (no mesh):
    • Jacket (long sleeve)
    • Pants
  • Leather gauntlet gloves
  • Leather above-ankle boots
  • Rain riding gear (depending on if you're going to be riding in the rain, of course, usually ends up being just a thin waterproof jacket and pants to put on over your other gear)
This is all about respect, really. You respect your woman - you'll protect your woman.
It doesn't matter if you're finding the friction zone, going for groceries, or going for a roadtrip; ride ATGATT, for life.
 

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I am taking my MSF novice class this weekend to get the permit.
I don't have a bike yet and I don't know how to ride.
R3 is at the top of the list.
Subbed for the Youtube channel.
 

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Regarding the lowering question - for a lot of bikes you can get seats that lower the sitting height an inch or two. However, the R3's seat is already pretty thin as it is so I'm not sure if there's much leeway for that. The only other way is lowering the suspension - I recall some talk, either on these forums or on YouTube on how someone did this.

If moneys not a problem she could try getting some leg extensions

 
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