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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all I am new to the forum and new to the R3 so hello, it's great to be here and I have learned a ton from you guys already! I love this R3 and it seems to be a great practical fun bike with a lot going for it that I will enjoy for years to come.

I've seen some posts about others wondering if you'll get tired of 320cc's or if it has enough power and it prompted this post which I have written not only for others but also as a reminder for myself if I get tempted to stray...

I believe others have correctly answered that it is all 'relative'. It truly does depend on your Paradigm or perspective.

To help put us R3 Guys in a happy contented Paradigm I have compiled the list below of some well known Bike's and Cars whose 0-60 times are right in line with the R3. I know 0-60 is'nt everything but it's pretty darn close.

It truly is amazing what Yamaha has done with 321cc's


MOTORCYCLES

2015 Yamaha R3
321cc Parallel Twin
0-60 in 5.1


2001 Harley-Davidson Softail Fat Boy
1450cc Twin Cam
0-60 in 5.0


2013 Triumph Thruxton
865cc parallel-twin
0-60 in 5.0


2007 Harley-Davidson Nightster
1,200-cc Evolution V-twi
0-60 in 4.8


2013 Star Bolt R-Spec
942ccV-Twin
0-60 in 4.8


2013 Honda CB500F
471cc paralleltwin engine
0-60 in 4.8


2007 Kawasaki Versys 650
650cc paralleltwin
0-60 in 4.9



CARS

2015 Dodge Challenger R/T
Super Charged V8
0-60 in 5.1


2000 Ford Mustang Roush Stage 3
Super Charged V8
0-60 in 5.0


2009 Maserati Quattroporte Sport GT S
High-Output V-8
0-60 in 5.0


2010 Jaguar XF 5.0 Premium
Premium V-8
0-60 in 5.0



0-60 Times from: http://www.zeroto60times.com/
 

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This is a pretty neat list though. I don't bother having a go with anything really, just punch it when I need it to move around people.
 

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I agree with Kojiro. There many different things that make the r3 much different than other bikes and other cars regardless of similar speeds. Some things could be power (low end power, upper range power), comfort, what the vehicle is being used for (racing/cruising), etc. A lot of us didn't just buy the r3 for 0-60. I do understand what you are trying to say though. The r3 is a great bike for the money and can keep up with other bikes, but we bought it for various reasons.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I agree with Kojiro. There many different things that make the r3 much different than other bikes and other cars regardless of similar speeds. Some things could be power (low end power, upper range power), comfort, what the vehicle is being used for (racing/cruising), etc. A lot of us didn't just buy the r3 for 0-60. I do understand what you are trying to say though. The r3 is a great bike for the money and can keep up with other bikes, but we bought it for various reasons.
Oh yes for sure. Much more to a bike then it's speed but from what I have read it just seemed the common posts about "needing more" were related to torque / power. Very few posts focused on other aspects of the Bike causing them to need something more.

The R3 is definitely much more than it's 0-60 but I think this aspect is in the front of many of our minds as, after all, we are riding sport bikes :)

Personally I drive a Ford Focus so getting onto the R3 from that is awesome as I am then getting the same 0-60 as the 2015 Dodge Challenger R/T. Much better than thinking 'if only I had a Triple S..."
 

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With around 15k in mods on my 07 G35x, I was running 0-60 in 4.9 and 1/4 miles in the high 12's to low 13's.

The numbers may be close but there was way more thrill in hammering the gas in the G than I've ever felt on the R3 but like others have said, that wasn't my intent or need with the bike.

Similar numbers or not, the bike just feels lackluster compared to my Infiniti and I'm totally okay with that.
 

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I get the most thrills on the R3 passing 600's and sometimes liter bikes in the corners on a track. It's straight line speed for me is very lackluster, and to be honest even straight line speed on the ZX6R was relatively boring compared to just cornering on the R3.
 

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I hear it a lot.. bigger bikes can't keep up with the smaller ones in the corners and I've seen a ton of videos to prove it. I don't ride a track though and don't want to ride the street dragging knee either. I do wish the bike had more straight line grunt though, and it's not because I want to go fast. I just want to get to speed quicker (cause it's fun) :)

I'm jealous of you guys with track experience. I'd explore it if I had more time and money to throw into yet another hobby.
 

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I hear it a lot.. bigger bikes can't keep up with the smaller ones in the corners and I've seen a ton of videos to prove it. I don't ride a track though and don't want to ride the street dragging knee either. I do wish the bike had more straight line grunt though, and it's not because I want to go fast. I just want to get to speed quicker (cause it's fun) :)

I'm jealous of you guys with track experience. I'd explore it if I had more time and money to throw into yet another hobby.
The reason I think the bike has enough grunt for me is because in San Diego most 65 mph traffic zones actually have 75-85 mph traffic. I commuted on the R3 with that and never felt it didn't have enough passing power. It had less than my zx6r obviously but it still could pass. It could go over 100 if needed. Some people will say " but it doesn't have the passing power of your/my/his 600" and while that's true, my 600 did not have the same roll on power as a liter bike but that never caused me to think a 600 isn't enough on the street in San Diego. Some people actually think that 600's are somehow gutless bikes and don't have enough power for the street. Twist the throttle more?

Also, if you can, get the bike on a track. Best $150 you will spend motorcycling. It's so much fun.
 

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Feels slower after driving it for a good long time. When I first started riding motorcycles, I thought I was going fast looked down it was 15mph. After a while even fast feels slow but it must be that initial experience.

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Feels slower after driving it for a good long time. When I first started riding motorcycles, I thought I was going fast looked down it was 15mph. After a while even fast feels slow but it must be that initial experience.

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Lol right? When I first started, I was like "why would anyone need to go over 65mph on the freeway on a bike?" A week later, 75 feels average/somewhat slow.

One time in a group ride I did around 145-150 indicated on the ZX6R. Slowing down to 100, I felt like I was crawling. 100 isn't exactly slow but from 150 down to 100, it certainly felt that way.
 

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There has always been a full-on pucker effect for me anytime I get near that 95mph mark. For me, there is zero need for it.
I'm sure if I had thousands of hours in the saddle with lots of track experience under my belt, I'd probably feel differently. Since I'm only on the street, I'm happy being somewhere around speed limit 100% of the time. I just like getting there fast :)

I'd say I'm just too old to go that fast now (because I am) but I've always felt that way when I'm on a bike.
 

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There has always been a full-on pucker effect for me anytime I get near that 95mph mark. For me, there is zero need for it.
I'm sure if I had thousands of hours in the saddle with lots of track experience under my belt, I'd probably feel differently. Since I'm only on the street, I'm happy being somewhere around speed limit 100% of the time. I just like getting there fast :)

I'd say I'm just too old to go that fast now (because I am) but I've always felt that way when I'm on a bike.
Age is nothing but a number sir. I have track and racer friends in their mid fifties. Have ridden with some really fast street riders in their fifties and sixties.
 

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Age is nothing but a number sir. I have track and racer friends in their mid fifties. Have ridden with some really fast street riders in their fifties and sixties.
Oh, I agree and if I had more play money kicking around for yet one more hobby, I'd hit the track and have a blast. And before anyone says it... I know track days are relatively cheap but I don't want to track this bike. It's my baby and I'd be bummed if anything happened to it. That means, I'd need another toy... and that means more $.

My "I'm too old" comment was aimed toward riding on the street. Too much to go wrong out there with way too many variables trying to kill you. That, and I don't mend as quickly as I used to :)
 

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I hear it a lot.. bigger bikes can't keep up with the smaller ones in the corners and I've seen a ton of videos to prove it. I don't ride a track though and don't want to ride the street dragging knee either. I do wish the bike had more straight line grunt though, and it's not because I want to go fast. I just want to get to speed quicker (cause it's fun) :)
I think a lot of it comes down to the types of roads you have at your disposal when/where you ride your R3. If your only roads are long open corners and straight lines, then you're gonna want more grunt and straight line performance. If your roads are tight, the R3 won't have you craving more.
 

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For me, I've learned over the years that I much perfer using the limits of a vehicle - within reason - than being well under the limits of a vehicle.

I am just getting back into riding after a 13 year absense. During that 13 year period, I was focused on cars. I went through a list of them including V8 powered Camaros and Subaru STI. Back in 2009 I went to a Skip Barber program at Laguna Seca and fell in love with the Mazda Miata. Bout a '91 shortly after that class and was doing local track days. I have never had more fun on the street or track than I have had in my miatas (Had a '91 and a '99). If you have never driven a competently prepped Miata, you should!

All that is to say, I don't want a 600cc Super Sport. I am much too reserved on the street and would never touch the triple digit speeds those bikes can reach in a blink. It is kind of boring to me to have a car/bike that has that much power. I would much rather work a bike through the gears and feel involved at legal speeds. That said, I think I probay picked the wrong bike to get back into riding :)

A month ago I bought a '16 Ducati Scrambler. Beautiful bike. But for me, it is too powerful to exploit on the street. I considered the R3, did a test ride, and honestly had the most fun on it. Unfortunately, I convinced myself thet every part of the Ducati is just better, which it really is. Better suspension, MUCH better brakes, better fit and finish, better sound (that Ducati induction noise!). In retrospect, I think I may have been better off with the R3 and some suspension and brake upgrades. A properly modded R3 would have been much more of a Miata-like experience.

To make a long post short, it is way more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow!
 

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Most of the complaints about power seem to come from less experienced riders. I have seen a few R3 reviewers on YouTube who clearly don’t know how to rev match in the power band – you can tell they’ve spent most of their riding lives using 1-2 gears on a bigger engine. Even with all the necessary shifting I rarely find myself using more than 1/3 of the R3’s power in any kind of traffic, and the 9k+ gear pulls in the open are pure sex.

As others have suggested, there are those who live out of the city who wouldn’t mind foregoing the work a 300 needs to just twist & teleport on a liter bike.
 

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Going fast constantly

There has always been a full-on pucker effect for me anytime I get near that 95mph mark. For me, there is zero need for it.
I'm sure if I had thousands of hours in the saddle with lots of track experience under my belt, I'd probably feel differently. Since I'm only on the street, I'm happy being somewhere around speed limit 100% of the time. I just like getting there fast :)

I'd say I'm just too old to go that fast now (because I am) but I've always felt that way when I'm on a bike.
As another has said "Age is but a number" I am 62, like to ride a quick as the roads and surroundings allows. Luckily where I am is sparsely populated, but, with many small villages straddling the roads, (Dogs, chickens) being able to brake quickly can give you confidence. Have a modded CBR250R, with Pirellis and sintered pads, fore and aft. On this bike I could outcorner and out brake anyone riding my R3??
Jesse Norton who races R3's supplied racing pads (amongst a lot else :)). My R3 become such a better bike to ride quicker, after fitting racing pads.

Riding fast is cool, but being able to stop faster and safely can help you ride faster. It is in the mind, knowing what your bike can do, you taking it higher and higher towards that 100% which only rare riders (Track) can do.

I raced production class 250 in the late 70's/80's. My Yamaha (YDS7/RD) was modded and my mates BMW 1000cc (boxer) could not get past me except on a straight at 80+mph.

Had then, guys I raced with who would go out and try and lock the front wheel at tight bends during practise, they wanted to know what grip the track had :eek: Tried once, dropped the bike, never tried it again.
Those were the guys that could take a bike to it's limits. Tried following the leaders who had lapped me. Only brake when I seen the rear of the bike lift and follow their line. Heart in mouth stuff.

Sorry ladies, but, never enjoyed the company of the more attractive sex on practise and track days during my early/mid 20's. sigh...... long time ago:crying:
 

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Not sure why you quoted my comment and then went on to talk about track days. I'll state it again though... my comment was regarding street riding.
I will admit though, the bike has a lot to do with it as well. I don't hooligan around on public roads and for the most part, stick to the speed limits. I have had the opportunity to get the new bike up to speed though and I'll say this. Getting the Triumph Thruxton R into triple digits speeds is far less scary than how it felt when I had the R3 up to even 70-80.
 
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