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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much better are the after market forks and shocks for the R3? Are they worth the $1000 - $2000 it costs? For comparison is it better then the stock OEM on say 2015 R6 or R1? I've ridden both and it's nice, much better then R3. Trying to get a feel of how much better a R3 would be with forks / shocks and if it's worth spending half the value of my bike on suspension.
 

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They will only be as good as how well you can tune them to your weight and style of riding. Since you cannot do too much tuning to the stock forks other than perhaps change the oil weight, I would say the aftermarket stuff is much much better than what stock will do for you. Same goes for the shock. I would even say they are easier to tune than something like the BPFs on my old zx6r, since compression is tuned on one side and rebound in the other. No need to tune compression twice and rebound twice lol.
 

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Get the Andrianni inserts. They are fairly cheap and make a world of difference. It's hard to justify $2K forks on a $5 K bike unless you are competing at a high level.

CJ
 

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The prob I have with Andreani is that you end up altering the insides of your bike. I usually separate aftermarket parts when I sell a bike to try and recoup some money. With the ohlinns you don't mod anything internally so you can go back to stock configuration and sell the bike that way. Also, if you don't know what you are doing you will spend some money for labor on the Andreani. The Ohlins are really easy to install, main difference is you don't alter anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The prob I have with Andreani is that you end up altering the insides of your bike. I usually separate aftermarket parts when I sell a bike to try and recoup some money. With the ohlinns you don't mod anything internally so you can go back to stock configuration and sell the bike that way. Also, if you don't know what you are doing you will spend some money for labor on the Andreani. The Ohlins are really easy to install, main difference is you don't alter anything.
From the replies seems like everyone agrees fork inserts such as AK-20 or Ohlins will make the R3 better suspension wise then a stock R6 or R1? Just trying to get a comparison as I've been on the 2015 R6 and R1, but not a suspension modified R3. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Get the Andrianni inserts. They are fairly cheap and make a world of difference. It's hard to justify $2K forks on a $5 K bike unless you are competing at a high level.

CJ
No racing here. Just doing a few track days each year and if the modified suspension can help me avoid even one crash. They've paid for themselves and then some.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Anyone have experience with the Andreani and Ohlins Nix22? They're about the same price range, while the Traxxion AK-20 are almost twice as much.
 

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From the replies seems like everyone agrees fork inserts such as AK-20 or Ohlins will make the R3 better suspension wise then a stock R6 or R1? Just trying to get a comparison as I've been on the 2015 R6 and R1, but not a suspension modified R3. Thanks.
Not sure how/ why it would outperform the stock suspension in the R6/1? Those already have comp/reb/preload damping, which is the same as what you are getting with an Ohlins kit. The Ohlins kit imho is leagues ahead of the stock parts. Compared to stock parts on an R6, zx6r, etc however, it's nothing to write home about.

Can't speak for the AK-20's as I have never owned or even seen them in person.

I have the Ohlins and am satisfied with them. Easy install, good tunability and at a good price.
 

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I think the better way to state it is in terms of the tunability. OEM suspension components have generally been designed and built with a more narrow tuning range. For example the oil flow passages (valves) are only so large with shim stacks that are set up for those hole sizes. The hole sizes are the tuning limitation. After market valves usually have larger holes for the oil to flow through so the tuning limitation is not the valves/holes. The new tuning factor becomes the shim stack.

That said, when the manufacture is building a bike for the masses, the common range for all rides is a more narrow range, so they are doing the cost effective thing. The more demanding rider will want tunability for specific conditions. It is here that the aftermarket can help.

So as stated earlier, you have to know how to tune the suspension for the road conditions AND you have to know how to efficiently ride the road [course] to get most out of the bike. Most riders are not in that camp.

Also, factory suspensions are continuing to improve all the time. So bikes with the top end suspension stuff will be surpassed by a bike 2 generations later.

I say always get the best you can afford and learn to adjust your suspension to what you like. Always try to improve your riding skills, even if you are just a cruiser. Ans, stop worrying if you have best suspension kit, someone will get a better set up sooner or later.

Jerry
 

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trackday crashes are >95% due to rider error, not suspension issue. If your inputs to the bike are correct, more than likely you will not crash.

If you want to up your pace and bike is giving you different feedback, then for getting bike to do what you want, aftermarket suspension will help, only if tuned correctly.

I have Andreani kit on both my R3's and they work great, as in I get sufficient feedback and can tune it to do how I like to ride. Same goes for the Ohlins rear shock.

I have tuned and ridden on both Pirelli and Bridgestone oversize slicks. The above mentioned suspension components are more than sufficient to handle these changes.
 

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HI we put a ninja 650 rear shock on the r3 way better for anyone heavier than 140 pounds plus it added ground clearance to the all ready low r3. Here's a video of the shock in the r3 https://youtu.be/6oaIl3uni1U
The total cost of the shock and parts needed to make it work was like 60 to 80 bucks. So much cheaper than a aftermarket shock.
 

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I suspect the ninja 650R rear shock is very close to the same as the Kawasaki Versys rear shock, maybe overall length is shorter, not sure. I put a 2008 Yamaha R1 shock on my Versys and the results were night and day. Since the R1 shock is progressive link, I had to change out the spring. I also had to bore out the top bushing to fit the Versys. Used R1 shock on Ebay $75.00 USD, spring $90, and a machinist to bore the top bushing $20. So for about $175.00 you get a top line shock with compression and rebound adjustments. Something worth looking into,
 

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I suspect the ninja 650R rear shock is very close to the same as the Kawasaki Versys rear shock, maybe overall length is shorter, not sure. I put a 2008 Yamaha R1 shock on my Versys and the results were night and day. Since the R1 shock is progressive link, I had to change out the spring. I also had to bore out the top bushing to fit the Versys. Used R1 shock on Ebay $75.00 USD, spring $90, and a machinist to bore the top bushing $20. So for about $175.00 you get a top line shock with compression and rebound adjustments. Something worth looking into,
The versys shock is slightly longer than the 650 shock. If you go to yamahar3racing.com, Jesse is actually machining and selling R6 shocks to be fitted into the R3. Labeled as "race spec", they may be worth looking into if you don't have the tools to do the fit yourself, or don't want to do the R&D. For a few hundred more than your do-it-yourself, but a few hundred less than buying a shock built for the R3(Ohlins, K tech, Penske, JRI, etc), it's another alternative to look at.

What spring did you end up swapping with and where did you buy it from?
 

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It has been a few years but I went with a Hypercoil spring purchased from Hypercoil. Wish I had known about the R6 option from yamaha3racing, I did not think the resevoir would fit so I went with a Hyperpro shock. We will see how that goes. They are not cheap, something like $550.

Will try race tech springs on the front slightly stiffer .80 Kgf instead of .66 Kgf. Also ordered Ricor Intiminators for the front, so we will see how that goes. If I can´t tune them for multisurface roads we have here, I may just stick with the Racetech springs and play with the fork oil viscosity along with a few mm of more air gap.
 

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I know this thread tends to be more focused on the racing aspect, but I've searched the forum and can't find any mention of the Ohlins FSK-104 replacement springs. I see Anunaki racing sells them, but no comments...
For $250 (at Sportbike Track Gear, for instance) this has to be a simple upgrade that should improve the ride quality of the R3 from stock, and not so expensive that it's not worth it for a small bike such as this.
I'm assuming that the Ohlins FSK series spring replacements (with preload adjust; in itself an improvement over stock forks) is so new that no one has played with it yet, but if anyone has, I'd love some kind of review.
 

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I know this thread tends to be more focused on the racing aspect, but I've searched the forum and can't find any mention of the Ohlins FSK-104 replacement springs. I see Anunaki racing sells them, but no comments...
For $250 (at Sportbike Track Gear, for instance) this has to be a simple upgrade that should improve the ride quality of the R3 from stock, and not so expensive that it's not worth it for a small bike such as this.
I'm assuming that the Ohlins FSK series spring replacements (with preload adjust; in itself an improvement over stock forks) is so new that no one has played with it yet, but if anyone has, I'd love some kind of review.
I've looked at these in the past too but I can't tell if it's just what's seen in the picture or if there is some sort of emulator with each one and a different damper rod? If it's really just spring, preload tube, and preload adjuster cap, then it's certainly NOT worth the money. It won't make a **** difference other than you can do some fine adjustment on the preload.
 

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I know this thread tends to be more focused on the racing aspect, but I've searched the forum and can't find any mention of the Ohlins FSK-104 replacement springs. I see Anunaki racing sells them, but no comments...
For $250 (at Sportbike Track Gear, for instance) this has to be a simple upgrade that should improve the ride quality of the R3 from stock, and not so expensive that it's not worth it for a small bike such as this.
I'm assuming that the Ohlins FSK series spring replacements (with preload adjust; in itself an improvement over stock forks) is so new that no one has played with it yet, but if anyone has, I'd love some kind of review.
Assuming you have a standard damper rod set up, a bike with the correct springs for your weight ( what you ar paying for in the kit) will always feel better than something over or undersprung for your weight. The preload adjusters really help fine tuning because taking out preload tubes, cutting, replacing, riding and test riding can be tedious. That said, you can piece together a similar kit for less money. $90 sonic springs, $50 for some 41mm preload adjusters, and around $4 for a piece of pvc pipe. As mentioned, unless it came with some kind of emulator/intiminator, its it worth the extra money for the name alone.
 
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