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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for suggestions for work boots that work well as riding boots, and a rear seat rig to carry gear with.

I'm specifically starting as an Electrician apprentice.

Thanks for any ideas!
Ian
 

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I ride a MT-03 which is basically the same bike as the R3 less the fairing and clip ons. I do not have access to an OEM parts fiche to compare the subframes of these two models, but I would think that both sub frames will share a similar bolt pattern for the rear grab bar that the MT-03 has.

Here is what I am going to try:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItemVersion&item=262603722853&view=all&tid=1970664237016

I have two Kriega 20 liter bags that I can loop over the passenger seat. I can strap the two 20 L bags to these grab rails and also run two wide cordura straps over the passenger seat for additional support. Forty liters of storage is enough capacity for me as I seldom tour with more than 40 lbs of gear. If you are transporting tools, then I would suggest that you purchase a small vinyl trash can from walmart that has a similar base footprint size of your soft luggage bag. Cut the plastic trash can to fit the bottom of your soft luggage to protect the base luggage material from tears. Hope that helps,

>>>Good luck with your apprenticeship.. I did he same 40 years ago in Texas (4 yr apprentice) and retired when I was 46.
 

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Ventura, a company based in New Zealand (i think), makes excellent pack racks and luggage options.

If you do get their luggage rack, make note that if you want a fender eliminator as well your options are limited, as it uses the same bolts that the fender eliminator attaches to. The R&G one works perfectly fine with the rack.

Thats what I use, and I use bungee straps to hold my esky down on it.

As for the boots thing, you can get used to riding in work boots easy. I wear steel-toe boots to work and honestly theyre really comfortable to ride in.
 

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Rode with steel toes daily(ish) for three years. They were comfortable for the most part.

Yamaha has an oem rear rack option, which can be ordered from outside the United States for sure on sites like ebay, and possibly from us dealers. Several aftermarket options exist as well.

Between the rack and the rear seat, I can't see you having any issues with commuting unless you need big equipment like pipe benders, band saws, etc
 

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Would wear one of those covers for your boots. The gear will eat up the top of your boots in a few rides. Used to happen all the time on my r6. My timbs would get shredded. Never tried it on r3 though
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the suggestions guys- I guess I'll just look for comfy and water resistant work boots, and then since I don't have to carry a ton of gear I'll get those hand rails and figure out an effective strap system to hold my work bag and rain cover.
 

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These are the boots I use at work and they ride well. The toe box is a composite material and has held up well in my 100 mile daily commute. They are water resistant but do not breathe well. I'm not sure if they carry the electrical insulation rating required as an electricians' apprentice. But for me, working in a facilities maintenance, I like them.

 

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For you guys who use work boots for riding, how is the ankle protection on these? I sometimes am too lazy to get out of uniform and into riding gear when I am on base and wear my military boots while on the bike. I am pretty sure those things will NOT offer any ankle protection in a crash, though they are steel toed/leather and extend above my ankles.
 

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For you guys who use work boots for riding, how is the ankle protection on these? I sometimes am too lazy to get out of uniform and into riding gear when I am on base and wear my military boots while on the bike. I am pretty sure those things will NOT offer any ankle protection in a crash, though they are steel toed/leather and extend above my ankles.
Like most people explain, something is better than nothing. Work boots are probably better than shoes, but still a huge step down from riding shoes and riding boots. Screenshot_2017-03-27-09-09-04.png

These are nice is just don't know if they have steel toes. I mean if you are an electrical contractor you might not do the work required for steel toe, although some of the contractors I work with still use steel toe boots
 

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Like most people explain, something is better than nothing. Work boots are probably better than shoes, but still a huge step down from riding shoes and riding boots. View attachment 50417

These are nice is just don't know if they have steel toes. I mean if you are an electrical contractor you might not do the work required for steel toe, although some of the contractors I work with still use steel toe boots
I never really got the purpose of riding shoes. They won't offer (imo) anymore protection than a pair of Timbs or Caterpillar boots. They will offer abrasion resistance and a steel toe, but still lack ankle support.
 

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Not much protection, but enough to keep away abrasion as long as the shoe stays on.

I crashed in a pair of high top nikes and had my foot dragged under the bike a good 20 feet or so. No injuries at all. I was lucky that nothing twisted, but the leather in the shoes held up well against the pavement and I'd expect boots to do that same.
 

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Most riding shoes have a high top ankle section. They really comfortable but I dig the look of these super duty boots.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk
 
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