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I don't race so don't have a need for a smaller/lighter battery. That said, the OEM one does everything I need it to do.

If tou are still looking to upgrade it, the anti gravity ones look really good on paper.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I use a battery tender but still ride during less frigid but still cold days. Also, probably attaching a gps with a dedicated line to the power along with the Scorpio Ride/Secure data & security system. Have to see what they draw and if everything stays under or exceeds the power limits. Used to have a radar/laser detector on my old bike too, but with the proliferation of lasers, spending $600 on a good detector doesn't help much when it's lasers. Of course, jammers are different but I think they're illegal in NY. I don't mind spending a few extra bucks on a more robust b& lighter battery that adds to the overall weight savings and improves performance.

Think I'll look at some Anti-Gravity batteries.
 

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Thanks for the feedback Mase. I decided upon a Shorai last night while window shopping-just haven't settled on the model yet. Might go with the same one.
 

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Shopping for one and there are a lot of offerings. Any recs?
http://www.r3-forums.com/forum/554-electronics/7041-lithium-battery.html
http://www.r3-forums.com/forum/554-electronics/57170-battery-pulse-p1.html
http://www.r3-forums.com/forum/554-electronics/68858-anti-gravity-battery.html

I've used Shorai (in the bike now), Ballistic (was in bike, failed), Moty, Anti-Gravity and a few others.

I disagree that they are 'so much better' than a lead-acid and here's why:
- they are definitely lighter so way better that way - no doubt about it.
- they will generally hold a charge longer than a lead-acid - so that's good - however:
- harder to come by if you need one in a hurry.
- you can jump-start a lead-acid no problem. Try that with a LiPo and you may just grenade the battery and burn down the bike (and anything else nearby) in the process - seen it happen**. (the ballistic 4 cell, for example. will only allow a 0.8 amp charge rate). When the LiPo fails, it can fail spectacularly.
- it's pretty hard to overcharge a lead-acid. Overcharge a LiPo and bad things happen.
- typical life of a lead acid is about 5 years. I've had one LiPo that lasted that long, typically 2-3 years is what I've seen.
- you may need a special charger beyond the standard trickle charge battery maintainer.

I use them in all my bikes - overall I've been pretty happy with them, but they certainly have some limitations. I'd have to dig around a bit to find out what the R3 voltage regulator charge specs are compared to max recommended charge rate for the various LiPo batteries out there - the Shorai in the bike now allows up to 8a charge rate which seems to be the upper end of what I've seen......

Not trying to scare anyone away from these batteries - overall, they are a pretty good upgrade and seem to be reasonably dependable - but - they don't handle abuse as well as a lead-acid so you have to be a bit more attentive to the limitations of the LiPo.

**Edit: Guy pitted next to me had a dead LiPo, threw a car battery charger on it and within a couple of minutes it EX-PLO-DEAD - sounded like a .22 going off. A couple of minutes after that, the battery caught fire and burned his bike to a pile of rubble.
 

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True, a SHORAI battery has it's advantages and disadvantages. SHORAI is a LiFe, not a LiPo. ( Lithium Iron Phosphate )

They are super light, and they have more cranking power. I put one in my CBR1000RR. The stock one cranked the engine slow. The SHORAI cranks it over faster. You can't use a typical battery charger on it. You can't use a BATTERY TENDER on it either. You must use a charger specifically designed for LiFe batteries, and they cost more. SHORAI batteries are supposed to last longer than a lead-acid battery, but mine has only been in my bike for 2 years so far. Basically, you just install it in the bike, and forget about it. You want to make sure you don't have a constant parasitic drain on the battery, because you are not supposed to let a LiFe battery discharge below a certain point. If you ride it regularly, it shouldn't be an issue. If you want to save weight, and crank your engine over faster, a LiFe is a good way to go. They are considerably more expensive compared to a lead-acid battery.
 

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You are correct, sir! Both the Shorai and the Moty are LiFE's - I just lumped them together for the purposes of my rant. I killed my first Moty by leaving it plugged in over the winter - by spring, parasitic draw rendered that battery useless - lesson learned. They guy who built them was local, and after properly informing me of my stupidity, he graciously replaced it - that one has lasted 3 years so far.
 

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Thanks for the points. I am very familiar with Lipo's having used them for years in RC vehicles. I just like the idea of a more consistent voltage being available but I also know about the dangers of using them as well.

I think for me the big draw was the obvious weight savings. It doesn't sound like much but extra weight is extra weight. I do have specific chargers for those batteries which balance the cells properly and monitor the voltage etc. so I'm not concerned about that at all.
 

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Just did a quick google search for lithium ion vs lithium iron and got some good articles. Here's an interesting one.

http://www.sportrider.com/tech/lithium-ion-vs-lithium-iron-batteries-ask-geek

"..lithium-ion batteries can and do catch fire if they get to thermal overrun. In brief, if the lithium-ion gets to about 350 degrees Fahrenheit, it will run away."

"A lithium-iron battery is a particular type of lithium-ion battery, and does not have the same problems with thermal overrun as the lithium-ion batteries..."

The article doesn't mention anything about trying to jump start your lithium iron battery though.
 

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I was looking at the Hard Racing site just now and don't know which battery to get. They have the 4 cell and 8 cell AntiGravity or Ballistic Evo 2 as the main options. Both are supposed to be compatible with the R3.

My question is - the AntiGravity is listed at 12v 2.3aH for the 4 cell and 12v 4.6aH for the 8 cell. The Ballistic is 13.6v and a lead acid equivalent 8aH for the 4 cell or 13.6v and a lead acid equivalent 15 aH for the 8 cell.

They also sell the lithium battery charger for an extra 50 bones.

So on the surface, it would seem that that 8 cell Ballistic should be the one to go for but my question is - what does the stock battery put out voltage wise and what's the capacity? Also, from reading the site, the lithium battery is much smaller - what do I do to secure the battery in place of the stock one?
 

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For securing, most of these batteries, if not all, come with foam to stuff into the original battery box so the battery fits. I know the Anti Gravity one does for sure.

As for voltage, they are the same. Most people just refer to the charging system as a 12 volt system. It really puts out @13.9 volts, which is what Ballistic is quoting. While Anti Gravity is just referring to the 12 volt system.

Amp hours, (aH) simply refers to how long a battery will last at a certain draw while not charging. If your bike is running, the battery should (if everything is working properly) be charging. It would matter more for the cold cranking amps (CCA), if you are in a colder climate. That is what matters for turning your engine over.

One thing to remember with LiFe/LiPo batteries is that they do not really like the cold. Not that any battery likes the cold, but those types will drain faster and need to "warm up" more before trying to start the bike. Turning your lights on and letting the bike sit a short while (maybe 30-60 seconds) can really make a difference.
 

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For securing, most of these batteries, if not all, come with foam to stuff into the original battery box so the battery fits. I know the Anti Gravity one does for sure.

As for voltage, they are the same. Most people just refer to the charging system as a 12 volt system. It really puts out @13.9 volts, which is what Ballistic is quoting. While Anti Gravity is just referring to the 12 volt system.

Amp hours, (aH) simply refers to how long a battery will last at a certain draw while not charging. If your bike is running, the battery should (if everything is working properly) be charging. It would matter more for the cold cranking amps (CCA), if you are in a colder climate. That is what matters for turning your engine over.

One thing to remember with LiFe/LiPo batteries is that they do not really like the cold. Not that any battery likes the cold, but those types will drain faster and need to "warm up" more before trying to start the bike. Turning your lights on and letting the bike sit a short while (maybe 30-60 seconds) can really make a difference.
Thanks! Thought maybe I was losing my mind or something. I knew that automotive batteries were all 12v but they put out something closer to 13-14 volts. Didn't know motorcycles were the same!
 

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I was perusing the Hard Racing.com site and can't decide now between the Shorai, AntiGravity or the WPS Featherweight OEM Replacement Lithium battery.

There are those of you who have installed the Shorai which I can source locally. I was thinking that Hard Racing sells the Lithium specific trickle charger and they also have the AntiGravity lithium portable jumpers.

Branding considerations aside, assuming that they were all similar weights, capacity and CCA, is there any reason to choose one over the other?
 
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