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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I've been riding for about 5 years and I am currently riding a 2007 CBR600RR. I have no intention of ever selling my CBR600RR however I know I'm not pushing it to its higher potential. I use the bike daily for commuting in a small city/rural area to and from work and I love taking road trips with it. lately, I've been paying attention to how my tires are wearing and how my 600RR develops flat spots on the tires from my commute. My cousin is just about to pick up a 2022 60th anniversary moto GP R3 in 2 weeks. This has had me checking out the Yamaha R3 up and down and I'm seriously considering buying a new Yamaha R3. I'm thinking a Yamaha R3 would be the perfect commuter/occasional road trip bike with the odd track day here and there to help improve my riding ability thus allowing my CBR600RR to be my weekend warrior.

Are there any 600 riders out there who have done this?
If you have done this are there any mods you would recommend?
What can I expect going from a 600 to a 300?

I'd like to improve my cornering so the upgrade I've been thinking about the most is going from the stock 110 front tire to a 120 and from the stock 140 rear tire to a 150 or 160. But I have no clue what that will do to the R3. I also hear the R6 throttle tube upgrade is something people really like to do to the R3, Why is that? Thanks for taking the time to give me your advice!
 

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Hi there, I've got a Street Triple R 675 and I'm on my second R3.

I brought the R3 as a commuter to keep the mileage off of the Street Triple, then started working from home, so turned the R3 into my track bike.

I'd leave the tyres at their stock sizes if I were you. The benefits of the original sizes is greater agility compared to larger bikes, and in my opinion, by putting wider tyres on, you'll only make the handling worse.

With a pair of Road 5s fitted, on the track, I'm scraping the OEM footpegs well before there's even the slightest hint that I'm running out of grip. With a more sport oriented tyre, you'd probably find even more grip there.

In terms of mods, I have the R6 throttle tube. It makes it a slightly shorter throw at wide open throttle, which does make it a little bit easier to wind on when you're lent over, and your line is set, and you want to start rolling on the power. Some people absolutely rave about this modification, but it isn't an earth shattering difference in my opinion.

Most likely, the biggest difference you will find between your CBR and the R3 isn't the power difference but the braking performance. I spent serious money improving my R3's brakes. I probably wouldn't recommend going as overboard as I did, but a set of aftermarket sintered pads would probably be beneficial.

I know that this is an R3 message board, but I'd also recommend trying out the new RC390 and the Ninja 400 as well, as they both have slightly different takes on a small capacity sports bike. In my opinion, the R3 nicely splits the difference and fits somewhat in the middle of the more sports focused KTM and the more commuter friendly Kawasaki.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

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I've been riding over 13 years. Had an R6, then an R1, then a WR450 supermoto. R1 and sumo were 90% track. So I got the R3 to be a dedicated track bike; definitely not even riding the R3 to it's potential haha. Do it, it's a fun bike and you will learn a lot. Leave the tire sizes stock. Definitely do the R6 throttle mod, then upgrade as you see fit.

I'm taking a new approach with this one, upgrading whatever my biggest complaint/desire was after the last track day. Took it bone stock (minus tires, and the R6 throttle tube because I did that while riding it around town racking up miles for my break in service) and my biggest issue was the ergonomics, surprisingly. Did clip-ons and rear sets right away. But you might need something else if commuting/road tripping.
 

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I have street bikes of all sizes. The R3 is my race bike. I rode mine on the street once, to get a feel for what the bike was like before committing to the upgrade list ...

No question the R3 has less power than your 600 does (by a lot). But, the torque curve of the R3 has it making power in a useful rev range (unlike the 600 that makes a ton of power way up high and does nothing down low). The R3 is designed for day-to-day use, commuting, etc.

Stay with stock tire sizes, especially the 110 front - but if you are doing track days, not the stock tires! Dunlop Q3+ are a good choice. The 140 rear width is the best choice, although the 150 will work.

The R3's stock riding position is a lot more comfortable than that of your 600. If you want to do track days with the R3 then eventually you may have to change some of that. But - if you are just starting out - the stock stuff is fine to get started with.

Then ... Suspension. The R3's stock suspension is designed for normal street use. It's quite comfortable and forgiving, especially considering that the bike is built to a price. For racetrack use, it's too soft. This is where the money needs to be spent! LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your input! I'm going to pull the trigger on a new R3 in Sept-Oct if i can get my hands on a 2022 lol. if not ill put down a deposit on a 2023. Has anyone heard anything on the release date for the 2023 R3? I'll take your advice and go with the R6 throttle tube and feel out the rest of the mods. I watched a guy on youtube replace the front end of his 2016 R3 with a 2016 R6 front end. would the ABS be plug and play? Id be curious as to what that would do the the bikes ergonomics.

Here is the link.
 

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Putting an R6 front fork on an R3 is silly to the extreme. Here is a link to a stunted doing wheelies, jumps, hops, stoppies, burn outs, drifts, etc... On a bone stock unmodified, stock tired and geared Yamaha demo bike. The idea that you need to install dual disks to fix the R3 is B.S.

As far as the R6 fork being stronger than an R3? Sorry, but that ignores the reality that they share the same basic dimensions, tube diameter, etc... Further, the USD fork has not been proven stronger than the standard, since the standard legs and sliders are larger in diameter. Finally, the R6 fork has 15mm less travel BTW, and dampers programmed for the R6 mass and geometry. So, swap away... it's a grand waste of time, but hey, most mods are for show anyway.

R3:
Front: 41 mm fork
Front travel: 5.1 in. (130 mm) travel
Rake: 25° Trail: 3.7 in. (95 mm)
R6:
Front suspension system
Upside-down telescopic fork, Ø 41 mm
Front travel: 4.6" (115 mm)
Rake: 24° Trail: 3.8 in. (97 mm)

Last bit. The front tire is what stops the bike. The single disc will lock the front end and skid the tire, so more brakes do not equal better braking. Dual discs on a 425lb, 115hp bike with top speed in excess of 160mph are a given. Dual discs on a 365lb, 40hp machine with a top speed of 112mph are a heavy and pointless waste of time and effort.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Putting an R6 front fork on an R3 is silly to the extreme. Here is a link to a stunted doing wheelies, jumps, hops, stoppies, burn outs, drifts, etc... On a bone stock unmodified, stock tired and geared Yamaha demo bike. The idea that you need to install dual disks to fix the R3 is B.S.

As far as the R6 fork being stronger than an R3? Sorry, but that ignores the reality that they share the same basic dimensions, tube diameter, etc... Further, the USD fork has not been proven stronger than the standard, since the standard legs and sliders are larger in diameter. Finally, the R6 fork has 15mm less travel BTW, and dampers programmed for the R6 mass and geometry. So, swap away... it's a grand waste of time, but hey, most mods are for show anyway.

R3:
Front: 41 mm fork
Front travel: 5.1 in. (130 mm) travel
Rake: 25° Trail: 3.7 in. (95 mm)
R6:
Front suspension system
Upside-down telescopic fork, Ø 41 mm
Front travel: 4.6" (115 mm)
Rake: 24° Trail: 3.8 in. (97 mm)

Last bit. The front tire is what stops the bike. The single disc will lock the front end and skid the tire, so more brakes do not equal better braking. Dual discs on a 425lb, 115hp bike with top speed in excess of 160mph are a given. Dual discs on a 365lb, 40hp machine with a top speed of 112mph are a heavy and pointless waste of time and effort.

Thanks for the info! I'm really glad the community on here is so welcoming.
 

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Thanks for the info! I'm really glad the community on here is so welcoming.
Didn't intend to be harsh, BTW. Just sharing an opinion. Every weekend, R3's are tracked and raced, with none sporting more than a braided line and brake pad swap. Some do the Brembo caliper swap (radial caliper and master), but that's more for feel than performance. Performance mods applied by pro builders focus on reducing weight, adding a few horsepower, and tuning suspension (damping and springs). Most track only mods to maximize performance or for racing are not streetable (gutted exhaust, stripped lightweight fairings, etc...). There are a couple dual disc R3's around, all modded by street enthusiasts who have not tracked the end product.

That said, my perspective is that of one who purchased the R3 as an affordable performance machine to enjoy riding, with minimal drama and limited wrenching. Should I want more, I'll swap the R3 for something else, perhaps the R7 or Aprilia RS660, rather than try to make the little bike deliver what it was never intended to.

Keep the greasy side down and your head up! :cool:
 

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Hi, lots of good replies already but I'll give my $0.02
I had a 1987 CBR600 (Hurricane), a 1992 CBR600F2, a 1997 CBR900RR, and now have a 2015 Ducati 1200S Multistrada.
I originally bought the 2021 R3 because I wanted an under-400lb bike I could put on a hitch rack on the back of my RV to use as a way to get into town from the campgrounds (I hate towing things, and have since sold the RV).
My first first impression was that the bike has -waaay- less power than all of the bikes I mentioned above. However, it handles like a dream, and is super-fun as an around-town bike. I also have never rode track, so figured this is my opportunity to get on something that's not way over-powered and actually learn some riding skills, so I'm taking a class in Oct. I think the R3 is perfect for around town, and probably the track. If I'm going long distance, I'll hop on the Ducati. That bike sucks for around town because it's so big and heavy, so they really do compliment each other. It all comes down to what you're using it for, but the R3 has really grown on me and I love riding it.
 

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Hi, lots of good replies already but I'll give my $0.02
I had a 1987 CBR600 (Hurricane), a 1992 CBR600F2, a 1997 CBR900RR, and now have a 2015 Ducati 1200S Multistrada.
I originally bought the 2021 R3 because I wanted an under-400lb bike I could put on a hitch rack on the back of my RV to use as a way to get into town from the campgrounds (I hate towing things, and have since sold the RV).
My first first impression was that the bike has -waaay- less power than all of the bikes I mentioned above. However, it handles like a dream, and is super-fun as an around-town bike. I also have never rode track, so figured this is my opportunity to get on something that's not way over-powered and actually learn some riding skills, so I'm taking a class in Oct. I think the R3 is perfect for around town, and probably the track. If I'm going long distance, I'll hop on the Ducati. That bike sucks for around town because it's so big and heavy, so they really do compliment each other. It all comes down to what you're using it for, but the R3 has really grown on me and I love riding it.
I've always loved multis and thought they'd make a nice comfy around town bike.
 

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Maybe for some, but I keep all of the luggage on, and am 5'5" :) so tippy-toed. I'm fairly new to the Multi - have only logged 2000 miles, and feel that it's a serious enough bike that I almost always have boots and full riding gear. Much harder to move around, and hop on/off. The R3 is different - I'm flat-footed on it, it's light, and much easier for me to just hop on and roll a couple miles down main street for an errand. (375 vs 550lbs)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Didn't intend to be harsh, BTW. Just sharing an opinion. Every weekend, R3's are tracked and raced, with none sporting more than a braided line and brake pad swap. Some do the Brembo caliper swap (radial caliper and master), but that's more for feel than performance. Performance mods applied by pro builders focus on reducing weight, adding a few horsepower, and tuning suspension (damping and springs). Most track only mods to maximize performance or for racing are not streetable (gutted exhaust, stripped lightweight fairings, etc...). There are a couple dual disc R3's around, all modded by street enthusiasts who have not tracked the end product.

That said, my perspective is that of one who purchased the R3 as an affordable performance machine to enjoy riding, with minimal drama and limited wrenching. Should I want more, I'll swap the R3 for something else, perhaps the R7 or Aprilia RS660, rather than try to make the little bike deliver what it was never intended to.

Keep the greasy side down and your head up! :cool:
Thanks i genuinely appreciate you putting in your $2c. im learning alot about this bike from your experiences. It's really helped me make the decision to want to buy an R3
 

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Front end on my race bike is: Stock fork inner and outer tubes (required by rulebook), Ohlins NIX22 cartridge internals, stock brake calipers (required by rulebook), stock master cylinder (required by rulebook), stock brake rotor (rulebook allows swapping to aftermarket but I've not bothered because there's no need), Galfer braided brake line, good quality DOT5.1 brake fluid. I don't remember what brake pads are in it ... I think they're EBC. That's it. Works very well.

You do not need dual front disks, and the forks are plenty strong enough for what they are called upon to do!

Brake lines are cheap, good quality brake fluid is even cheaper. The Ohlins bits are pricey but this is a race bike and it needs that. Street bike, or someone just starting out with track days, you don't need it.

FWIW the R6 throttle tube is a good thing to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Front end on my race bike is: Stock fork inner and outer tubes (required by rulebook), Ohlins NIX22 cartridge internals, stock brake calipers (required by rulebook), stock master cylinder (required by rulebook), stock brake rotor (rulebook allows swapping to aftermarket but I've not bothered because there's no need), Galfer braided brake line, good quality DOT5.1 brake fluid. I don't remember what brake pads are in it ... I think they're EBC. That's it. Works very well.

You do not need dual front disks, and the forks are plenty strong enough for what they are called upon to do!

Brake lines are cheap, good quality brake fluid is even cheaper. The Ohlins bits are pricey but this is a race bike and it needs that. Street bike, or someone just starting out with track days, you don't need it.

FWIW the R6 throttle tube is a good thing to do.
Awesome thanks for sharing your set up! How do you feel about the tire width?
 
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