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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up my R3 this morning. I've been riding it all day, trying to learn the basics of riding.

I've put 40 miles on the bike so far today, and the base of my palms / wrist are hurting pretty **** bad. My grip is pretty loose, so I'm not death gripping the bars or anything, but it just feels like all my weight is on my palms.

I've tried sitting up straight, and that helps a little, but that position doesn't feel natural to me.

I'm 6'1", 200lbs. Is this normal for a new rider? Do I just need to suck it up and eventually my body will get used to the position? Do I need to adjust the bike?

I dunno, any advice would be appreciated, I had to stop riding my hands hurt so bad.
 

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The R3 is probably the most comfortable bike I have ever ridden. You are new, so you are not used to riding. In time, you will be able to ride longer, and you won't have the discomfort you are feeling now. Sometimes my left hand hurts if I am using the clutch too much in-town, but that's about the only thing that ever bothers me. And it takes awhile before it starts hurting. Body position is important, but on the R3, it's really not a factor. The R3 is ridiculously comfortable and upright. Go ride an R6, and then get back on your R3.
You will HATE the R6.
The only thing I can say is.... keep riding!
 

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Hmm, that is strange. Normally it would be the shorter guys who would be leaning in more putting weight on the palms. You are 6'1", I would figure you would be sitting a lot more upright.

Although the R3 is more lenient and not so aggressive compared to bigger "super" sport bikes, weight on your hands unfortunately is par for the course on such bikes.

In most cases, your body will adapt to this and theoretically it shouldn't bother you later on when it does adapt.
 
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The R3 is probably the most comfortable bike I have ever ridden. You are new, so you are not used to riding. In time, you will be able to ride longer, and you won't have the discomfort you are feeling now. Sometimes my left hand hurts if I am using the clutch too much in-town, but that's about the only thing that ever bothers me. And it takes awhile before it starts hurting. Body position is important, but on the R3, it's really not a factor. The R3 is ridiculously comfortable and upright. Go ride an R6, and then get back on your R3.
You will HATE the R6.
The only thing I can say is.... keep riding!
God I really hate the R6. Is there any other Japanese bike on the market with as much or more aggressive stance? So uncomfortable for street riding.
 

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God I really hate the R6. Is there any other Japanese bike on the market with as much or more aggressive stance? So uncomfortable for street riding.
TRUTH!

I got to test-ride an R6 the same time I test-rode the R3.
I was literally 2 minutes into the test-ride and I wanted OFF that R6! I hated everything about it. One thing I learned from riding the R6: my CBR1000RR is worlds better in every way!
:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the advice. 95% of my riding has been in the neighborhood. So lots of clutch work. That probably doesn't help much. Perhaps if it was more open road it wouldn't have had such an initial impact. Time to suck it up!
 
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God I really hate the R6. Is there any other Japanese bike on the market with as much or more aggressive stance? So uncomfortable for street riding.
I rode a Honda RC51 and couldn't wait to off it and I'm use to aggressive riding positions.
 

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I liked the position of my 09 zx6r. I do have bad posture though so leaned forward isn't a bad thing for me.

Op: sometimes new riders think they are not death gripping when in reality they are. I went through this and I am sure a few new riders go through it as well. On top of that, when you first start riding, you may not have the endurance for longer rides. I myself think the r3 is a pretty relaxed ride. It's comparable to a lot of the more upright bikes imo. Bikes like the fz07/09, N650 Etc come to mind.
 

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@OP: Being on the taller side, it might be possible you are locking your arms with straight elbows and supporting your entire upper body weight onto your hands/grips. Making sure you have a slight bend of the arms at the elbows helps keep that weight off the palms of your hands. Your arms and shoulders will feel less road vibration too. Then, all you have to do is control the "Kung Fu" grip.

Randy
 

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This is common on motorcycles and bicycles. You're unconsciously using your hands to support your weight, and they will hurt/fall asleep. Once you're comfortable with riding start supporting yourself with your core (abs & back) -- which will make the hand issues disappear. As throttle/clutch/brake control are dependent on feeling in your hands, carrying with your core will be a key part of your ride.
 

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To be honest, this bike was not built for taller riders, specifically ectomorphs. Sure, you can make it work, but I found it to be extremely uncomfortable - my knees hated me. Also, for spirited rides, you really have to work to get into an aggressive position on the stock R3. Keep in mind, I'm built like a classic ectomorph. Although, I'm not that tall (5'11-6'0), but I do have long arms/legs. For this phenotype, the stock ergos will not do. I've mentioned this in other threads, but my solution was to raise the stock seat height (2" higher), swap out the clip ons, and move the rearsets back. I like it much better with the new ergonomics, and it's so much more comfortable, and agressive.

You may be thinking, "How is it possible to have such an aggressive seating position on the bike and be comfortable at the same time?" Easy! Strengthen your lower back, everyone is capable of doing this. As many know, you need to hug the tank with your knees, and hold your torso up with your core muscles (which includes your lower back). Your arms should be loose and relaxed - imagine holding (baby) chicks in both palms. The bars are there to steer the motorcycle. All this is possible with the improved ergonomics provided by my upgrades. Couldn't do this on a stock R3, I tried.
 

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Also it helps if you use your core to stabilize your upper body. Try using your legs to squeeze the tank and your lower back will be supporting the weight of your upper body. The only pressure on the handle bars should be counter steering inputs and a very light squeeze to keep your hands on the bars.


Your back may get sore until you are used to it but your palms/wrists should not be.
 
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