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Hi I’m New to the r3, even though I have owned it since new. I have a 2016 Movistar edition. Stock standard. It now has about 5500 kms on the odo.
I think it’s a great bike, but think there’s scope for improvement.
The brakes aren’t great. The suspension is soft. I run 38 psi front and rear tire. I’m a confident rider but don’t push my luck. I like the torque but it only really kicks in at 7k upwards. Low end sucks. I haven’t doubled yet so cannot comment about putting another 80kg on the back.
The clock doesn’t keep the time. And I find the oil light flashes. I only use genuine yamaha oil and filters.
Does anyone have any ideas how to make this bike a little more predictable without going crazy spending thousands on aftermarket parts. I’m not looking for a loud slip on bu there’s definitely restriction from the exhaust and it’s obviously for emission control.
many ideas would be helpful from your experience.
Thanks.
 

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To make it "predictable" you will have to spend a thousand on suspension at least. However the question is do you really need it? If you aren't keeping the bike, don't do it. Larger displacement motorcycles have better suspension in stock if you decide to upgrade to one soon and that extra thousand dollars will do you nicely. I personally can justify suspension upgrade if you are planning taking it to the track. As for the brakes, I don't believe you can make brakes better with little investment, maybe only slightly better by swapping stock brake pads to sintered ones. Braided brakes lines won't do much good either, it's a waste of money. Also this bike will not comfortably handle a passenger. It will do the job though, transporting you both from point A to point B but that would be a very sloppy job. I stopped taking passengers after a few rides and removed passenger footpegs.
I'd say enjoy the motorcycle mostly as it is or spend thousands on it to have the best out of it. You can make a very predictable street/track ready beast machine on the rails but at quite a big expense.

PS 38 psi is a bit too much I think. In hot weather 25+ degrees celsius that psi will easily cross 40psi mark while riding due to heat and that in my opinion is plain dangerous in terms of traction.
 

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One thing at a time ...

"The brakes aren't great." The stock (mandated by roadracing rulebook to use stock brake calipers, brake rotor, and master cylinder) brakes on my race bike have great lever feel and I can lift the rear wheel off the ground using the front brake. Three things have been changed. 1, braided steel brake line (from Norton Motorsports); 2, good quality brake fluid with a good, thorough bleeding job to get ALL the air bubbles out; 3, a decent set of new brake pads - although the stock ones were fine. Also make sure the pivot bushing for the brake lever has a wee dab of waterproof grease on it upon assembly so that it moves freely without any sticking feel. Maybe you need to do some maintenance.

"The suspension is soft." Yes, the stock suspension is pretty soft. Go look through the "Suspension" section of these forums; a number of options are discussed. My race bike has an Ohlins shock and Ohlins fork internals ... you may not need to go that far, particularly with the fork internals, there are some other options. With this done, it works very well. Bear in mind ... that which is worth doing, is worth doing right, once. Halfhearted job ... means you may end up doing it twice. Once the first time. Then again when you realise that you really do need to do it right.

"38 psi front and rear tire" - I am going to guess that this is for the stock tires, which are good for longevity but not much else. And you are running the pressure way too high. Try 30 - 32 first. And replace the tires with "something good". For a street bike ... not a lot wrong with Dunlop Q3+. They will not last as long as the stock tires, and they might not be as good in the rain (not sure) ... but they will be better in just about every other way.

"... it only really kicks in at 7k rpm and upwards". Yes, it is a small-displacement engine that makes power with revs ... and revs within redline won't hurt it. That's the way it is. Rev it! (Mine is never below 7000 rpm except when puttering through the paddock)

"Clock doesn't keep the time" that I can't help with but if it's resetting to zero upon start-up, check battery terminals, possibly needs a new battery. (Low voltage)

"Oil light flashes" - the oil-change reminder light on the black-and-white LCD display, or the red oil pressure warning light? If it's the oil-change reminder, you need to reset it! If it's the red oil pressure warning light, you seriously need to investigate why, to establish whether the engine really has low oil pressure (big problem), or whether the pressure switch is faulty (easy fix), or you have a loose/short/grounded/fault in the wiring harness.

Sort out the maintenance issues before you spend money on stuff.
 

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I'll chime a reminder that the clock has a sequence to follow to the letter when resetting it... or it won't reset properly. Not difficult to follow the Owner's Manual, but it has to be done properly. The same can be said for resetting the "oil change reminder". Yamaha's official site (for your part of the world) will have a free PDF of the owners manual, if you need it.
 
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