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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I have just finished getting all of my protecting gear and completed both the beginner and advanced MSF courses and I am now looking for my first actual bike upgrade. I have $250 to spend on it, which i know is not much, but I know there are upgrades out there in that price range.

What do you guys think? (i.e. bluetooth, tires...etc.)
 

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Hey guys, I have just finished getting all of my protecting gear and completed both the beginner and advanced MSF courses and I am now looking for my first actual bike upgrade. I have $250 to spend on it, which i know is not much, but I know there are upgrades out there in that price range.

What do you guys think? (i.e. bluetooth, tires...etc.)
Well, that's a fine Can of Worms you've opened up there, eh?

Discuss! And entertain!
 

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If you don't already have one, and you ever ride with others or like listening to music or make phone calls. I'd highly recommend getting a sena bluetooth.
 

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Take the wife 'n' kids out to dinner to show them how swell you think they are for letting you get a bike.
Or (in the event that you don't have a wife or kids), do what Yamamama said. :)
It's recommendable to buy performance knick-knacks before bling.
T-Rav wins. This is the first thing I did (no kids).. after a four hour ride of course. Gots to have your priorities straight!
 

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Brake lines and better pads, or springs, emulators, preload adjusters and appropriate oil for your weight for the front end.

Brakes and suspension are the two things that will make the bike safer and more fun to ride!

Sure the other stuff listed will make the bike look pretty, but a fender eliminator, shorty levers, flush mount turn signals, etc... won't do anything to make the bike more fun to ride.

Plus, if you do the work yourself, you learn how to take care of the bike, if you don't already know.
 

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Make an extra principal payment on your bike loan! Save on interest down the line, and pay-off your ride sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Love all the suggestions guys & gals. Thank you tons! I was watching this video in which CA HWY PTRL was cracking down on some bikers for fender eliminators and lights. Does anyone have any personal experience with what mods can be done to the R3 legally? Or am I just taking the risk for any visual mods? I am leaning towards the brakes and suspension upgrades because they are not as visible.
 

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I agree with the guys who said brakes and suspension, but I have to agree more with Aufitt. Ride the bike stock for a couple months and get used to it, then use that $250 to get yourself to a track day and get some coaching (coaching is free at a track day, you can ask for an instructor to help you as much as you want). You will learn more in 1 day at the race track with some coaching than a year of riding on the streets, and you will be a much safer, better rider, and be more prepared for the unexpected.

It's hard to resist the flashing pretty things when you get a new bike, but be smart, take the advice of the guys who have been doing this awhile and make yourself and your bike safer and more fun to ride before you make it pretty. Wouldn't you rather be the sleeper with the stock exhaust and scraped up knee pucks than to have all the flashy bolt-ons and a crashed bike? Being able to avoid laying it down because you have some proper training and a bike that is setup properly may save your life. Take riding seriously. 70% of motorcycle accidents occur within the first 90 days of ownership, and of those, 92% of riders are self taught or learned from family and friends. It's not coincidence. You won't react properly until you learn how.

my .02
 

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I agree with the guys who said brakes and suspension, but I have to agree more with Aufitt. Ride the bike stock for a couple months and get used to it, then use that $250 to get yourself to a track day and get some coaching (coaching is free at a track day, you can ask for an instructor to help you as much as you want). You will learn more in 1 day at the race track with some coaching than a year of riding on the streets, and you will be a much safer, better rider, and be more prepared for the unexpected.

It's hard to resist the flashing pretty things when you get a new bike, but be smart, take the advice of the guys who have been doing this awhile and make yourself and your bike safer and more fun to ride before you make it pretty. Wouldn't you rather be the sleeper with the stock exhaust and scraped up knee pucks than to have all the flashy bolt-ons and a crashed bike? You'll probably lay it down soon anyway and it won't be pretty anymore. And being able to avoid laying it down because you have some proper training and a bike that is setup properly may save your life. 70% of motorcycle accidents occur within the first 90 days of ownership, and of those, 92% of riders are self taught or learned from family and friends. It's not coincidence. You won't react properly until you learn how.

my .02
I agree with everything that you said except for that “You’ll probably lay it down soon anyway…”

The whole Mantra of “There are only two types of riders, those who have crashed and those who are going to crash” is so often repeated that people started believing it.

I’ve ridden motorcycles for 51 years and have yet to crash. I’m talking about Street riding only (I don’t count Dirt riding because it IS certain that all Dirt riders will crash, probably often if you’re doing it right). The only thing that ever happened to me was having a stationary bike fall over as I was getting off of it because I didn’t put the kickstand all the way down. No injury to me (except a temporarily bruised Ego) and the bike wasn’t damaged at all. Just a bit embarrassing, but no-one was around to see it happen. I picked up the bike and then started laughing at myself.

I also know riders who have been riding much longer than me, and some touring riders who have put many hundreds of thousands of miles on their bikes over the years, who have never crashed. I'd say, of all the riders I know, only maybe 15% of them have had any sort of crash while street riding.

The riders I have known who have crashed were all, without exception, very aggressive street riders. One died, one had to have an arm amputated. The smarter of these aggressive riders wised up eventually, realized what the future had in store for them if they continued riding that way and started riding on the track only. The others, well, I stopped riding with them. They’ve probably all crashed, possibly multiple times, and possibly with bad consequences.

Telling new riders that they’re probably going to crash soon will just instill fear in some of them and maybe even cause some to quit riding. That’s not helpful. That’s like when people keep asking someone who’s about to perform in front of a crowd, “Are you nervous?”, “Are you nervous?’, “I’d be nervous.” Then the person finally answers “Well, I am NOW!”

"Aren't you scared of crashing?". "I'd be scared of crashing." "Everybody crashes". "You should be scared of crashing." Well, s#*!, he is NOW.

Telling them to get some training, wear all the gear all the time, do a California Superbike School course and some track days, and to be hyper-vigilant when around traffic (particularly at intersections, crossroads, side roads, etc.), slow down and be more alert when riding at night or at dawn and dusk, etc., now, that’s helpful.

I saved a post from a few years ago that really stunned me. In it the guy wrote:

“You will eventually drop the bike, crash, wipe out, highside, lowside, skid, go over the handlebars, go off the back, forget the kickstand, have a flat, run out of gas, blow up an engine, hit a rabbit, break a chain, have an oil hose spit all over your leg, hit a car, get rear ended, rip your muffler off on a pothole, and do a wheelie so high it scares the crap out of you.

At least in the last 35 years I've managed to do all those things.”



I’ve never done any of those things except for that pesky kickstand thing. That one I can say MOST riders will do at some time, if they ride for many years.

According to the Mantra, I’m due for a crash sometime in my future. Since I’ve gotten away with not crashing for so long, does that mean I’m overdue? I think not. I certainly don’t ride like I believe that to be true. I’ve done, and/or still do, all the things I mentioned up above as being helpful.

I also practice at some riding technique every time I get out there. One ride I’ll drill myself on fast, controlled stops. Next time on counter-steering, then lane positioning, slow turns, rev-matching, swerving, etc.

I want new riders to become life-long members of the motorcycling community, not to scare them off by telling them they're probably going to crash soon, or at least at some point. I’d rather try to encourage them to get the skills they need to avoid crashing, and possibly becoming a statistic, and instead finding a hobby they can safely enjoy for the rest of their lives.

Is a crash possible? Certainly, and it's best to not get complacent about that. Is a crash inevitable? Definitely not.

I’m now stepping down off the soapbox…..til next time. :eek:
 

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I agree with everything that you said except for that “You’ll probably lay it down soon anyway…”

The whole Mantra of “There are only two types of riders, those who have crashed and those who are going to crash” is so often repeated that people started believing it.

I’ve ridden motorcycles for 51 years and have yet to crash. I’m talking about Street riding only (I don’t count Dirt riding because it IS certain that all Dirt riders will crash, probably often if you’re doing it right). The only thing that ever happened to me was having a stationary bike fall over as I was getting off of it because I didn’t put the kickstand all the way down. No injury to me (except a temporarily bruised Ego) and the bike wasn’t damaged at all. Just a bit embarrassing, but no-one was around to see it happen. I picked up the bike and then started laughing at myself.

I also know riders who have been riding much longer than me, and some touring riders who have put many hundreds of thousands of miles on their bikes over the years, who have never crashed. I'd say, of all the riders I know, only maybe 15% of them have had any sort of crash while street riding.

The riders I have known who have crashed were all, without exception, very aggressive street riders. One died, one had to have an arm amputated. The smarter of these aggressive riders wised up eventually, realized what the future had in store for them if they continued riding that way and started riding on the track only. The others, well, I stopped riding with them. They’ve probably all crashed, possibly multiple times, and possibly with bad consequences.

Telling new riders that they’re probably going to crash soon will just instill fear in some of them and maybe even cause some to quit riding. That’s not helpful. That’s like when people keep asking someone who’s about to perform in front of a crowd, “Are you nervous?”, “Are you nervous?’, “I’d be nervous.” Then the person finally answers “Well, I am NOW!”

"Aren't you scared of crashing?". "I'd be scared of crashing." "Everybody crashes". "You should be scared of crashing." Well, s#*!, he is NOW.

Telling them to get some training, wear all the gear all the time, do a California Superbike School course and some track days, and to be hyper-vigilant when around traffic (particularly at intersections, crossroads, side roads, etc.), now, that’s helpful.

I saved a post from a few years ago that really stunned me. In it the guy wrote:

“You will eventually drop the bike, crash, wipe out, highside, lowside, skid, go over the handlebars, go off the back, forget the kickstand, have a flat, run out of gas, blow up an engine, hit a rabbit, break a chain, have an oil hose spit all over your leg, hit a car, get rear ended, rip your muffler off on a pothole, and do a wheelie so high it scares the crap out of you.

At least in the last 35 years I've managed to do all those things.”



I’ve never done any of those things except for that pesky kickstand thing. That one I can say MOST riders will do at some time, if they ride for many years.

According to the Mantra, I’m due for a crash sometime in my future. Since I’ve gotten away with not crashing for so long, does that mean I’m overdue? I think not. I certainly don’t ride like I believe that to be true. I’ve done, and/or still do, all the things I mentioned up above as being helpful.

I also practice at some riding technique every time I get out there. One ride I’ll drill myself on fast, controlled stops. Next time on counter-steering, then lane positioning, slow turns, rev-matching, swerving, etc.

I want new riders to become life-long members of the motorcycling community, not to scare them off by telling them they're probably going to crash soon, or at least at some point. I’d rather try to encourage them to get the skills they need to avoid crashing, and possibly becoming a statistic, and instead finding a hobby they can enjoy for the rest of their lives.

I’m now stepping down off the soapbox…..til next time. :eek:
Thank you Fang, actually you're totally right. I shouldn't have put it that way. I edited my original response.

But the point I was driving home is still the same, most people who ride a motorcycle, or drive a car, or a bicycle, or a skateboard, or whatever, will eventually face a situation that could cause a crash, and being more skilled at whatever it is, will make you more likely to be able to avoid crashing than if you aren't skilled and you have chrome frame sliders or a tidy tail.

And I do believe that most motorcycle crashes are the responsibility of the rider to be aware and take responsibility for their riding and their surroundings. Regardless of whether the other driver saw you or not, you should have been ready in case they didn't. You're on a small, fast vehicle that's hard to see and people aren't always looking for and is particularly susceptible to road hazards. So if they crossed your path and hit you because you weren't ready for them not to see you, that's your responsibility, just like if you come ripping around a corner and hit a patch of gravel you didn't expect to be there, that's your responsibility for not riding at a pace that would allow you to react...IMO.

Anyways, obviously not everyone crashes, someone has to make up the other side of the statistics, but a lot do because they don't take riding seriously, that's all.
 
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