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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I grew up with an awesome family as both my Dad and brother were very mechanically inclined and DIYers. Both are no longer with us unfortunately. My Dad lived a full life and passed at 73 in 2008 but my bro died young at 34 in 1997. But what an impression they made.

The reason I am mentioned this. They gave me a great foundation, and while I am not as talented as them, at least I am not helpless as many of my friends. My Dad was more of a carpenter and home project guy. My brother was amazing at car stereos and security, and a very good car & motorcycle mechanic. He used to love working on my bike and I wished I had learned more from him because one thing I lack is patience and he'd do things for me when I got frustrated.

So this is why I am still learning and reading books on the subject. Regardless of skill level, it is always good to have references around. I did a little comparison shopping and this book had really good reviews on Amazon and for like $15, I think it was a steal. It came out in 2007 so it is pretty relevant. Sometimes I jump headlong into projects and like on my last bike, a Honda CBR600RR, I had a harder time putting it back especially without any help like my brother or a reference book.

This book is a simple paperbook and measures around a standard 8.5 X 11. It is pretty sturdy too and will survive some abuse as books like these get touched by greasy hands and are tossed around the garage. It has clear and helpful pictures and good instruction. You can see that in the pics. The language doesn't get all condescending nor too simplistic. I'd say it's a good balance.

It doesn't delve into deep topics but give good basic information on the inner workings of bikes and their systems. Furthermore, it has instructions on about every project you'll need and be doing on your bike and then some. It covers all types of bikes, not just sport bikes but even belt drives, and so on. It covers things such as changing oil, to adding stainless steel brake lines, to installing an aftermarket full exhaust system, to putting in a Power Commander 5. Again, it has about every project that any of us will want to do to our bikes.

I would highly recommend it especially if you're a neophyte or luddite, a beginner or intermediate. Advanced mechanics or pros need not look. Even if you have some experience or are confident you can figure most stuff out, for $15, it is almost stupid not to have on hand when you might need it. It can help you troubleshoot those **** gremlins that run around our increasingly more complex bikes.

Here are some pics, albeit hasty ones, of the cover, index, and some of the project chapter covers that should give a better idea of the book's contents than my poor description.

Hope you liked the review. Would make a great Holiday Gift for your favortire rice rocketeer or gear-head.:)

















 

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That'll be a good read for anyone just starting out on their M/C life.
 

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That'll be a good read for anyone just starting out on their M/C life.
For someone just starting it might help, but honestly some of it looks like a compilation of the install pamphlets that aftermarket stuff comes with.

A good buy for $15, but for me, a service manual (pdf for faster searches), already included install pamphlets, and the occasional YouTube video have gotten me by.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That'll be a good read for anyone just starting out on their M/C life.
YES, INDEED.

For someone just starting it might help, but honestly some of it looks like a compilation of the install pamphlets that aftermarket stuff comes with.

A good buy for $15, but for me, a service manual (pdf for faster searches), already included install pamphlets, and the occasional YouTube video have gotten me by.
Yeah, that is basically what it is. I'm pretty mechanically inclined and delve into stuff sometimes without such knowledge but prefer to read up on things. Even as a Master's student in Comp Sci, & as an IT worker, I have a lot of school books & IT cert study books in .pdf versions for my iPad, yet I still prefer a paper book in some instances. Jotting notes in the sides, feeling the paper in your hand.

YouTube videos are a great resource and I use them as well. But again, sometimes, it is nice to have a book there you can glance at instead of referring back to parts of a video no matter how invaluable.

Truthfully, I was expecting more. It is basically for the beginner to early intermediate. I was hoping it would delve more into detail about how things work but that isn't the main focus. It is a general overview of all the maintenance and aftermarket changes you'd make to it. It is a good value and does provide some nuggets you might not know. Overall, I'd recommend it as I said before.
 

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YES, INDEED.



Yeah, that is basically what it is. I'm pretty mechanically inclined and delve into stuff sometimes without such knowledge but prefer to read up on things. Even as a Master's student in Comp Sci, & as an IT worker, I have a lot of school books & IT cert study books in .pdf versions for my iPad, yet I still prefer a paper book in some instances. Jotting notes in the sides, feeling the paper in your hand.

YouTube videos are a great resource and I use them as well. But again, sometimes, it is nice to have a book there you can glance at instead of referring back to parts of a video no matter how invaluable.

Truthfully, I was expecting more. It is basically for the beginner to early intermediate. I was hoping it would delve more into detail about how things work but that isn't the main focus. It is a general overview of all the maintenance and aftermarket changes you'd make to it. It is a good value and does provide some nuggets you might not know. Overall, I'd recommend it as I said before.
I personally print out the the parts of service manuals that I think I will be working on the most. I keep those portions in a binder in the garage. Examples of these are the chapters for fork adjustments, shock adjustments, torque specs, etc.
 

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Can't find one(asked on this site already) for the R3. The Kawasakis I owned before all had readily available pdf manuals online. So if you need a 2013 650, 2009 and 2006 zx6r manual, let me know lol.
 
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