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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my review after two days of riding my new 2015 Yamaha R3. I'm trying not to gush too much. Honest. :D

I now have 300 kms on the bike and I just picked it up Saturday afternoon. I have to say - I absolutely love it. You got to ride this bike if you haven't done so already. Of course - you SHOULD love a new bike, right? But this one seems different. It's just so good in so many little ways for the price. Yamaha did their homework and you can see and feel it. Usually, you love a new bike, and then over the next few days start to notice little things that take away a bit of the initial enchantment. You gradually adopt a broader perspective, and a more realistic appraisal of the bike's benefits and drawbacks. With the R3, the more I ride it and increase my familiarity with it - the more impressed I become. I really liked it when I rode it twice at Americade this summer. But living with it for the past couple of days has been a positive eye-opener. It's the little details. Yamaha clearly hit a homerun with it. I just can't figure out how they produced a bike that exudes such quality, power, character, and refinement for $4999. To think that is the price I paid for my CBR250R back in 2011, is telling. The R3 just blows the CBR out of the water in terms of refinement, build quality, power, features, and character. I had friend (Steve) who has owned countless bikes over the years, take it for a spin. After his short ride, he said he couldn't help but wonder how Yamaha produced a bike this good, for so little. He was going to buy one (the one I ended up buying!) before our local dealer convinced me that I really should be the one to purchase it. Steve admitted that it was even better than he thought it would be after his short test ride. I'm still trying to figure out where they cheaped-out on it. It must be the best new small displacement deal going in Canada. Particularly, when it's $4990 in the U.S., and you take a look at our dollar currently.

What strikes me too about the R3 is that it has Honda-like refinement - but with an extra dose of character. I'm not used to Yamaha switchgear feeling so buttery-smooth. Yamaha out-Honda'd, Honda here I think. The refinement makes me feel like I'm riding a Honda product. And there are lots of thoughtful touches (sight-glass oil window, flash to pass button, gear indicator, instantaneous fuel economy readout, and plastic shroud around fuel tank (no more metal tank scratches, I can just replace some cheap shiny plastic when scratches appear) to name just a few. The mirrors still reveal only my elbows, but all my bikes have been the same - so I've learned to just tuck my elbows in when peering behind. Yesterday, I rode a friend's (Ron) Ninja 300. Ron has had more bikes than anyone I know over the years. He feels that his Ninja 300 is the perfect bike for him and uses accolades similar to the ones I've attached to the R3 here, to describe the Ninja. Both the Ninja and R3 resemble each other in many ways, with the Ninja setting the example and establishing the bar, when it first came out. Still, it seems a little unfair to compare them because Yamaha had a clear target to shoot for and considerable time to prepare their assault on the little Ninja. With that said, it was like Yamaha went after the Kawi with a fine-toothed comb and just polished and slightly refined all the little bits that were still so well executed on the little green bike. The R3 has a little more torque, a slightly fattened midrange, is slightly more refined, with a little more power. Ron thought that the throttle felt more responsive than the Ninja. But the Ninja still holds its own too. Both the slipper clutch and firmer suspension work better for spirited riding, and the little Ninja shows character in the upper register, sporting a 500 RPM higher redline. The R3 howls too, especially above 9000 RPM where it begins to snarl angrily. I let Ron ride it and he agreed - it has this infectious growl after 9000 rpm to redline. It's that character high up in the rev range that suddenly makes me feel like I'm riding a Moto GP bike. And everything just seems so tight, solid, and buttoned-down on it too - yet quiet and composed when you're not constantly cranking on it. It turns about 7000 RPM @ 104 km/hr on the highway, and is just very smooth and vibration-free for cruising.

I've heard criticisms about the suspension - and I have to agree that it's a bit soft. If you corner in a very spirited way - the chassis is more likely to be upset - especially when frost heaves and road cracks are present. The Ninja's suspension is noticeably firmer. No criticisms in terms of passing power though. It is effortless for both. I remember Steve saying that he didn't think he would ever need more power than the R3 could dole out. I really like the sound of the engine too. Turbine-like, with character. In terms of handling, It doesn't quite match the ol' girl CBR150R, partly because of the extra weight, slightly larger size, and wider rubber, but it still handles very well, and it's much more composed on the highway. It feels like a much larger, more mature motorcycle in this way. And the seating position is excellent. When I rode it this summer, it just felt like Yamaha used my likeness when they were making ergonomic decisions. This used to be some kind of magic that Honda was good at. It just feels right to my 5', 9" (195 lb) frame when I sit on it. It feels a lot like my CBR150R, only slightly MORE upright. My arms haven't been the least bit tired riding around town. And I rode it for a couple of hours straight yesterday - and my butt wasn't sore either.

One area where I think Yamaha could have improved is with the signals. They just look like a throw-back to the early 2000s, large, bulky and noticeably anachronistic compared to the modern, sporty look of the rest of the bike. Completely out of place on what is otherwise a great looking bike. Like Yamaha picked them out from an old parts bin somewhere. I think Kawi achieved a much more cohesive and better integrated set up with their signals on the Ninja. I'll probably pick up some that are a little more sporty and look higher quality than the stock ones - in keeping with the rest of the bike. With that said - I don't have many goals for farkles. I'll get a rear rack. Maybe a speedo-healer (my bike reads about 8 km/hr faster that I'm actually traveling). A touring windscreen maybe. Though I'm surprised that the buffeting has been so minimal so far.

You know - new riders looking for a new small displacement bike are so spoiled currently. I think that's the bottom line. I can't believe the strides small displacement bikes have made over the last few years. It's hard to imagine what Kawasaki and Honda will do to one-up the R3 in the near future. Yet I'm quite certain they will. Honda is expected to release their 300 series twin likely next year. Online photos of the 250cc version (CBR250RR) recently released in Asian markets, look pretty stunning, and boasts 38 hp (at the crank) - so very competitive horsepower too. Many think it will be a 350 when it arrives in North America. It's about time we started to see some high quality being put in to the low displacement category. If the R3 is any indication of where the manufacturers plan to take small displacement bikes - I'm very excited about the future of motorcycling. You come to expect certain levels of quality, refinement, and performance for a given amount of cash. The R3 just exceeds expectations of what you can now get for $4999 when buying new.

P.S. One notable perk is that my insurance is actually $3 cheaper than with the CBR125R! With TD Insurance, I'm paying $245 per year (no collision/comprehensive).

Mike
 

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The R3 is made in Indonesia with some Chinese parts on it. That's how they keep the price down.
I would like to know which parts are actually made in Japan. ( Probably not too many. )
 

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Excellent write up! While this is my first bike, the only other bikes I rode were the CBR125 and the Ninja 250. The 125 I rode in the riding safety course and the 250 was a friends bike that he allowed me to ride around my neighbourhood for a few minutes. Neither could hold a candle to the R3.

I have to say I think the suspension is actually just right for me. I'm only 150 ish lbs and 5'6" so with the preload set at 2, it's seems just perfect. Again, not much of a basis for comparison though. I definitely want to upgrade the brake cables as I am finding that the brakes seem to lack a bit of feel (but stopping distances seem to be quite good).

I agree on the turn signals too! I ended up blowing my budget and buying a set of Yamaha Blinker Plus for the front and rear. Had to order them from Europe but they are awesome. Had a guy chase me down on Sunday and ask me about them, lol. But even in Canada the optional LED turns you can get are WAY better. I think overseas they have the same shape as ours but the lens is clear. Even that would have been better.

I'm betting Yamaha will introduce ABS at some point since its currently available overseas. Shame they didn't have that as an option at launch as I would have bought that for sure. Oh well! I love my little bike and think its just amazing.
 

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You and I have very different ideas of "brief" review ;)

I agree with most points though. 13k miles and a track day on mine since March and can't be any happier. My only big mods are swapping out the rear shock and higher rearsets, which made a night and day difference for spirited riding.

Great every day power and fuel efficiency for my commuting and it's still capable and fun when riding hard. You can definitely see where some corners were cut to keep down the price but overall quality is still surprisingly good.

I'm looking to hopefully hit 50,000 miles on it and then make it a dedicated track bike
 

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Like most people I'm always looking at or testing other bikes, but there have been too many days lately where my helmet has been too small for my grin on this one. Beyond the low price, insurance, and 60+ mpg, feeling at home in any kind of traffic and being hugely entertained by the top 1/3 of the powerband keeps making me fess up to myself that I'm really not going to have more fun on any other bike.

The only time I even think of other bikes is when I've been off the R3 for awhile, so I've declared the add-to-the-stable-itis all in my head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You and I have very different ideas of "brief" review ;)

I agree with most points though. 13k miles and a track day on mine since March and can't be any happier. My only big mods are swapping out the rear shock and higher rearsets, which made a night and day difference for spirited riding.

Great every day power and fuel efficiency for my commuting and it's still capable and fun when riding hard. You can definitely see where some corners were cut to keep down the price but overall quality is still surprisingly good.

I'm looking to hopefully hit 50,000 miles on it and then make it a dedicated track bike
Yeah - I started writing a few words, and then began to add to it a little more. Before I knew it, it wasn't a brief review anymore. But it captured much of what I wanted to say. :)

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Excellent write up! While this is my first bike, the only other bikes I rode were the CBR125 and the Ninja 250. The 125 I rode in the riding safety course and the 250 was a friends bike that he allowed me to ride around my neighbourhood for a few minutes. Neither could hold a candle to the R3.

I have to say I think the suspension is actually just right for me. I'm only 150 ish lbs and 5'6" so with the preload set at 2, it's seems just perfect. Again, not much of a basis for comparison though. I definitely want to upgrade the brake cables as I am finding that the brakes seem to lack a bit of feel (but stopping distances seem to be quite good).

I agree on the turn signals too! I ended up blowing my budget and buying a set of Yamaha Blinker Plus for the front and rear. Had to order them from Europe but they are awesome. Had a guy chase me down on Sunday and ask me about them, lol. But even in Canada the optional LED turns you can get are WAY better. I think overseas they have the same shape as ours but the lens is clear. Even that would have been better.

I'm betting Yamaha will introduce ABS at some point since its currently available overseas. Shame they didn't have that as an option at launch as I would have bought that for sure. Oh well! I love my little bike and think its just amazing.
BluebirdR3 - I can't believe how strange and out of place the stock signals look on the otherwise stunning R3. I've been looking at lots of aftermarket signals lately and reading through the threads on this forum. Are the Yamaha LED Blinker Plus signals the same as these ones?

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Yamaha-Genuine-LED-Indicators-Blinkers-MT-09-YZF-R1-R6-FZ6R-MT-07-Tenere-XT660-/301552312220?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_15&hash=item4635eb1f9c&rmvSB=true

Do they have resistors integrated into their wiring? Or would a relay be preferable? Whatever I pick - I generally prefer a "plug & play" type of install. Could I purchase the Yamaha LED Blinker Plus signals with some plug and play adapter harnesses for the front and rear? If so - I suspect I'll end up doing that. Cost be damned!!!

Sorry for all the questions - but really appreciate your advice here.

Mike
 

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BluebirdR3 - I can't believe how strange and out of place the stock signals look on the otherwise stunning R3. I've been looking at lots of aftermarket signals lately and reading through the threads on this forum. Are the Yamaha LED Blinker Plus signals the same as these ones?

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Yamaha-Genui...faultDomain_15&hash=item4635eb1f9c&rmvSB=true

Do they have resistors integrated into their wiring? Or would a relay be preferable? Whatever I pick - I generally prefer a "plug & play" type of install. Could I purchase the Yamaha LED Blinker Plus signals with some plug and play adapter harnesses for the front and rear? If so - I suspect I'll end up doing that. Cost be damned!!!

Sorry for all the questions - but really appreciate your advice here.

Mike
Hi Mike, no they don't have resistors built in, but they do come with resistors. And no, those ones are the LED Plus ones. Here is a video that shows them up close:


They are sold in pairs - one set for the fronts and one for the rears. They have all the hardware and wiring that comes with it and the directions aren't the best but since they are LED's its just a bit of trial and error to get them on. They fit perfectly and have the adapter plates for the front and rear as well so they sit nicely. They also have chrome or black plates. In the video you can see the hazard lights flashing but this wouldn't work on our bikes unless you do the hazard light mod (search it's been done by two guys but Capt Kirk's mod is easiest).

I ended up getting the TST industries LED relay and that worked like a charm (and its cheap). I will say installing the rears was a bit more of a pain because you have to think about how to thread the wiring and nuts in reverse order to get them on. Hard to explain until you see it but it wasn't hard - just a pain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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Nice! If you need help with the install let me know but it's pretty straightforward. The diagrams tell you which wire is ground on the bike and which are hot. You just need to get them setup on the bike properly. I think they literally just click on with the bullet connectors and there are 4 wires for each one. Shouldn't be hard. The stock ones come out easily in the front so start there. Rear is a little more fussy but still not hard if you have any common sense. Let us know how it goes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Nice! If you need help with the install let me know but it's pretty straightforward. The diagrams tell you which wire is ground on the bike and which are hot. You just need to get them setup on the bike properly. I think they literally just click on with the bullet connectors and there are 4 wires for each one. Shouldn't be hard. The stock ones come out easily in the front so start there. Rear is a little more fussy but still not hard if you have any common sense. Let us know how it goes!
Thanks for the heads-up and tips! I've installed aftermarket signals on my other bikes, so I'm hoping this will be reasonably straight-forward. My ridding buddy wires things for a living and offered to help out, so I'm in good hands! Ha..ha...

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Thanks for the heads-up and tips! I've installed aftermarket signals on my other bikes, so I'm hoping this will be reasonably straight-forward. My ridding buddy wires things for a living and offered to help out, so I'm in good hands! Ha..ha...

Mike
Well - I've installed the Yamaha Blinker Plus signals. Thanks for the feedback BluebirdR3!! These signals looks really stunning on the bike. It's like Yamaha initially planned to use these as stock indicators, then decided on a whim to throw on a late 90's version. These suit the bike so much better.

I didn't use the supplied adapters. My friend Ron convinced me that splicing the wires and using the stock connectors would be the best solution. So he cut, spliced, soldered, and heat shrinked all of them. He does these kinds of things for a living, so his work was flawless. Ron isn't much for hyperbole. Yet even he was impressed by how nice they look on the bike. And after our first ride with them yesterday, he mentioned to me that they are very bright and add a new dimension to the bike's looks. They are really eye-catching.

Here are a few photos of the new indicators on the bike.







Of course - one down at the marina with the Sleeping Giant in the background.



And here is one from the other side of the sleeping Nanabijou. At Sleeping Giant Provincial Park. The bike still has the stock indicators in this photo.



Still absolutely loving this bike. Did the first service myself a week or so ago. It's really hard to fault the R3. I think it helps to have lived through owning a variety of older bikes, to understand how well-balanced and good this bike truly is. I can see some new riders becoming spoiled and "bored" with it because they have nothing to compare it to. To me it just does most everything very well and is so well thought out. Yamaha has obsessively ruminated over many little details it seems. And my current average fuel economy is hovering around 72 mpg (Imperial) or 60 mpg U.S. which is really exceptional considering that figure includes lots of spirited acceleration.

Mike
 
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