Yamaha R3 Forums banner
1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
2015 Yamaha R3. Purchased 8-20-2021.
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have had my bike a few months and only have had a few lessons. I am great with the clutch and front braking. I have only gotten my feet on the pegs once because I have no clue what I’m doing so using the rear brake isn’t possible yet. I can hover my feet and ride the clutch only.
But I cannot hold the weight of the bike at all on one foot. I’ve dropped it 9 times and it’s really frustrating. So I’m afraid to give it throttle because when I am already stopped it falls over.
How on earth does anyone hold 365 lbs on one leg?!

It seems if I control the angle stopped it’s fine -but when it shifts balance unexpectedly I CANT hold it up

I have the brc next week and hope they can teach me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
The BRC sounds like a good idea. At least a qualified expert will be able to see what you're doing wrong and offer some advice.

I can only guess that you're leaning it over too far, as if the bike is close to its balance point it takes basically no effort to keep it upright. How tall are you?

The only other thing I can think of is that it sounds like you're using the front brake to come to a complete stop, which is also a big no no. If you use the front brake to come to a complete stop with the bars slightly off centre, it can cause you to suddenly drop the bike. The last tiny bit of the stop should usually be done with the back brake only.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2015 Yamaha R3. Purchased 8-20-2021.
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The BRC sounds like a good idea. At least a qualified expert will be able to see what you're doing wrong and offer some advice.

I can only guess that you're leaning it over too far, as if the bike is close to its balance point it takes basically no effort to keep it upright. How tall are you?

The only other thing I can think of is that it sounds like you're using the front brake to come to a complete stop, which is also a big no no. If you use the front brake to come to a complete stop with the bars slightly off centre, it can cause you to suddenly drop the bike. The last tiny bit of the stop should usually be done with the back brake only.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
Hi! I’m barely 5’2 with a 27” inseam. On the bike with the wide seat it’s way less.

I have not used the back brakes yet because I only got my feet up during one day of practice and not since then. Without using pegs there’s no access to the rear brake. What you said makes complete sense!!!!!

Hoping the MSF can teach me and the bikes are shorter and narrower. Therefore my inseam means more and I’ll be flat footed.
Part of my issue too is I have a partially frozen right ankle and had foot surgery two years ago so tip toeing is excruciatingly painful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
9 drops? That poor R3. can we get some pics of the damage? For you and your bikes well being, im going to suggest that maybe motorcycles are not for you?
 

·
Registered
2015 Yamaha R3. Purchased 8-20-2021.
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
9 drops? That poor R3. can we get some pics of the damage? For you and your bikes well being, im going to suggest that maybe motorcycles are not for you?
There’s no damage other than the foot peg. Sliders for the win!!

Maybe they’re not for me but I can’t cancel the class now. I originally only wanted the endorsement to be a better passenger so there’s always that. By the way- it’s hard to learn when you can’t reach the ground
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
There’s no damage other than the foot peg. Sliders for the win!!

Maybe they’re not for me but I can’t cancel the class now. I originally only wanted the endorsement to be a better passenger so there’s always that. By the way- it’s hard to learn when you can’t reach the ground
Im glad you and the bike are ok. Sliders were a good call. I can see you being an excellent R1 passenger. If you insist on being a rider, there are ways to lower the seat.
 

·
Registered
2015 Yamaha R3. Purchased 8-20-2021.
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Im glad you and the bike are ok. Sliders were a good call. I can see you being an excellent R1 passenger. If you insist on being a rider, there are ways to lower the seat.
Funny you say that. My hubby rides an R1 and I LOVE being his backpack and wanted to be a better one.
I’m in no rush to ride one myself even if I pass the class. For the rest of this year and spring would be closed course practice practice practice and I would get a lowering kit.

Also if I pass it will be proof to myself I need to modify my bike.

if I don’t pass I won’t beat myself up over it. Glad I tried!

and yes the bike is just about immaculate. No drop was while moving. That helped!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
Right? I remember seeing your bikes. From what youve posted( your size, the drops, your hubbys R1, ect), it just makes sense to me. Also going 2 up is an excellent bonding experience for couples.
 

·
Registered
2015 Yamaha R3. Purchased 8-20-2021.
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Right? I remember seeing your bikes. From what youve posted( your size, the drops, your hubbys R1, ect), it just makes sense to me. Also going 2 up is an excellent bonding experience for couples.
It really is. I told him if he wants to get the Yamaha sport touring to keep the R1 for himself and I’ll help pay for the Second bike we would always use together. 💜
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
At 5'3" myself, unless your legs are very short for your height, you really ought to be able to at least get the balls of both feet down, or flatfoot solidly on one with the other on tiptoe. I can almost flatfoot the R3 with both feet, and my legs are on the short side.

But I have to say if you can't get either foot down, it's not a bike to start on, and even as an experienced rider you'd want to ride it only at the track. Real world riding means stop signs on a steep slope (sometimes on wet pavement), lights turning red with no place to put your foot but in a hole, parking on very uneven surfaces with transition from pavement to stone, starting on wet grass, paddling on deep gravel, and many other situations where you need solid contact between foot and ground. At the track, you've got smooth pavement, a flat surface at your pit, and your pit crew to catch you there if you haven't mastered a moving mount/dismount (which is something you never ever ever want to do on the street). So don't let track riders tell you there's no bike too tall for you on the street. I spent probably half of my 200,000 miles (so far) on 600cc inline fours that were too tall for me, and I'm really, really over that whole experience.

If there is something you're doing wrong, the MSF instructors will spot it. I'm so glad you're taking the class. I recommend it to everyone, plus a refresher for experienced riders every few years and any time I get a new bike. But your comment that the seat is wide is a red flag to me that your legs are just too short for this bike - the R3's seat is actually very narrow. Seat width is mostly dictated by engine width, and as a small displacement side-by-side twin, only a small V-twin or single would be narrower. The seat is also very flat (I was able to have an upholsterer cut an inch out of the height of the seat on my YZF600R, but you don't have that to work with on the R3).

So, see how you do with the BRC's bikes and make your decisions from there, either to stick with the R3, trade it for a shorter bike (cruiser configurations take a lot of muscle to steer and don't lean far, but often sit very low to the ground), or just stay as a pillion.

One other thing about being a pillion: the MSF's experienced rider course is open to rider/passenger pairs, so you can learn to be a better pillion and your DH can hone his passenger-carrying skills at the same time. Those usually fill up quickly, so you may not be able to get into an ERC this season, but it's something to think about when spots become available.

Whatever you do - be safe and have fun!
 

·
Registered
2015 Yamaha R3. Purchased 8-20-2021.
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
At 5'3" myself, unless your legs are very short for your height, you really ought to be able to at least get the balls of both feet down, or flatfoot solidly on one with the other on tiptoe. I can almost flatfoot the R3 with both feet, and my legs are on the short side.

But I have to say if you can't get either foot down, it's not a bike to start on, and even as an experienced rider you'd want to ride it only at the track. Real world riding means stop signs on a steep slope (sometimes on wet pavement), lights turning red with no place to put your foot but in a hole, parking on very uneven surfaces with transition from pavement to stone, starting on wet grass, paddling on deep gravel, and many other situations where you need solid contact between foot and ground. At the track, you've got smooth pavement, a flat surface at your pit, and your pit crew to catch you there if you haven't mastered a moving mount/dismount (which is something you never ever ever want to do on the street). So don't let track riders tell you there's no bike too tall for you on the street. I spent probably half of my 200,000 miles (so far) on 600cc inline fours that were too tall for me, and I'm really, really over that whole experience.

If there is something you're doing wrong, the MSF instructors will spot it. I'm so glad you're taking the class. I recommend it to everyone, plus a refresher for experienced riders every few years and any time I get a new bike. But your comment that the seat is wide is a red flag to me that your legs are just too short for this bike - the R3's seat is actually very narrow. Seat width is mostly dictated by engine width, and as a small displacement side-by-side twin, only a small V-twin or single would be narrower. The seat is also very flat (I was able to have an upholsterer cut an inch out of the height of the seat on my YZF600R, but you don't have that to work with on the R3).

So, see how you do with the BRC's bikes and make your decisions from there, either to stick with the R3, trade it for a shorter bike (cruiser configurations take a lot of muscle to steer and don't lean far, but often sit very low to the ground), or just stay as a pillion.

One other thing about being a pillion: the MSF's experienced rider course is open to rider/passenger pairs, so you can learn to be a better pillion and your DH can hone his passenger-carrying skills at the same time. Those usually fill up quickly, so you may not be able to get into an ERC this season, but it's something to think about when spots become available.

Whatever you do - be safe and have fun!
Hi. I can be on the balls of my feet but the problem is I have no strength on the balls of my feet so I can’t hold the bike up if it starts to tip.

I had plantar fasciitis surgery two years ago on my right foot so I actually am physically unable to be on the balls of that foot for more than maybe 15 minutes before I have excruciating pain. Also on my right foot I tore a tendon in my ankle nine years ago missing a step in my house and my ankle doesn’t actually allow me to point my toe very much which exasperates the pain. Maybe once I am able to get my feet on the pegs I can use the rear brake and stop on my left foot only. That would alleviate the issue of not being able to be on the ball of my right foot. Or if the crest of the road requires me to have my right foot down it’s flat with my left foot up

The biggest issue is that I don’t have any strength with my legs so wide because of the seat (it feels wide to me after 15 minutes and my hips agree) AND being on the balls of my feet. Seriously who can hold 365 pounds on the balls of their feet? I strength train and I can’t do that I guess I have to be a bodybuilder to ride this motorcycle. Lol

However it’s most likely possible it’s because I’m using the front brake. As you stated, class instructors should be able to catch that. I have no idea what to expect from the class except that they have successfully taught people who have never touched a motorcycle even as a passenger how to ride and pass the road test, so I still have a chance lol

At the end of the day if this doesn’t work out for me I’m really not going to be too upset. Yes I’ll be disappointed but I’ll still be a better pillion rider understanding the principles -Plus I will also look into those two up classes you mentioned for next year
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
Ok. Now i know you have foot issues and weak legs, ill definately suggest you go the passenger route. I had my r3 start to go over at low speeds a few times. Each time it took all my strength to save it. Im 5'9" 185lbs with crazy strong legs.
 

·
Registered
2015 Yamaha R3. Purchased 8-20-2021.
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ok. Now i know you have foot issues and weak legs, ill definately suggest you go the passenger route. I had my r3 start to go over at low speeds a few times. Each time it took all my strength to save it. Im 5'9" 185lbs with crazy strong legs.
But Can anyone squat 365lbs? I’m going to go with no so I don’t get it. How do people ride 650lb bikes? 1000lbs? People with false legs ride….so I’m not sure if it’s leg strength or me doing something wrong. I’ll learn on Tuesday for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
The trick is to keep the bike as upright as possible while stopped so it doesnt start to go over. Because once it goes past the tipping point it takes super human strength to save the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
Just a silly question from me. But isn't your husband able to give you some advice on your technique?

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2015 Yamaha R3. Purchased 8-20-2021.
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just a silly question from me. But isn't your husband able to give you some advice on your technique?

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
No actually, lol he was taking me out for lessons and it just led to big fights. He learned to ride 15 years ago and he was telling me that I should get my feet up on the very first try and give it throttle. Where the school tells you to waddle the bike on your first day to my first day I actually dropped like four times because I didn’t know what to do and he wasn’t giving me any instructions that I understood
 

·
Registered
2015
Joined
·
22 Posts
I have had my bike a few months and only have had a few lessons. I am great with the clutch and front braking. I have only gotten my feet on the pegs once because I have no clue what I’m doing so using the rear brake isn’t possible yet. I can hover my feet and ride the clutch only.
But I cannot hold the weight of the bike at all on one foot. I’ve dropped it 9 times and it’s really frustrating. So I’m afraid to give it throttle because when I am already stopped it falls over.
How on earth does anyone hold 365 lbs on one leg?!

It seems if I control the angle stopped it’s fine -but when it shifts balance unexpectedly I CANT hold it up

I have the brc next week and hope they can teach me.
The R3 might not be the right fit for you to learn on. I always advice new riders to get a used bike that they can comfortably flat foot on to learn. It will help build your technique & confidence much easier than jumping onto sportbike.
I learned how to ride in the 80's on a neighbor's moped when i was 13 i think. I eventually got one for myself & practiced daily in empty parking lots with a more experienced friend. After a year, i had the basic skills & confidence to learn on big bikes. It takes time to build yourself into a confident rider, don't rush it. Safety first before all else.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top