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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
The R3 might not be the right fit for you to learn on. I always advice new riders to get a used bike that they can comfortably flat foot on to learn. It will help build your technique & confidence much easier than jumping onto sportbike.
I learned how to ride in the 80's on a neighbor's moped when i was 13 i think. I eventually got one for myself & practiced daily in empty parking lots with a more experienced friend. After a year, i had the basic skills & confidence to learn on big bikes. It takes time to build yourself into a confident rider, don't rush it. Safety first before all else.
I wish that were possible. I can’t fit another bike in my townhouse garage with two Yamahas and my car. I would have to sell the r3 to get something else- and I have not found one that runs for less than $3500 in Jersey, I’d sooner say forget it all. Supposed to be a good learner bike.
 

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It sounds like you really need to learn on a smaller/shorter bike. That will most likely build your confidence, and you should be able to eventually graduate to the R3. Take your time, and enjoy the process. Bike "drops" happen..... I've been riding for over 40 years, and have still managed to "drop" both my track bikes (in the pits). My best advice, is do the MSF class, and use the bikes they provide. You got this!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
It sounds like you really need to learn on a smaller/shorter bike. That will most likely build your confidence, and you should be able to eventually graduate to the R3. Take your time, and enjoy the process. Bike "drops" happen..... I've been riding for over 40 years, and have still managed to "drop" both my track bikes (in the pits). My best advice, is do the MSF class, and use the bikes they provide. You got this!!!
I tried the MSF two days ago. They excused me day one because I couldn’t do the cone weaving and then dropped the bike on the 2nd gear perimeter drill. After three hours on the only bike that fit me (Honda Rebel), I was exhausted mentally and physically. Yesterday I was so sore I was in Tears.

The MSF was horrible. It’s impossible for ME to learn in a minute and they expected us to be shown once and then do the drill. I know many never touched a bike and get on and do it but that’s not how I learn. I take longer since I don’t have the muscle memory instantly. Some can be shown something and do it. I can’t dance either for the same reason. Learning to drive stick took me time too. Most of what they wanted us to do I’ve never done on a bicycle either so brain to body doesn’t exist. The throttle is also confusing to me. How does one steer and not affect the throttle? Bicycles don’t have throttles.
 

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I admit that I rode my Ninja 250 around my 25 mph neighborhood streets (but not beyond onto any main streets) for a solid 3 months before I took MSF and got my license. I feel like it took a couple years for my muscle memory to always just be there by instinct, but I started in my late 30s.

Sounds like you may need some one-on-one sessions with other rider(s) that can help get you going back and forth in an empty parking lot somewhere. Just get going, then stop, then push the bike around 180, and repeat. All in 1st gear, mostly just clutch work and no throttle or just baby throttle. Back and forth. Get that start and stop down first. But yeah if the bike is too tall, it's going to take a certain about of just-send-it mentality and self confidence and risk.

About the steering vs throttle, you shouldn't have a death grip on the bars. Support your body with your core and legs. Think of holding the bars with just your fingertips, I mean, not actually, but you should have a light touch on the bars, not leaning on them or gripping hard.

Story time -> I had a death grip and leaned on the bars the first year. Only then did I learn that that's not the correct way. It was almost like learning to ride all over again.

Any used Rebel 300s near by? They have low seats iirc. Would be much more trivial to learn. Then for the R3, all you have to do is master the mount/dismount, as you already would know riding and throttle and brake and clutch etc etc etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I admit that I rode my Ninja 250 around my 25 mph neighborhood streets (but not beyond onto any main streets) for a solid 3 months before I took MSF and got my license. I feel like it took a couple years for my muscle memory to always just be there by instinct, but I started in my late 30s.

Sounds like you may need some one-on-one sessions with other rider(s) that can help get you going back and forth in an empty parking lot somewhere. Just get going, then stop, then push the bike around 180, and repeat. All in 1st gear, mostly just clutch work and no throttle or just baby throttle. Back and forth. Get that start and stop down first. But yeah if the bike is too tall, it's going to take a certain about of just-send-it mentality and self confidence and risk.

About the steering vs throttle, you shouldn't have a death grip on the bars. Support your body with your core and legs. Think of holding the bars with just your fingertips, I mean, not actually, but you should have a light touch on the bars, not leaning on them or gripping hard.

Story time -> I had a death grip and leaned on the bars the first year. Only then did I learn that that's not the correct way. It was almost like learning to ride all over again.

Any used Rebel 300s near by? They have low seats iirc. Would be much more trivial to learn. Then for the R3, all you have to do is master the mount/dismount, as you already would know riding and throttle and brake and clutch etc etc etc.
The only rebels I saw, or any bike for that matter, for sale that’s less than $3k is not running. I have no place to put it anyway.

I did order a lowering kit for my bike and will adjust the forks as well, to be safely flat footed. That should do the trick. Thanks for the explanation on the bars. I will practice that.

My plan while I wait for the kit to come is to start my bike in the (open) garage, set her straight on a rack and ride the throttle in neutral. Get used to HOLDING rpm’s and then turn the bars and not rev or come off the throttle. At least I’ll get used to being gentle and how to hear and feel the engine.
 

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Negative. Back in my day we didnt do things like practice in parking lots and/ or put her on the rack. We cut our teeth on the mean Socal freeways, became Legends, then went pro.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Negative. Back in my day we didnt do things like practice in parking lots and/ or put her on the rack. We cut our teeth on the mean Socal freeways, became Legends, then went pro.
Yeah well that isn’t possible
 

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Says my abilities
I replied earlier.... You seem like you really want to learn this. Some people learn differently than others. Based on what I've read in this whole thread, the R3 may be a bit aggressive for you personally. It's not a good "starter bike" for everyone..... It sounds like maybe you have some difficulties with your feet? If that is the case, and you have no previous riding experience, the R3 probably isn't the best choice (sorry)..... Have you considered a Honda "GROM"? I had one and I absolutely LOVED it!!!! You can buy one new for about $3299 MSRP- It's cross between a scooter, and a motorcycle. They're the size of a scooter, smaller wheels, light weight, short(er), but they have the same manual transmission/clutch as a motorcycle. It might be worth a look, and I know it would be MUCH easier to learn the clutch, and balance required to eventually ride an R3 successfully-

I am a rider coach at a local trackday/riding school.... I do better with coaching riders with more experience, but I want to learn to coach newer riders more. That being said, please do NOT listen to Maxpressure520 on his advise the just take it to the SoCal freeways 🙄. Please feel free to message me if you have any direct questions. I enjoy helping anyone that wants to learn-
 

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Heads up on the new '22 Grom (I had one for 9 weeks) ... there are an awful lot of noisy squeal reports coming in from people on the Grom forum, one dealer claimed it's the main transmission shaft bearing failing. Grom is not super low either, my 4'11" friend, she could barely get her toes on the ground, it made me nervous. It's certainly a lot lighter though.
 

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MSF is definitely a great way to learn the basics so that you can learn how to ride your bike. I am a year into riding with over 25K miles. I fkn love to ride! Took the MSF course before I got on my own bike and rode. Haven't gotten off my bike since! And I own a BMW 325i so.......
 

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Oh **** no don't ride the so cal freeways yet girl omfg no. The pavement is so uneven in so many places in just one lane of the freeway let alone all the lanes. Our bikes are barely heavy enough to blow by semi trucks unless you're going pretty fast. Save the freeway for a few months down the road. Save yourself by doing so, too!
 

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But Can anyone squat 365lbs? I’m going to go with no so I don’t get it. How do people ride 650lb bikes? 1000lbs? People with false legs ride….so I’m not sure if it’s leg strength or me doing something wrong. I’ll learn on Tuesday for sure.
Some of it factors on leaverage. I can pick my bike up. I just pushed it a mile, too!
 
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