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get a proper shock. You don't need radical geometry changes to "go racing". A proper shock has ride height of anywhere from +/-5mm or +0-10mm. Even the YSS shocks probably have this feature for the R3 application. If the R3 is slow to turn-in, you're doing something wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Disclaimer: I have no opinion on this one way or the other. I saw this kit and remembered reading member's posts who said they wished the rear were higher for racing. Some of that can be done with minor pre-load adjustments. As stated above, a different shock can also achieve the desired result, though at considerable expense. A riser kit MAY do the same with very little cash outlay.

The R3 has a slightly greater Rake at 25 degrees, as compared to the 24 degrees of the R6 and R1, so raising the rear (decreasing the Rake) can make the R3 handle more closely to those two more performance-oriented motorcycles.

"Observations of steering geometry show that raising the rear of the motorcycle by as little as 10 millimeters will decrease the wheelbase and the rake, allowing the motorcycle to turn faster with less effort required from the rider. Sport bikes will gain considerable maneuverability boosts by raising the rear of the motorcycle slightly. This will allow the rider to tailor his motorcycle's steering habits to the needs of the racetrack on which s/he is riding.
Raising the rear too much can alter Rake too drastically and negatively affect steering, with an increase in the possibility of causing low side crashes. If increasing rear ride height, always make changes in very small increments and observe the changes to steering feel after each change."
 

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Read a couple posts in the past about raising the rear of the bike for racing. I'm guessing that would be for better peg clearance and quicker turn-in?
Discuss.....

Here is the first riser kit out there.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DIMOTIV-Ris...016-/141745363790?hash=item2100ae9b4e&vxp=mtr

View attachment 13073
I dunno Fang, if that lower bolt isn't super tight, looks like the whole deal could just rotate backward, putting your shock into the tire. Plus they can't spell "raising".....
 

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I'm also concerned about a "U" bracket and a bolt costing $104.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I dunno Fang, if that lower bolt isn't super tight, looks like the whole deal could just rotate backward, putting your shock into the tire. Plus they can't spell "raising".....
Good point...

They also don't say what the range of lift is. Looks like you can alter that by what angle you position the lift bracket at...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I'm also concerned about a "U" bracket and a bolt costing $104.
Does seem a bit over the top, price-wise. Seems like $15-$20 shipped would be more like it. Trying to take advantage of being the first to offer something like this for the R3, maybe? Hoping some racers trying to get racing this Summer before the season is too far along will spring for it in spite of the cost?

They also don't say what the range of lift is. Looks like you can alter that by what angle you position the lift bracket at...
 

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you have to be *insane* to do this with thin aluminum let alone expecting a bracket to hold still and not pivot about the original bolt when force is applied (either direction). I can't tell if it's braced against something to prevent it from rotating.

A full-zoot YSS shock is ~400USD or 10K BHAT give or take.
MX366-275TRCL which has threaded preload, rebound, remote compression and length (aka ride-height) adjustment.
http://www.r3-forums.com/forum/562-suspension/19049-yss-rear-shocks-thailand.html
 

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Read a couple posts in the past about raising the rear of the bike for racing. I'm guessing that would be for better peg clearance and quicker turn-in?
Discuss.....

Here is the first riser kit out there.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DIMOTIV-Ris...016-/141745363790?hash=item2100ae9b4e&vxp=mtr

View attachment 13073
I dont think that rising the shock will do the job. The rigidity of the front fork will be affected if you do that. the problem with R3 is the angle of its frame at the rear. It is set to make the seat height lowered by 2-3 inches. If only the frame of the R3 is set to have a higher or adjustable seat height, no need to do anything. So you might consider rising the saddle rather than the shock. By a racing saddle/seat for for R3
68737


Look at the R6, the frame of its seat is a little bit inclined.
68738
 

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Disclaimer: I have no opinion on this one way or the other. I saw this kit and remembered reading member's posts who said they wished the rear were higher for racing. Some of that can be done with minor pre-load adjustments. As stated above, a different shock can also achieve the desired result, though at considerable expense. A riser kit MAY do the same with very little cash outlay.

The R3 has a slightly greater Rake at 25 degrees, as compared to the 24 degrees of the R6 and R1, so raising the rear (decreasing the Rake) can make the R3 handle more closely to those two more performance-oriented motorcycles.

"Observations of steering geometry show that raising the rear of the motorcycle by as little as 10 millimeters will decrease the wheelbase and the rake, allowing the motorcycle to turn faster with less effort required from the rider. Sport bikes will gain considerable maneuverability boosts by raising the rear of the motorcycle slightly. This will allow the rider to tailor his motorcycle's steering habits to the needs of the racetrack on which s/he is riding.
Raising the rear too much can alter Rake too drastically and negatively affect steering, with an increase in the possibility of causing low side crashes. If increasing rear ride height, always make changes in very small increments and observe the changes to steering feel after each change."
exactlly!, the main problem why the R3 has a lowered seat height is the frame. If only the frame at the seat is a little bit rising then we do not need to do anything. Can we rise the seat by bending the rear frame where the seat is located?
 

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On the racetrack, the issue isn't the seat height or shape. It's cornering clearance, and to some degree, anti-squat geometry (affected by the height of the swing-arm pivot - which is too low, with the stock suspension set-up).
 
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