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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

Since this R3 seems like its never going to get on the east coast for a while and ive been waiting for 2 months now since my deposit im thinking about changing my mind and getting a used bike on craigslist with a bigger engine and even cheaper than the NEW R3. keep in mind this will be my first bike ever so ill post here the links to the 4 bikes im looking at and can someone with experience give me their take on the 4 bikes (year,mileage, etc) and what I should do since its my first bike and i really need this bike ASAP since its my commuter bike to work and around the city (philadelphia)
Thanks guys!

1# http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/4961805740.html

2# http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/4948636180.html

3# http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/4977072117.html

4# http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/4974622541.html
 

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Hey guys,

Since this R3 seems like its never going to get on the east coast for a while and ive been waiting for 2 months now since my deposit im thinking about changing my mind and getting a used bike on craigslist with a bigger engine and even cheaper than the NEW R3. keep in mind this will be my first bike ever so ill post here the links to the 4 bikes im looking at and can someone with experience give me their take on the 4 bikes (year,mileage, etc) and what I should do since its my first bike and i really need this bike ASAP since its my commuter bike to work and around the city (philadelphia)
Thanks guys!

1# http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/4961805740.html

2# http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/4948636180.html

3# http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/4977072117.html

4# http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/mcy/4974622541.html
All of these bikes are really bad for you becasue this will be your first bike. All of those bikes are super sports. FZ07 675 R6 ect. All of these bike can get you into trouble real quick my friend. So please dont take this the wrong way but consider this. 1 This is your first bike you have no real experiance so consider your insurance costs which will be expensive. 2. All of those bikes can pick up some serious speed real quick and are not the least forgiving if you hook a turn too fast or have to stop hard. 3. Have you even been to a motorcycle saftey course? Or experianced rider course? So how exactly do you know if riding a motorcycle is really for you? 4.Ask your self why exactly do you want a bike in the first place? 5. Have you ever read A twist of the wrist by Keth Code or Sport bike riding techniques? Just relax the bike will be at your local dealer soon and trust me the wait will be worth it. I waited for my bike since January and picked her up last week the wait was worth it. You will be a better rider in the long run if you start on the R3 look at the machines I own. I now have a R3 and I was like wow this bike is so much fun I have been missing out all this time. I can take a 250 and dump on guys who ride 600s and 1000s all day in the turns because of the stable and user frienfly platform. Do not let anyone tell you that a 250 or R3 is for a girl because believe me it sure as **** isnt the case real skill comes from a solid foundation and the R3 is the perfect building block for you!
 

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None of those bikes are even remotely suitable for a first bike,
and nor is a Brand new R3 that you will drop and cry over.


Secondhand cbr250 or Ninja 250/300 will do a far better job.
Even better the cheapest First Gen Ninja 250 you can find,
learn to ride it, drop it, make all the mistakes... THEN get the dream R3 or 600 in a year.
 

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If I we're you in your current mindset I would go out and test ride a RC390 and those above. But if you still don't want too then do yourself a favor and get a ninja 650, cbr650f, fz-07, and sfv650. These are all good bikes with plenty of punch that you will grow into without them being too much to start with. A 2014/2013 ninja 300 is an excellent, cheap bike if you are in a rush. But if YOU MUST get something bigger, go with one of the ones above...I have heard PA has quite a bit of RC390 available but no one is buying... Anyway, it's your money and your life so do what you won't regret.
 

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The R3 is my first bike.. So I know what you mean.. The wait sucks so bad it hurts. I finally got my bike 2 days ago... and love it.. Eventually I might get a bigger bike. but for starters this is great. actually I might not want to get a bigger bike. this thing can move. Plenty of power, Looks awesome etc. The dealership I went through lowered the price of the Ninja 300s by over 1000... making it way cheaper.. but I still stayed with the R3 knowing I could have gotten the ninja weeks before this bike. You can get into some scary situations on this bike.. It has enough power to throw you. it can and will.
I say don't go for such a big bike right off the start. My younger sis wants a Honda 600 as her first bike. Everyone she talks to tells her not too. Start small. Work your way up.
Bigger more power... take a small cc bike for a test ride. You will be surprised.
Motorcycling is fun.. but why add so much more risk right from the start. Power does nothing for you when you wreck the bike and it cant be driven or you have a broken leg or something.


Even if you go to a different small cc bike. No one here will blame you. Safety is always number 1.


Just my 2 cents.
Start Small.
 
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The R3 is my first bike.. So I know what you mean.. The wait sucks so bad it hurts. I finally got my bike 2 days ago... and love it.. Eventually I might get a bigger bike. but for starters this is great. actually I might not want to get a bigger bike. this thing can move. Plenty of power, Looks awesome etc. The dealership I went through lowered the price of the Ninja 300s by over 1000... making it way cheaper.. but I still stayed with the R3 knowing I could have gotten the ninja weeks before this bike. You can get into some scary situations on this bike.. It has enough power to throw you. it can and will.
I say don't go for such a big bike right off the start. My younger sis wants a Honda 600 as her first bike. Everyone she talks to tells her not too. Start small. Work your way up.
Bigger more power... take a small cc bike for a test ride. You will be surprised.
Motorcycling is fun.. but why add so much more risk right from the start. Power does nothing for you when you wreck the bike and it cant be driven or you have a broken leg or something.


Even if you go to a different small cc bike. No one here will blame you. Safety is always number 1.


Just my 2 cents.
Start Small.
Didnt I tell you the wait would be worth it good job my friend
!:)
 

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At just a few LBS more than 400, fully loaded,
A second hand GS500F could give you a very similar experience.
With a top speed of just over 110mph, and a second hand sticker tag of $2k, similar sporty design, they're quite a good investment!
Gas mileage should be about the same, and
Resale value is almost identical to your purchase value; so you'll just lose registration costs of the bike (unless your insurance charges more for these bikes, or you somehow lay it down).

No chance of doing wheelies on a GS, without changing sprockets, and it's fuel valve's PRI setting will make your bike start almost immediately, even with a low battery (as long as the starter can rotate the engine).

Switching later to an R3 should be funner,
higher RPM, better fuel economy, similar acceleration and top speed, but faster cornering and lower weight.
50lbs lower weight, and that's a lot!

If you're scared of higher powered bikes, don't. The 500 is just as mild as a cbr250.

The GS feels like a heavy dog compared to a ninja or cbr. But it has 200cc more to push the weight around.
Low power at low RPM, so you won't accidentally skid the wheels.
Powerband starts at 6 and 8k rpm, similar to the R3.

It's your first bike. Never get a new bike as your first bike.
your first bike should be one which you may crash, without breaking your bank as well. 500cc or below, preferably $3k or below.
resell it 6 months from now, and buy a better (new) bike!
The experience should teach you some things, and make you more aware of issues to look out for in a new bike, like seating comfort, wrist comfort, foot peg positions, etc....)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If I we're you in your current mindset I would go out and test ride a RC390 and those above. But if you still don't want too then do yourself a favor and get a ninja 650, cbr650f, fz-07, and sfv650. These are all good bikes with plenty of punch that you will grow into without them being too much to start with. A 2014/2013 ninja 300 is an excellent, cheap bike if you are in a rush. But if YOU MUST get something bigger, go with one of the ones above...I have heard PA has quite a bit of RC390 available but no one is buying... Anyway, it's your money and your life so do what you won't regret.
I called KTM here in PA and they said no one has received the RC390 YET? when is it coming out do you know ?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I appreciate the feedback. I ran into this other bike as well, they say its a great bike to start with and that you can grow with as well. The SVF 650 Suzuki.What do you think ?
 

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You should consider a used dual-sport like a DRZ400 or a WR250 for a first bike. Smokin deals on craigslist from private owners if you show up with a roll of hundreds in your hand. They are great on the street, great for commuting with the super plush suspension, lightweight, take a beating on or off-road, have great re-sale value, easy to learn the basics on, and best of all, you look cool riding them. Just take someone with you who knows a little about bikes when you buy.


Learning to ride on a big heavy 650 would be a drag. You'll probably resell your bike in a year or two anyways until you find one your really excited about and have some experience learning what you like. Talk to most people who have ridden for a while, I'll bet they have gone through 10-15 bikes or more. Ride them all, but don't jump into something big, boring or EXPENSIVE at first.
 

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The following are all IMHO and are based on 50 years of riding and owning 34 different bikes, from 50cc up to 1,700cc:

Stick with something in the 250-400cc range. The SV650 is NOT a beginner bike. Lots of beginners buy bikes that are way too big, too heavy and too powerful for them, then they get scared or crash, and never ride a motorcycle again. So the motorcycling community loses a few more riders that way.

It's not a problem starting with a new bike. I, and almost everyone I know, started with a new, small, bike and none of us have ever crashed (in 35-55 years of motorcycling) because we weren't doing stupid things on the bikes.

Take the MSF course this Summer.

The DRZ400 and WR250 have VERY tall saddle heights (35" and 36.6") and too much power for a beginner. Unless you have a really long inseam you'd be on tiptoes on these two bikes and that's not a good thing for a beginner. You need something that you can put your feet flat on the ground with, for stability as you learn.

Start small and work your way up in displacement and physical size if you really need to. The R3 should do well for you for many years.

I've test ridden all of these recently: Honda CBR300R is way under-powered and vibrates a lot, as does the KTM Duke 390 (plus the build quality is horrible). KTM RC390 is way overpriced and vibrates, plus it has rough idle, overheating and stalling problems, AND is VERY cramped so not good for more than short rides. Ninja 300 would work well for you but the R3 appears to be a better bike all around. If it fits your budget, buy it!

2009 Suzuki Dr200SE
2013 Honda CB500X
2013 Yamaha V-Star 1300 Deluxe Bagger
2015 Yamaha YZF-R3
 

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Sorry, you said SVF650. There is no SVF650. There IS a SFV650. That's the Gladius. Also not a beginner bike....

If you can afford either of those you can afford the R3, a much more modern bike and engine.
 

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I'd like to offer a counter point.

People liberally throw out the advice of start with a 250-300cc as a blanket statement. Its like outlawing beer bottles in stadiums. Just because one or two guys throw them around, every other sane person has to suffer with beer in cheap plastic cups.

Now, obviously, its not just one or two guys who won't be able to handle a 600cc. Maybe half. Maybe 2/3 of people.

It all comes down to competence. Risk taking. Inherent skill level. Some people are naturals. And then some people should have no business owning a motorcycle at any point in their entire life. This is a truth not many people like to say, instead they start out with "start out on a 250!". While this statement will work for many people, there are some people out there who will outgrow a 250-300cc in a matter of days. Literally days.

The issue, the real issue is... how do you know if you are one of these people? I suppose thats why time and time again people are given the advice to start out on a 300cc. It makes sense. Better to be safe than sorry.

I started out a fresh beginner on a FZ07. Its been 6 months and I'm already wanting to try out a 1000cc motorcycle. Just to try it out, which I will tomorrow. But I know it is not necessary for my needs. I took my wife's R3 on a 40 mile freeway trip + 6 mile country roads to ride it home. My god, I could not imagine starting out on that bike. It doesn't have the power I need. I cannot stand having to rev it to 7k to get any decent pull. While the FZ07 will blast off at 2k. I can hit 60mph on 3rd gear! But the R3 perfect for her. She had difficulty during her MSF course, she still passed but it was quite clear her skill level, she needs to start and stick with a 300cc for a bit. Maybe forever. No clue. Time will tell. Me on the other hand, I never had one problem with the FZ07 from the start. IMO it is a tame bike. Despite the fact that you can easily wheelie it, I've never once accidentally wheelied it. The throttle is jerky, but its fine under my command and touch. Clutch control always at very low speeds. I have a level head. I am not a risk taker. I am very competent. I somehow knew starting on a 300cc was not the right thing for me to do. It helps I come from a huge family of motorcycle owners and I did ride a dirt bike once or twice as a young teenager. But that was literally one-two hours of riding, decades ago. I took the MSF course and had a blast and could tell those 250cc machines were underpowered. All of this and truly knowing myself, I knew I probably had a decent shot at starting on a 600-700cc machine. Truth be told, the FZ07 is a tame, lightweight bike. Honestly. That helps. I'm guessing the sv650 (non-gladius) would be a great starter bike as well.

My best bud, highly competent guy. Skill-full. You can trust your life in his hands and to watch your back. He was a secret service agent during bush administration, transferred over to DEA, and now a private investigator for a law firm... his very first motorcycle was a BMW 1000gs. Its a sport tourer, but still a liter bike. It has now been 7 years, and he has about 30k miles on it. Once again, he knew himself well. I know him well. His character, his skills, everything, you look at him on how reliable, competent he is. Thats a guy you don't need to tell him to start on a 300cc.

Its a case by case basis. It is safe to say to everyone to start out on a low cc bike, but it is not for everyone.
 

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I agree with that counter point. Some people can handle a larger bike but it is not popular advice to tell someone to start out on a larger bike than a 250-300cc bike. Especially on the internet where you don't know a persons maturity level.
My first street bike was a 360cc 2-stroke dual sport, a 1974 Yamaha DT360 (fairly powerful bike). Before that, I only had some experience with an 80cc dirtbike, that was all.
It created a love for riding I have to this day. Many fond memories of that old DT360. This is the reason I suggested the dual-sport as a beginner bike, just my personnel experience.
I think most riders eventually go full circle if they ride long enough. They will own big, small and mid at some point in their lives.
 

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The USA doesn't have tiered licensing system, or decent rider training requirements which is reflected by their alarming road toll.
Even on this forum USA riders are calling for rider aids like ABS, instead of gaining basic life saving skills.


Ive been riding & racing for 40 years and racing tarmac for 3 years against some very fast riders..
But I don't kid myself Ive 'outgrown' or 'get bored' with a 250.
100mph will still get anyone into hot water let alone someone with only a few yrs experience.


Ive seen very few freak riders that that 'master' bikes straight away,
they are racing at National and International level.
 

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No disrespect meant. Don't know your skill level. All my riding friends laughed at my choice of motorcycle, and all my non riding friends said "you're getting a motorcycle, are you crazy" can't win, but bigger is not always better.
 

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I agree.

I currently have small, medium AND large motorcycles. Different bikes for different uses. The last sport bike I owned was a '96 Ducati 916 Senna Edition. Sold it 8 years ago. I loved it, but the temptation was always there to push it to its limits, which were far, far beyond my own riding skills. The 916 was a real handful, though very satisfying when I managed to get it right.

I have discovered over the last 50+ years of riding (started off-road on an 80cc Suzuki 2-stroke when I was 12, have had 1 or more bikes ever since) that, at least for me, it is much more fun to ride a small displacement bike. They're more flickable and take much less effort to steer them when it really gets twisty.

My smaller bikes were always sold with far more miles on them than my larger ones.

Riding the R3 in the Colorado Mountains is the most fun I've had in years.
 

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My cbr250 spent its entire life popping on the 10,800 revlimiter,
Its humble 23hp IS what made it the best fun bike Ive had,
indicated 171kph down hills and 152 up them and handled like a scalpel on its budget suspension with good tyres.


The Ninja 250 racebike was faster but didn't have the same fun factor as it felt like it weighed a ton in comparison (which is only 10kg but felt more as Ninjas are primitive dynamics)


I imagine the R3 to be more fun than cocaine sprinkled pizzas delivered by smiling Japanese hookers in schoolgirl outfits,
time will tell when I get mine.
 

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I've been riding for 20 years on two wheels, with nothing bigger than a 250cc, but the first time that I bought myself a big bike, a Shadow VT 750, with neck breaking low end torque, I felt the bike was way out of my league.
there was no way you could ride that bike safely, as a beginner.

when you're not careful in first gear, even on a dry road, you can spin the rear wheel in 1st gear, have the bike ride you instead of the other way around, and it wouldn't be the first person to panic because the bike over performing what I'm used to.

Not only that, but the sheer weight of the 660lbs rhino, didn't feel like quite reassuring, when going into a turn, or trying to avoid a colision.

The front wheel of any bike, is made to brake no more than 500lbs (that would be 400lbs + ~180lbs rider). Even 500lbs on the front wheel does not guarantee a safe and quick stop.

So not only dangers from acceleration, but also weight to avoid collision, and braking distance all favor smaller bikes.

I don't believe that some people are any different than others.
you could be a 40yr old veteran on 2 wheels, and still can't get your goldwing out of a pinch, where a bike like the R3 might have saved you with minimal experience.

If I where to create a "perfect" bike, it would be basically a naked R3.
the R3 without fairings, with 360deg ptwin engine (quieter exhaust tone), handlebars for comfort riding upright, taller suspension, and geared 3000 rpm at 40mph.

Acceleration and engine braking should be less intense, mpg about 75-80mpg, and a more comfy seat for rider and passenger, and mounts for luggage cases (side and rear)

That would be my perfect bike, but the R3 comes very close to the perfect bike for beginner and intermediate rider.
I might need nothing else than this, for a long time!

Only adventurers might want a more comfy bike (better suspension, softer seat, better seating ergonomics, etc...).
But 300+ cc don't really need to be upgraded, unless you plan on track racing, or doing long trips of over 4 hours at speeds higher than 90mph.
 
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