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Discussion Starter #1
Figured I'd start a thread so other people can report back what they find using a 120 front and 150 or 160 rear.

I can confirm a 160/60 will fit no problem, which opens up a lot more options for super sticky race rubber and longer lasting sport touring rubber. I won't road test until I get a new set, so hopefully the handling will still be OK.


 

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That tire looks like the bead is being pulled in too much. The profile of the tire isn't round. Am I looking at it wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That tire looks like the bead is being pulled in too much. The profile of the tire isn't round. Am I looking at it wrong?
Yeah that's how it looked on another bike originally meant to take a 160. The tire's just old and shitty, doesn't look very round off the wheel either.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Also, a couple things I noticed when swapping tires - Michelin is finally balancing their tires (thank god!) and marking them, but there were no weights on the wheel. It only needed one weight, but I found it a little funny that they didn't bother balancing.

Typical of all new bikes I've worked on, there was very little lube where there should be. I greased the axle and put a dab of anti-seize on the threads.

The chain was at the tightest end of spec. That's fine for a big bike, but with 35 hp we probably won't see very much stretch. I put it in the middle of spec and I'll take another measurement in another hundred miles or so.

The rear sprocket has a guard on it. I guess it's on there in case the chain breaks but I don't really see any point to it. Anyone have a good reason why I shouldn't ditch it?
 

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Try the Dunlop and Pirelli tires made for the ninja 250/300 and supermoto wheels. Sizes for the rear are 150 and there are plenty of fast guys running those.
 

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The rear sprocket has a guard on it. I guess it's on there in case the chain breaks but I don't really see any point to it. Anyone have a good reason why I shouldn't ditch it?

For inspection? Pennsylvania requires a chain guard, found out after removing mine from my dual-sport.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
For inspection? Pennsylvania requires a chain guard, found out after removing mine from my dual-sport.
A plastic chain guard on the swingarm though, right? That makes total sense to me and I wouldn't take it off a street bike. I'm talking about a circular metal guard on the sprocket itself that makes zero sense to me. I've never seen another sportbike with one. Fortunately we don't have inspection in WA, so I guess I'm getting rid of it.
 

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Mine will come off 1st time I pull the rear wheel. If you inspect and maintain your chain properly and regularly, you'll never use this "safety feature". Less un-sprung weight!!! ;-)
 

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I ordered a set of Metzeler M7 RR. Stayed with the 110 for front and went with 150 for rear. I mostly ride around town so probably won't have much input to add. I only decided to change when I rode out around Mt Rainier and never got comfortable with the stock tires. For some reason I think it will make me feel safer with new tires. They also have a promotion for a free Ogio helmet bag with the purchase so I guess it's a double win for me. We'll see...
 

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Just mounted the tires I mentioned above. I was surprised how much difference it made. Handles so much smoother and maybe even faster into turns than the OEM tires. I can turn into a street round about so much easier. I'm glad I made the change. Another perk is that the side walls are not as tall and makes it looks much better. I think it's the best $210 I spent on the bike. pics can be found here: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B9cOwgo1DrrXSWpKMnNTcjJWUU0&usp=sharing
 

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Looks good what aspect did you get on the 150?
 

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Ok, wasn't sure if you used 65 or 60 on the 150, does the speedo seem to be ok yet?
 

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No one seems to make a 150/65-17 at the moment.

The speedometer will read 1-2 mph low at highway speeds (40-80 mph) with the 150/60-17 and the revolutions per mile will go up 2.6%, which means slightly faster tire wear.

The new tire is .6 inches shorter, but that shouldn't be enough of a change to negatively affect the bikes steering geometry (specifically the front end rake)
 

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So I had a 150 Diablo Rosso II on the track yesterday.
I have to say I think I like the way the 140 feels better. I wasn't able to use all of the tire. Had another ride(way more experienced and faster than me) ride it and even he couldn't get all of the contact patch
 

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So I had a 150 Diablo Rosso II on the track yesterday.
I have to say I think I like the way the 140 feels better. I wasn't able to use all of the tire. Had another ride(way more experienced and faster than me) ride it and even he couldn't get all of the contact patch
Wouldn't that be safer then as you still have more tire to go before it loses traction? Just curious and I'm thinking about upgrading tires also and trying to decide between a 140/70/17 or 150/60/17 rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Wouldn't that be safer then as you still have more tire to go before it loses traction? Just curious and I'm thinking about upgrading tires also and trying to decide between a 140/70/17 or 150/60/17 rear.
The question is whether he's using all of the front. Being at the front's limit and still having another inch to go on the rear doesn't help anyone.
 

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You're likely not using all of the side of the tread due to the decreased radius of the cross-section of the tire. Follow me here. You're putting a wider tire on the same width rim which originally had a narrower tire. In essence, you're scrunching the wider tire outward, away from the rim, to cause a overall larger diameter tire. Which is why you have to go with a smaller "aspect ratio" (shorter side wall). Now, in scrunching the wider tire outward (to make it fit a narrower rim), think of what you're causing the tread of the tire to do. Is this making sense?
 
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