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Replace the fork seal, and inspect the inner fork tube carefully for damage and repair any (scratches, scrapes, dings, burrs) that is causing your seal to be damaged.

And don't over-fill the fork oil.

It's a conventional right-side-up damper-rod fork ... it's not hard. You will need a front stem stand to support the steering stem to allow the fork to be removed, and you will probably need an impact tool with a long hex bit of the appropriate size to get the bottom screw out. Improvise a seal driver out of a piece of PVC pipe of the appropriate diameter and length - slit it lengthwise to expand/contract the diameter to fine-tune it, and use the old guide bushing and seal to push the new ones in.
 

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Yep, I have used a plastic coke bottle more than once when a fork tube was leaking on the road away from home. What sucks is if you have USD forks, a ton of fork fluid will leak out when you slide the plastic up into the fork seal to clean out the debris. Then you have to ride the pogo stick back home. No thanks, I am sticking to conventional forks from now on.
 

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If you replace fork seals, my experience is to go OEM. And clean out those fork tubes and stanchions thoroughly so no debris is floating around later when you reassembly.
 

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I made a seal mate out of a water jug like the youtube guy said. It worked!
Just my 2 cents, but I don't think you should be doing any hack jobs or cheap repairs on your motorcycle. Especially on critical components. It's one thing having a suspension strut go out on a car, but when riding a motorcycle it can cost you your life!
 

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Just my 2 cents, but I don't think you should be doing any hack jobs or cheap repairs on your motorcycle. Especially on critical components. It's one thing having a suspension strut go out on a car, but when riding a motorcycle it can cost you your life!
Agreed 100%. I think the purpose of clearing debris from a leaky fork seal when you are on the road far from home is a temporary fix to enable to return home to make a proper repair. If you are just riding local, then you can slide the sealmate up into the fork seal and clear it. If you have new OEM fork seals and clean oil, then maybe that is all you need to do. Luck of the draw.

I religiously rebuild my forks about once a year. I have always felt that if the suspension is not right, then nothing is right, forget horsepower and torque.
 
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