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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I go pick up an R3 what order do I need to do these in? Buy a bike, motorcycle license, insurance. Not sure how you get a license if you don't have a bike to do a ride on. Thanks for the help!
 

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Hi. My suggestion is to not buy he bike first.
-sign up for the motorcycle course. It will waive you from taking the road test. You may still need to do the written.

-decide after that if riding is for you.

- research bikes, though I will say the R3 would be an excellent beginner and experienced rider choice. A lot of experienced riders here went from bigger to the R3.

-research financing if needed. Consider Costco auto buying program.

- figure the price of helmet, gloves, jacket, riding pants and boots into your budget.

- find the best deal on a bike.

- research insurance with a phone call or online calculator. Have the insurer save your quote. That way you can just call in and have it activated.

- enjoy that bike life.

Doing the course not only waives the test, it gives you basic skills and at the same time may help you decide if riding is for you.
 

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Get learners permit,
do lessons on riding schools bike
sit license test when the instructor thinks you should.
Get license even if you fail to pass first time if that's what happens.
Buy $1500 Ninja,
Scratch it, drop it, learn to fix it.
Get shadowed by someone with full license as much as possible early on so you don't pick up bad habits.


A year later ask yourself if you should get a brand new motorcycle many can only dream of being responsible for.
 

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It goes beyond just buying a motorcycle, having a license and insurance. Look into gear as well.. also, will it be a new bike or a used bike. If used, be prepared to shell out a bit for maintenance or some tires, etc.

My list pretty much echoes what has been listed as above.. (And pretty much how my process went..kind of lol)

Sign up for a motorcycle class
- This way you get your endorsement, and you also get an idea if you'll like riding or not.. and if you do, then proceed to..

Take your written/permit test
- After passing, you can (in California at least) hand them your endorsement from the class you took and get your license

Look into some gear
- If you're looking to save some money, look into Facebook groups or Craigslist. Also helps to visit a shop and try on different brands/sizes to see what fits you. You don't need to spend the most money, but don't opt for the cheapest stuff.

Do researching on lots of bikes and insurance
- While the new 2016 Yamaha R3 looks nice, it might be a bit pricey for you insurance wise..so that might turn you off a bit. Do browse different bikes (new and used), and different insurance companies. And like Koji said, if you have a quote you like from an insurance company, make sure to save it. So once you purchase the bike, you can go ahead and have them activate that coverage for you. Most major companies usually have an app available for download, so you'll have your insurance cards via phone app. Convenient for the ride home if you ever get pulled over until physical cards come in.. if that's your thing.

Everything else is on you. Keep your cool and enjoy the ride.

For me, I did lots and lots of research. From reading up on gear brands to riding positions to insurance coverage. From bottom to top, there's always something to read about, even without a bike, it helps to at least get an idea of what you're getting into. And for you to post on the forum, is a huge start. Good luck to you. :)
 

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As others have said, take a safety course such as the Motorcycle Rider Program through MSF. It'll get you the basic skills you need to start riding and also help you decide up front if riding is for you.... although I can't imagine you won't like it, haha.

I'd start researching bikes now. If you want to start on a 300cc bike, don't confine yourself to the R3. Look into the CBR 300 and 500 series, KTM rc390 and Ninja 300 as well. We all favor the R3, but a lot of people love those other two "starter" bikes just as much. You should try and sit on all the bikes you are considering and even test ride them at the dealer if possible once you have your licenese I was lucky enough to have a demo bike at my local dealer so I rode the R3 before buying one.

Once you have an idea on what the options are and what you do/don't want, start making your budget for gear, a bike and insurance. Budget yourself at least $500 for a proper jacket, helmet and gloves. I wear regular leather boots and blue jeans, but you can get more protective boots and riding pants if you want. Get some insurance quotes online, or even better, call up an agent or your current agent and get quotes. I've always found the online quotes to be absurdly high. A couple reference points that I was quoted (and that I pay on the R3) for full-coverage insurance : 2013 CBR 500R = $285, 2015 rc390 = $300, 2015 R3 = $225

As far as picking a bike, like I said, look at the options and figure out what is the right one for you. Decide if you are buying used or new, as this will change your budget. Scour craigslist. You can save a considerable amount of money buying bikes used, especially these "beginner" bikes, since a lot of people buy new to start riding and then upgrade to something else within a year. I've seen R3s sell for $4k with under 5000 miles, which is very lightly used. I've seen Ninja 300s with 2000 miles sell for $3-3.5k. You can get a well taken care of bike that will perform just as well as a brand new one if you look hard enough. Of course, if you want to buy new go ahead, but be ready to 1) lose at least $1000 to depreciation right away and 2) feel sad when you inevitably drop your new bike, as it happens to almost eve all new riders (and even experienced ones!). Dropping your brand new, spotless bike that you paid a premium for will make you feel like crap, but if you drop your used bike that you didn't pay a ton for you will won't feel nearly as bad.

You've already taken your first steps by posting here, so now keep moving forward!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the responses, I ride dirtbikes every now and then and love the idea of being on the street. Rode a ninja 250 and have been looking at bikes for about 6 months and overall fell in love with the R3 from reviews to the looks. I definitely am looking for a used R3 (not too easy to come by). Unfortunately in SC the course does not waive the test anymore. I have definitely done an extensive amount of research on bikes and gear (maybe too much) but I just wasn't sure how I was supposed to get the bike to the DMV to take the test if I don't have a license to drive it. Thanks for all the responses!
 

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I believe once you get done with the written test, you can own a bike even with a permit. So you could take that to take the test, or even a scooter lol. I've seen some people here in SoCal rent out scooters/bikes to use for DMV tests. But SC is probably harder to find something like that.
 

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You can never do enough research!

You can own a bike without a license or permit or anything, you just can't legally ride it on public roads. I thought the DMV had bikes there for the test for that reason? If not, talk to some local dealerships. I know a couple by me will rent out bikes for people taking the DMV test, b/c the local bike they test it on is some huge cruiser that is really hard to ride for newbies. For small fee the dealer will trailer a dirt bike or something like a ninja 300 out to the DMV for you to take the test on. A lot of dealerships will also deliver a bike to you if you purchase from them, so if you are worried about getting the bike back to your place before you are fully licensed you should make that one of your terms in the purchase (if you buy from a dealer).

If you are set on an R3 then yes, you will have a tough time finding a used one probably. I'm sure dealers will be willing to take price hits on any 2015 models still on the floor, though, so you have some bargaining power there. Otherwise you'll be paying a pretty penny for a new 2016 model, but it will still be an awesome bike!
 

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Haha, I remember when I walked into the large motorcycle dealership and the guy was trying to sell me something. I kindly informed him I was thinking about getting into motorcycles and I don't have a license yet. He then went on to say that they have no problem delivering the motorcycles for free to my house. And I honestly have to admit I was tempted right there of picking something up.

Anyway, you seem to have enough experience. As far as getting a motorcycle to the test area, that's where you need a buddy to ride it for you there or have a trailer to hitch it there. Otherwise drop an extra 75 bucks or so and do a MSF course and get your license that way. You have dirtbike experience, you should have no problem passing the course if you somehow get one of those very strict instructors, but most likely you'll just get one of the "pass everyone" type instructor.

Oh yeah, forgot the learner's permit route. Take the written, get the permit, and then you can take the motorcycle to the road test that way.

Sorry, didn't read the previous responses, most likely this was all redundant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I believe once you get done with the written test, you can own a bike even with a permit. So you could take that to take the test, or even a scooter lol. I've seen some people here in SoCal rent out scooters/bikes to use for DMV tests. But SC is probably harder to find something like that.
Couldn't find anything specifically on the written test for SC's DMV and of course I call and was told that my call would be returned in 24 hours, 2 days ago now lol :| I currently have a moped for getting to and from campus, I presume that would not cut it for the test :'D

You can never do enough research!

You can own a bike without a license or permit or anything, you just can't legally ride it on public roads. I thought the DMV had bikes there for the test for that reason? If not, talk to some local dealerships. I know a couple by me will rent out bikes for people taking the DMV test, b/c the local bike they test it on is some huge cruiser that is really hard to ride for newbies. For small fee the dealer will trailer a dirt bike or something like a ninja 300 out to the DMV for you to take the test on. A lot of dealerships will also deliver a bike to you if you purchase from them, so if you are worried about getting the bike back to your place before you are fully licensed you should make that one of your terms in the purchase (if you buy from a dealer).

If you are set on an R3 then yes, you will have a tough time finding a used one probably. I'm sure dealers will be willing to take price hits on any 2015 models still on the floor, though, so you have some bargaining power there. Otherwise you'll be paying a pretty penny for a new 2016 model, but it will still be an awesome bike!
Began to look around for one, don't mind the look of other new bikes just love the R3 for some reason :D and have had great success with yamaha for dirt bikes and jet skis so it gives me some extra comfort in choosing the R3


Haha, I remember when I walked into the large motorcycle dealership and the guy was trying to sell me something. I kindly informed him I was thinking about getting into motorcycles and I don't have a license yet. He then went on to say that they have no problem delivering the motorcycles for free to my house. And I honestly have to admit I was tempted right there of picking something up.

Anyway, you seem to have enough experience. As far as getting a motorcycle to the test area, that's where you need a buddy to ride it for you there or have a trailer to hitch it there. Otherwise drop an extra 75 bucks or so and do a MSF course and get your license that way. You have dirtbike experience, you should have no problem passing the course if you somehow get one of those very strict instructors, but most likely you'll just get one of the "pass everyone" type instructor.

Oh yeah, forgot the learner's permit route. Take the written, get the permit, and then you can take the motorcycle to the road test that way.

Sorry, didn't read the previous responses, most likely this was all redundant.
No need to apologize, need as much information as I can get from as many different people as I can. MSF unfortunately does not allow you to waive the test in SC anymore, they stopped in 2013 apparently :/
 

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Couldn't find anything specifically on the written test for SC's DMV and of course I call and was told that my call would be returned in 24 hours, 2 days ago now lol :| I currently have a moped for getting to and from campus, I presume that would not cut it for the test :'D


Began to look around for one, don't mind the look of other new bikes just love the R3 for some reason :D and have had great success with yamaha for dirt bikes and jet skis so it gives me some extra comfort in choosing the R3



No need to apologize, need as much information as I can get from as many different people as I can. MSF unfortunately does not allow you to waive the test in SC anymore, they stopped in 2013 apparently :/
Did a different organization take over? In California MSF no longer allows for the test to be waived, but the guys who do total control have taken over and that will get your road test waived.
 

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Did a different organization take over? In California MSF no longer allows for the test to be waived, but the guys who do total control have taken over and that will get your road test waived.
Yea, check into other organizations. MSF doesn't do it anymore here in SoCal, I got my endorsement through OCMT.org/CMSP..which funny enough, held the class at the same spot that MSF did (for Fullerton area at least) lol.
 

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Did a different organization take over? In California MSF no longer allows for the test to be waived, but the guys who do total control have taken over and that will get your road test waived.
At least for Northern Cal, I did my MSF course last Sept and that was good enough to waive the DMV road test. Still had to take the written test, but that was easy enough.

Surprised there's so much variation from state to state, or even different parts of California.
 

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Yea, check into other organizations. MSF doesn't do it anymore here in SoCal, I got my endorsement through OCMT.org/CMSP..which funny enough, held the class at the same spot that MSF did (for Fullerton area at least) lol.
I bumped into my MSF instructor from 3 years ago at the BMW / Triumph shop last weekend. He said something changed up here too, but I don't remember the details. It's still at the same spot here too, but different riding format, more riding, less pep talking.
 

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Iirc, the change should be statewide for all of California. Basically it comes down to contracting between DMV and the different org's from my understanding. A rider coach told one of my subordinates who took the course last year. I found a thread, but was surprised someone mentioned their DMV still took the MSF one. Maybe they didn't get the message to update the new requirements. The MSF course will still teach you safety related criteria, or other rider skills improvement. It just won't waive the test anymore, which was a good selling point for new riders.

Also, from what I have heard, California is picky in that if you move into the state and decide to get their state license, if your MSF or Total Control course was not done in California, they will make you test or redo the course. I did mine in the Middle East at a military base and that wasn't good enough for California DMV so I road tested. I called DMV about this when I first got there and they agreed that it was kind of silly wife the material is the same regardless of where you do the course.

http://advrider.com/index.php?threads/california-drops-msf-curriculum.1024956/
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
UPDATE: Got the motorcycle permit and helmet is in route. Heard a driving instructor talking about some kid who did something and he immediately told him to get out of the car lol looks like I'm not gonna go when he is there :p anyways hoping to get a bike within the next week from Fastway. Thanks for all the help guys and any other general information I need to know please feel free to tell me :D
 

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Soooo also brand new rider! Hi!
I knew, like die hard knew, that I wanted to ride even though it made me nervous at first thinking about it a lot.

I recommend registering for a riding course because it does teach you basic riding skills and helps you build on techniques you would use in normal riding. Plus you're with other beginners too so it feels like you're all in the same boat.

I will admit though I totally bought my bike before I ever took my class or got endorsed. I needed the insurance just to take my bike from the dealer. I do recommend shopping around for insurance and for a good deal on your bike.

Also! Make sure you get some good gear on your body!!!! :)
 
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