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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks,

As I continue to put more miles on the bike I'm getting more and more comfortable riding. However, one thing that is hindering my confidence in around town traffic is downshifting. Anybody else had issues downshifting. I've already experienced rear wheel locking which I don't like. What am I doing wrong in my downshifts? I'll give an example.

Traveling 45 MPH at 5K in 4th I see a red light ahead cars ahead of me stopped already. I smoothly roll off/close throttle, clutch in, downshift to 3rd only for the light to turn green ?. So I slowly release clutch but still get jerked forward while rear wheel skids a bit. Any insight to what I maybe doing wrong?

Also can someone explain rev matching? I was attempting to practice in an empty lot but the outcome I was getting was I kept getting jerked forward.

Thanks in advance for any insight.
 

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If the R3 had a slipper-clutch, you wouldn't even be asking this question. But since it does NOT.... here we are.
The R3 has low, short, tight, gearing. You really row back and forth through the gears everytime you take-off and come to a stop.
You almost need the engine to be near IDLE to downshift and just let the clutch out. OR... you need to "rev match" a bit.
Which means, when you downshift, you just give it a little throttle as you slowly release the clutch. If you do it correctly, the R3 won't jerk or skid the rear tire. I'm so used to the slipper-clutch on my CBR, I had to learn all over again how to work a bike without one. It took awhile, the R3 takes practice to be smooth with it.
One thing I do when I come to a redlight is, I shift from 4th to 3rd, then I just roll to a stop. Once I am almost stopped, I click it twice, down to 1st. Seems to work pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If the R3 had a slipper-clutch, you wouldn't even be asking this question. But since it does NOT.... here we are.
The R3 has low, short, tight, gearing. You really row back and forth through the gears everytime you take-off and come to a stop.
You almost need the engine to be near IDLE to downshift and just let the clutch out. OR... you need to "rev match" a bit.
Which means, when you downshift, you just give it a little throttle as you slowly release the clutch. If you do it correctly, the R3 won't jerk or skid the rear tire. I'm so used to the slipper-clutch on my CBR, I had to learn all over again how to work a bike without one. It took awhile, the R3 takes practice to be smooth with it.
One thing I do when I come to a redlight is, I shift from 4th to 3rd, then I just roll to a stop. Once I am almost stopped, I click it twice, down to 1st. Seems to work pretty good.
Thanks CBRpilot! It's funny you mentioned the slipper clutch because during my research when I decided I wanted to get into riding it was between the Ninja 300 which has a slipper clutch and the R3. But ultimately it just seems like more practice is what I need. Especially the rev matching. I do like your last statement because essentially that's what I'm incorporating now when I actually witness the light turn red.
 

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This bike has a gear indicator. If you see a car stopped ahead of you, you can always just pull in the clutch and shift down to first while you brake down to stop.
 

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The R3's throttle is kind of annoying for down shifting bc a blip can easily be turned into a moon rev since it's not linear, like my car's gas pedal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnXLZg_O1rk

I know this he is explaining rev matching in a car, but the idea is the same. it's a lotta fun when you get used to it
 

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a blip can easily be turned into a moon rev
I had to chuckle at this - I know exactly what you're talking about. I keep coming back to my attempts at rev-match blipping, but I end up overshooting nearly every time and practically launching myself into the backseat of the minivan in front of me. My Kawi KE100 was great about it, but only because it was so underpowered that it was hard to screw up that badly. I've only been on the R3 for a little while though, so I'm sure practice will yield better results. And in the mean time, I can rev match just fine with some tender clutch/throttle control.
 

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I find I can't blip far enough, when I'm trying to match in the upper rev range. Throttle has an extremely long throw, almost impossible to go wide open without breaking my wrist. I'm hoping the R6 throttle tube mod will make downshifting, and WOT much more comfortable.
 

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Hi mate. Rev matching is easy enough when you get used to it, but a common error is to release the clutch too slowly after a blip. If you do that, the revs will have fallen too far by the time the clutch is fully disengaged and consequently rise again when momentum and the rear wheel are dictating crank speed (on an off throttle) this causes a lurch as the motor tries to 'catch up'.

If you are getting rear wheel lock ups... then you are in too low a gear when you disengage and this happens because the motor (as it tries to catch up with the gear) overwhelms the available traction.

FYI It's actually possible to blip and downshift WITHOUT using the clutch... Now, I do not recommend this unless you have already mastered the standard technique. I mention this only to illustrate that it's all about coordination and timing. I can downshift seamlessly without touching the clutch. Zero jerk etc.

Practise the movement of tap, blip and release at (almost) the same time in sharp, snappy motions WITH THE MOTOR OFF. (not shouting btw... emphasis only) Try this to get a feel for the timing and speed required, then give it a bash... try practicing between 6th and 5th first, as they will be more 'forgiving' gears.

Let us all know how you get on buddy.

Hopefully this was of some help.
 

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practice makes perfect I found when I started doing track days that that at the end of the straight I would get wheel chatter after downshifting, went up to a control rider and asked if I should install a slipper clutch he smacked me and said **** no just practice releasing the clutch smoother and in general riding smoother

with that being said, I never had my rear wheel chatter while riding on the street because I ride pretty conservative on the streets
 

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I think it just takes time to familiarize yourself with the bike, and what mph/rpm it likes to be at for any given gear.

E.g. if I am slowing down for a turn, and I am going around 15 mph, I know I can just release the clutch without blipping the throttle and it will ease in without any fuss.

It's just like driving a car, after a while you just learn the way the transmission likes to be used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi mate. Rev matching is easy enough when you get used to it, but a common error is to release the clutch too slowly after a blip. If you do that, the revs will have fallen too far by the time the clutch is fully disengaged and consequently rise again when momentum and the rear wheel are dictating crank speed (on an off throttle) this causes a lurch as the motor tries to 'catch up'.

If you are getting rear wheel lock ups... then you are in too low a gear when you disengage and this happens because the motor (as it tries to catch up with the gear) overwhelms the available traction.

FYI It's actually possible to blip and downshift WITHOUT using the clutch... Now, I do not recommend this unless you have already mastered the standard technique. I mention this only to illustrate that it's all about coordination and timing. I can downshift seamlessly without touching the clutch. Zero jerk etc.

Practise the movement of tap, blip and release at (almost) the same time in sharp, snappy motions WITH THE MOTOR OFF. (not shouting btw... emphasis only) Try this to get a feel for the timing and speed required, then give it a bash... try practicing between 6th and 5th first, as they will be more 'forgiving' gears.

Let us all know how you get on buddy.

Hopefully this was of some help.
I really appreciate it man. I will give that a go. I does seem like time and effort just needs to be put in. Thanks again
 

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The rotation of previous gear need to match the next gear, this is harder if added with brake.

Practice makes perfect
 

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The R3 has low, short, tight, gearing.
I've been meaning to make a thread about this, but if you compare R3 to N300 gearing, the R3 has a crazy short 2nd gear, then a big jump to 3rd gear. At 5th gear they are about equal, then in 6th gear the N300 goes into overdrive more than the R3 -- which is again strange since the R3 is packing the larger engine. I don't think I would want longer legs than the R3 already has for 6th gear. I kinda wish that 3rd gear was crazy short too ... then let the spacing out with 4th / 5th / 6th. But that would probably wreck track usage. Actually I wonder if the super short 2nd gear is what dings the R3 on track corners vs the N300. N300 has more even gear spacing.
 

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87? /cringe.
I just can't make myself do anything but 93.
 
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87? /cringe.
I just can't make myself do anything but 93.
This is a complete waste of money unless you are running an ecu flash. There's no benefit to running a higher octane that what the manual suggests.


Anyway, I found blipping to be a little tricky when I first got the bike because of the never ending throttle turn, but I've got used to it in just a few hundred miles. I regularly up and down shift clutch less and it's a non issue. It just takes practice. Go to a parking lot and just run up and down the gears, preferably at low speeds so if you do lock up a wheel it doesn't hurt much.
 
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