Yamaha R3 Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, Ive had my R3 for 3 months now and Im lovin it. Last week, some guy cut in front of me in a residential street and caused me to slam my brakes and lose control. The bike got dropped on the right side. The only visible damage was a scuffed up bar end, lever and fairing. Or so I thought. The whole bike felt crooked when i was riding it home.

I took it to 2 shops and both told me its simply a bent right handlebar. However, I really think its not that at all. I thought the forks were misaligned and after doing some web research, it seemed like it was a common issue when the triple tree clamps get whacked out of alignment. Today I tried to realign the forks using a youtube video as a guide. (I cant post it apparently because of my post count)

I would say it helped a little bit. The front wheel is now centered, but the bike still feels off. Upon a closer look, I noticed the the front wheel was not centered to the rear wheel AND it seems the forks are not centered with the frame of the bike. I took pictures but i cant post them yet, i need a higher post count :(

Any help would be greatly appreciated. This is my first bike and this has me a little down. I would love a DIY solution. I really dont trust any mechanic shop. Thank you all!

PS: How many posts do i need to include pics and links?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I would start at the back and work forward. First see that the rear wheel is centered (it should be if you have not done anything such as taking the slack out of your chain). Then I would use some string and wrap it around the rear of the rear wheel/tire as high up as you can go, and then string it under the bike towards the front. Have a helper hold the bike upright while you stretch the string and moving the string to the center of the bike just touching the front of the rear tire. The string will not be touching the front tire because the front tire is not as wide as the rear. Then turn your handlebar to get the same distance between the string and tire at the front and back of the front tire. When you get the same measurement, then you will have the bike "tracking" correctly. Then if the handlebars are not aligned or squared with the wheels/tires, you will probably have twisted or slightly bent the fork tubes. I know this is probably as clear as mud, but you probably know someone who knows what I am trying to explain to you. It's using the string as a straightedge. Hope this helps.
Daryl (cwmoss)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Im certain the rear wheel is fine. The problem is definitely in the front. Could this really be bent fork tubes? Its astounding to me that that kind of drop resulted in such damage. The bike fell when i was already slowed down to 5mph lol, it really felt like a parking lot kinda drop.

I looked at the pic again and drew another reference line that pretty much cuts the bike in half. Now you can really see the problem...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Im certain the rear wheel is fine. The problem is definitely in the front. Could this really be bent fork tubes? Its astounding to me that that kind of drop resulted in such damage. The bike fell when i was already slowed down to 5mph lol, it really felt like a parking lot kinda drop.

I looked at the pic again and drew another reference line that pretty much cuts the bike in half. Now you can really see the problem...
The bike looks square from photo. As mentioned, a straight edge from back wheel to front wheel checks alignment. However, sometimes on a drop the front can be "sprung". Loosed the top triple tree clamps a couple turns, loosen the lower bolts. Be careful not to loosen lower bolts much and fort tubes will slide around. Now you can spring - or align - the bars to the fork and tighten. The only other possibility is the neck twisted, but that is unlikely unless the full weight of the bike was impacted into the front end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
I would do some measurements on the forks. Measure each side from under the top triple to the lower triple. Then from the bottom of the bottom triple to the axle. These measurements should be the same for both sides. It is hard to tell from the pics though. The pavement doesn't seem level either. Plus you can't take references from bodywork. The mounts may have been moved during the fall.

Another option is to pull the bodywork off and use a straight edge. If you have access to a garage ceiling with rafters exposed, use tie downs to hang the bike from the ceiling and pull the front forks off. Use a straight edge, or a level, to see if the fork tubes are straight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
CWMoss and EricBK have good advice (just be sure your bike is up on a front end stand before loosening the triple tree bolts!!).

You can't measure anything against bodywork. Obviously fairing brackets are much easier to bend than frame tubes. You can't tell anything from a photo like that, but if I had to guess, looking at the nose piece and headlights, it does look like your fairing brackets are bent.

If two shops told you they checked the frame alignment, I'd trust them. They've got nothing to gain by telling you the frame is straight if it isn't (and plenty to lose if you should crash and blame them). Nothing wrong with double-checking their work, but it's pretty unlikely that a very low speed tip-over bent your frame, and I'd say it's almost impossible for the frame to have been bent without some major damage to the lowers.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top