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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
so how do i know how much hp my bike has now since i did a dynotune they told me the tune goes by throttle percentage not total hp is this true i have these pictures of the stuff they gave me 20% 40% 60% 80% and 100% throttle. And what else can i do to increase hp and torque so far i have air filter, block off plate, exhaust and power commander
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
definitely feels super smooth and better take off now from a light and yea he was telling me he was going to smooth everything in the engine i need to get a new chain and hopefully that would help get a bit more hp

Looks like the last picture is the one you're looking for....100%. 37.62 hp at 20.31 torque. Also looks like he did a nice, smooth tune. Air/fuel and curve looks smooth...
 

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R3s that are stock and in good state of maintenance make about 34 to 37 rear wheel horsepower on Dynojet dynos, when properly corrected to "standard" SAE (Not "STD") ambient condition correction formula by the computer software on the dyno. You are in that range, at the high end.

Your photos unfortunately hide the correction facot applied and the degree of smoothing. We need to see the top right area of the 100% throttle run chart in order to see those pieces of information. They are labeled on a standard Dynojet chart.

Changing the chain may pick up a fraction of a horsepower, if the chain is really bad right now.

Slip-on exhausts can only change the sound, not the power output. This is because the big metal "blob" under the engine contains BOTH a catalytic converter and muffling, in addition to the end muffler that you can see. Doesn't the M4 Street Slayer remove that blob? If so, you've already gotten what that exhaust plus a dyno tune can achieve. A FULL exhaust might do a bit better.

Getting a bit more power will require milling the heads for higher compression, changing camshafts, and porting the heads, and that all is quite costly, especially since you then have to also redo the dyno tune. And, you still will only get very few more horsepower.

If you really want more power, trade your R3 on a Ninja 400. It'll be less costly (really) than doing all the mods to your R3, and you'll still have a factory warranty.

There is no need to increase the power on an R3. It's plenty responsive once properly broken in, cruises especially well at highway speeds because of the strong midrange power and excellent gearing, and the R3 is a world class bargain compared to many other larger displacement bikes. It also delivers insanely good fuel mileage - 56 to 64 miles/US gallon is normal for mine. Don't make your really nice R3 into something worse by trying to flog it into producing more power.

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yea my bike does like 58mpg and thats a picture of the top right of the page and yes the exhaust cuts the cat and also thats why im saying its weird that i did these upgrades and its saying im making 37 i feel like its not right but low end power definitely increased and my bike is broken in i bought it new 1yr ago and i now have 11k miles and i just wanted to squeeze more power i think im also gonna get a ecu flash soon and slipper clutch and im getting an r1 this yr i like to mod the toys i buy its a fun project getting to do everything myself im planning on keeping this bike till the engine dies so i wanna do all the upgrades i can

R3s that are stock and in good state of maintenance make about 34 to 37 rear wheel horsepower on Dynojet dynos, when properly corrected to "standard" SAE (Not "STD") ambient condition correction formula by the computer software on the dyno. You are in that range, at the high end.

Your photos unfortunately hide the correction facot applied and the degree of smoothing. We need to see the top right area of the 100% throttle run chart in order to see those pieces of information. They are labeled on a standard Dynojet chart.

Changing the chain may pick up a fraction of a horsepower, if the chain is really bad right now.

Slip-on exhausts can only change the sound, not the power output. This is because the big metal "blob" under the engine contains BOTH a catalytic converter and muffling, in addition to the end muffler that you can see. Doesn't the M4 Street Slayer remove that blob? If so, you've already gotten what that exhaust plus a dyno tune can achieve. A FULL exhaust might do a bit better.

Getting a bit more power will require milling the heads for higher compression, changing camshafts, and porting the heads, and that all is quite costly, especially since you then have to also redo the dyno tune. And, you still will only get very few more horsepower.

If you really want more power, trade your R3 on a Ninja 400. It'll be less costly (really) than doing all the mods to your R3, and you'll still have a factory warranty.

There is no need to increase the power on an R3. It's plenty responsive once properly broken in, cruises especially well at highway speeds because of the strong midrange power and excellent gearing, and the R3 is a world class bargain compared to many other larger displacement bikes. It also delivers insanely good fuel mileage - 56 to 64 miles/US gallon is normal for mine. Don't make your really nice R3 into something worse by trying to flog it into producing more power.

Jim G
 

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yea my bike does like 58mpg and thats a picture of the top right of the page and yes the exhaust cuts the cat and also thats why im saying its weird that i did these upgrades and its saying im making 37 i feel like its not right but low end power definitely increased and my bike is broken in i bought it new 1yr ago and i now have 11k miles and i just wanted to squeeze more power i think im also gonna get a ecu flash soon and slipper clutch and im getting an r1 this yr i like to mod the toys i buy its a fun project getting to do everything myself im planning on keeping this bike till the engine dies so i wanna do all the upgrades i can
Your chart shows SAE correction and smoothing = 5, both of which are fine. The dyno chart seems to reflect a dyno run properly done.

You realize that when you flash the ECU, you will need to either remove the Power Commander or set it to "zero changes" to the fuel signals being sent by the ECU? Otherwise, your Power Commander will unfavourably alter the new (reflashed) ECU tune. So, you will have a "deviant" tune thta combines both the Power Commander tune which reflects the costly dyno tune you had done, AND the reflashed ECU tune which will also cost you $$$. This deviant tune could damage or blow up your engine. I'm not exaggerating. And, if you "zero" the Power Commander you will wipe your costly dyno tune!

Bottom line: If you reflash your ECU, zero the Power Commander BUT only after you ensure you kept a copy of the dyno tune you paid for somewhere, either on your computer or on your tuner's computer. Othersie, you will lose what you paid for. Plus, this way, if you don't like the reflash on the ECU, you can go back to the OEM tune on the ECU and re-install the Power Commander dyno tune.

Your description of yoiur plans show that you have not done your homework on how electronic tuning via either ECU or Power Commander works. You need to do that homework before you blow either a lot of money OR blow your engine.

You can't learn what you need to know by posting here. You need to read online articles that explain how electronic tuning works. If that is too much trouble for you, stop screwing aorund with your engine because you can easily do a lot of damage.

It looks to me like your tuner did a credible job. Abandon your dreams of big power from this 320cc engine for a few more hundred dollars. It's not going to happen. Enjoy the engine instead of screwing it up.

Jim G
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
yea i dont know much about bikes but from what ive been looking at online says you can have both but i dunno and my tuner said i can go back to get my tune redone if needed imma talk to my dyno shop and see what they think and you said my dyno run was done correctly so those are my actual gains ? but at the same time i feel it running better than stock

yea my bike does like 58mpg and thats a picture of the top right of the page and yes the exhaust cuts the cat and also thats why im saying its weird that i did these upgrades and its saying im making 37 i feel like its not right but low end power definitely increased and my bike is broken in i bought it new 1yr ago and i now have 11k miles and i just wanted to squeeze more power i think im also gonna get a ecu flash soon and slipper clutch and im getting an r1 this yr i like to mod the toys i buy its a fun project getting to do everything myself im planning on keeping this bike till the engine dies so i wanna do all the upgrades i can
Your chart shows SAE correction and smoothing = 5, both of which are fine. The dyno chart seems to reflect a dyno run properly done.

You realize that when you flash the ECU, you will need to either remove the Power Commander or set it to "zero changes" to the fuel signals being sent by the ECU? Otherwise, your Power Commander will unfavourably alter the new (reflashed) ECU tune. So, you will have a "deviant" tune thta combines both the Power Commander tune which reflects the costly dyno tune you had done, AND the reflashed ECU tune which will also cost you $$$. This deviant tune could damage or blow up your engine. I'm not exaggerating. And, if you "zero" the Power Commander you will wipe your costly dyno tune!

Bottom line: If you reflash your ECU, zero the Power Commander BUT only after you ensure you kept a copy of the dyno tune you paid for somewhere, either on your computer or on your tuner's computer. Othersie, you will lose what you paid for. Plus, this way, if you don't like the reflash on the ECU, you can go back to the OEM tune on the ECU and re-install the Power Commander dyno tune.

Your description of yoiur plans show that you have not done your homework on how electronic tuning via either ECU or Power Commander works. You need to do that homework before you blow either a lot of money OR blow your engine.

You can't learn what you need to know by posting here. You need to read online articles that explain how electronic tuning works. If that is too much trouble for you, stop screwing aorund with your engine because you can easily do a lot of damage.

It looks to me like your tuner did a credible job. Abandon your dreams of big power from this 320cc engine for a few more hundred dollars. It's not going to happen. Enjoy the engine instead of screwing it up.

Jim G
 

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just don't use your Power Commander when you finally get the reflash.

Question: how did he get 10k RPM @ 20% throttle? or are the 2 graphs not analogous with each other?
Yes, but HOW does not "not use the PC when he finally gets the flash"? It is INSTALLED into the bike's wiring, and not easily removable. This is why I told him to "zero" it so that it has no effect.

AlthoughI have never actually seen someone do it, I think t's easy to get to 10,000 rpm on 20% throttle. It just takes much longer to accelerate the dyno drum.

Jim G
 

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Yes, but HOW does not "not use the PC when he finally gets the flash"? It is INSTALLED into the bike's wiring, and not easily removable. This is why I told him to "zero" it so that it has no effect.


Jim G

Power commanders are just plug and play...very easily removed. IIRC, 2 plugs and 1 cable to the battery. I would also remove it....one less electronic piece to go wrong....plus, you can recoup some monies....
 

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Power commanders are just plug and play...very easily removed. IIRC, 2 plugs and 1 cable to the battery. I would also remove it....one less electronic piece to go wrong....plus, you can recoup some monies....
I know, but The OP is clearly not very mechanical. I don't think h would know how to get the interlocking fairing pieces off, let alone the electrical connectors for the Power Commander. That's why I said what I did.

Jim G
 

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There is no need to increase the power on an R3. It's plenty responsive once properly broken in, cruises especially well at highway speeds because of the strong midrange power and excellent gearing, and the R3 is a world class bargain compared to many other larger displacement bikes. It also delivers insanely good fuel mileage - 56 to 64 miles/US gallon is normal for mine. Don't make your really nice R3 into something worse by trying to flog it into producing more power.

Jim G
While I agree that there is no “need” to increase power to the R3, saying that is ridiculous considering you are dropping thousands on a bike to make it lighter and in your own words more nimble. You also state you don’t race or ride on the track. So why chase more nimbleness? I can say (I’m not a racer, only a noob rider addicted t the track) that on the track, where nimbleness does matter far more than the street( the environment that the majority of this forum rides on), the bike is plenty nimble. Exactly how much more nimble do you need this thing to be?

Why chase a lighter weight bike? It’s plenty light compared to a 420lb 600. Why buy stickier tires? Most street riders won’t hit the edge of their tires. Why do any of the crap we do to our bikes when the bike literally performs just fine out of the crate?

Would it be fair to say there is no need to increase the nimbleness of the r3, even in stock form?
 

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While I agree that there is no “need” to increase power to the R3, saying that is ridiculous considering you are dropping thousands on a bike to make it lighter and in your own words more nimble. You also state you don’t race or ride on the track. So why chase more nimbleness? I can say (I’m not a racer, only a noob rider addicted t the track) that on the track, where nimbleness does matter far more than the street( the environment that the majority of this forum rides on), the bike is plenty nimble. Exactly how much more nimble do you need this thing to be?

Why chase a lighter weight bike? It’s plenty light compared to a 420lb 600. Why buy stickier tires? Most street riders won’t hit the edge of their tires. Why do any of the crap we do to our bikes when the bike literally performs just fine out of the crate?

Would it be fair to say there is no need to increase the nimbleness of the r3, even in stock form?
I might not have been clear enough: My point was centred on the negative effects of chasing more power:

- Not many kits available to SIGNIFICANTLY increase power on an R3. There's a reason for that: the potential gains are small and the cost benefit ratio is not good

- To get gains significant enough to feel, the reliability and driveability negatives would be high

- Even if you spend a ton of money, and tolerate the negatives, you STILL would get a lot more power, at much lower cost, and much better reliability, by just trading the R3 for a Kawasaki 400 and just putting any decent after market exhaust onto IT.

- In fact, if it's power a person is "into", why on Earth would he/she buy a 320cc motorcycle in the first place??

As for my R3 weight reduction program: I realize you don't understand or value it. But the resulting bike thrills ME even more with each additional static weight and rotational moment of inertia reduction. And none of my mods makes the bike less reliable or hurts its driveability. And, there is NO comparison between the feel of a "lightweight" 600 and my lightened R3. I've owned somewhere over 43 motorcycles (I've forgotten a few I think), and can say with experienced confidence that my lightened R3 is a pretty unique experience.

Why stickier tires? Purely for SAFETY, not for canyon carving. I value traction a lot more than I value saving a few bucks a year on longer lasting higher mileage tires.

But again, I don't expect you, everyone else, or ANYONE else for that matter, to necessarily understand or appreciate that. It is sufficient that I myself appreciate it, and that it makes my day every time I ride it. And I share what I am doing so that maybe 1, or 2, or more other forum members might take one or a few of the things I have done and try them themselves. Some of those things are NOT costly: it does not cost more to look for a lighter weight tire when tire shopping. And it makes really good practical sense to do so, since the tire, being right on the periphery of the wheel, has by far the largest impact on rotational moment of inertia. WAY more impact than a 400 series chain and sprockets for example, or a brake rotor. It's actually a "practical" thing for anyone to do, provided that the lighter tire also meets the other primary performance objectives of a tire of course.

Jim G
 

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I might not have been clear enough: My point was centred on the negative effects of chasing more power:

- Not many kits available to SIGNIFICANTLY increase power on an R3. There's a reason for that: the potential gains are small and the cost benefit ratio is not good

- To get gains significant enough to feel, the reliability and driveability negatives would be high

- Even if you spend a ton of money, and tolerate the negatives, you STILL would get a lot more power, at much lower cost, and much better reliability, by just trading the R3 for a Kawasaki 400 and just putting any decent after market exhaust onto IT.

- In fact, if it's power a person is "into", why on Earth would he/she buy a 320cc motorcycle in the first place??

As for my R3 weight reduction program: I realize you don't understand or value it. But the resulting bike thrills ME even more with each additional static weight and rotational moment of inertia reduction. And none of my mods makes the bike less reliable or hurts its driveability. And, there is NO comparison between the feel of a "lightweight" 600 and my lightened R3. I've owned somewhere over 43 motorcycles (I've forgotten a few I think), and can say with experienced confidence that my lightened R3 is a pretty unique experience.

Why stickier tires? Purely for SAFETY, not for canyon carving. I value traction a lot more than I value saving a few bucks a year on longer lasting higher mileage tires.

But again, I don't expect you, everyone else, or ANYONE else for that matter, to necessarily understand or appreciate that. It is sufficient that I myself appreciate it, and that it makes my day every time I ride it. And I share what I am doing so that maybe 1, or 2, or more other forum members might take one or a few of the things I have done and try them themselves. Some of those things are NOT costly: it does not cost more to look for a lighter weight tire when tire shopping. And it makes really good practical sense to do so, since the tire, being right on the periphery of the wheel, has by far the largest impact on rotational moment of inertia. WAY more impact than a 400 series chain and sprockets for example, or a brake rotor. It's actually a "practical" thing for anyone to do, provided that the lighter tire also meets the other primary performance objectives of a tire of course.

Jim G
That owner that wants to add more power to his bike (R3) can use the exact same argument you did. It thrills HIM.

Why add more power to an R3?maybe they want to race in a small displacement class? Or maybe not. In general, if it’s got an engine and moves, people will want to mod it. Maybe not everyone. But someone is going to.

Why mod it when he can just get a new N400? Fair argument. But then, why not get an older R6? Suspension is already good? Why not a track prepped SV? Good power, light weight, etc? Why not any other 600 that can be in the realm of the R3’s weight, for less money and less work? Cheaper than a N400. Maybe cause he specifically wants an R3 that’s more powerful than mine or yours? Why not a beater 600 modded to a 3 cylinder?

You say you want stickier tires for safety? Ride slower. Stickier tires are only going to be stickier after a certain pace and as the tire warms up. Certainly not at the one you should be riding on the street. If you honestly think that the stock tires are the problem with grip, maybe you should reassess rider skill, environment, road conditions and how your are riding on the street as well?

Actually, I do realize the value of a nimble bike. I’ve owned several not so not so nimble bikes. The 650comes to mind. I’m asking you though, when is it nimble enough? Not sure why you need it more nimble when you probably aren’t using it to it’s max nimbleness.

The argument you make in your last paragraph can literally be used in his defense for his bike and his pleasure.
 

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so how do i know how much hp my bike has now since i did a dynotune they told me the tune goes by throttle percentage not total hp is this true i have these pictures of the stuff they gave me 20% 40% 60% 80% and 100% throttle. And what else can i do to increase hp and torque so far i have air filter, block off plate, exhaust and power commander
How much did the Dyno Cost? I just bought an M4 Full Exhaust. Im trying to max the r3 out with mods just as you are, the r3 is a fun bike to ride! Thanks
 

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I might not have been clear enough: My point was centred on the negative effects of chasing more power:

- Not many kits available to SIGNIFICANTLY increase power on an R3. There's a reason for that: the potential gains are small and the cost benefit ratio is not good

- To get gains significant enough to feel, the reliability and driveability negatives would be high

- Even if you spend a ton of money, and tolerate the negatives, you STILL would get a lot more power, at much lower cost, and much better reliability, by just trading the R3 for a Kawasaki 400 and just putting any decent after market exhaust onto IT.

- In fact, if it's power a person is "into", why on Earth would he/she buy a 320cc motorcycle in the first place??

As for my R3 weight reduction program: I realize you don't understand or value it. But the resulting bike thrills ME even more with each additional static weight and rotational moment of inertia reduction. And none of my mods makes the bike less reliable or hurts its driveability. And, there is NO comparison between the feel of a "lightweight" 600 and my lightened R3. I've owned somewhere over 43 motorcycles (I've forgotten a few I think), and can say with experienced confidence that my lightened R3 is a pretty unique experience.

Why stickier tires? Purely for SAFETY, not for canyon carving. I value traction a lot more than I value saving a few bucks a year on longer lasting higher mileage tires.

But again, I don't expect you, everyone else, or ANYONE else for that matter, to necessarily understand or appreciate that. It is sufficient that I myself appreciate it, and that it makes my day every time I ride it. And I share what I am doing so that maybe 1, or 2, or more other forum members might take one or a few of the things I have done and try them themselves. Some of those things are NOT costly: it does not cost more to look for a lighter weight tire when tire shopping. And it makes really good practical sense to do so, since the tire, being right on the periphery of the wheel, has by far the largest impact on rotational moment of inertia. WAY more impact than a 400 series chain and sprockets for example, or a brake rotor. It's actually a "practical" thing for anyone to do, provided that the lighter tire also meets the other primary performance objectives of a tire of course.

Jim G
O Jim. As usual I completely agree. Why chase power on a R3? However, a light R3 is a Godsend. Bellissima Raven weighs about 321 lbs soaking wet, and is the Queen of these filthy streets!
 
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