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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone had their radiator fan come on? This is the only bike I've had that the fan hasn't come on yet. In fact, I only ever get three temp bars showing. I assume that's good and the bike handles heat well, but it is a little unexpected. I haven't been stuck for long periods in traffic on a hot sunny day yet though. The crankcase cover sure gets hot along with lots of heat from the engine. I wonder if something isn't set up right..like maybe the thermostat is off. I hope not. I need a good hot weather bike. Even my electric bike overheats...well, not the motor as much as the battery pack. It would be reassuring if there was an actual temp gauge in degrees.
 

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Has anyone had their radiator fan come on? This is the only bike I've had that the fan hasn't come on yet. In fact, I only ever get three temp bars showing. I assume that's good and the bike handles heat well, but it is a little unexpected. I haven't been stuck for long periods in traffic on a hot sunny day yet though. The crankcase cover sure gets hot along with lots of heat from the engine. I wonder if something isn't set up right..like maybe the thermostat is off. I hope not. I need a good hot weather bike. Even my electric bike overheats...well, not the motor as much as the battery pack. It would be reassuring if there was an actual temp gauge in degrees.
Mine came on several times today. 1st time after 45 minutes riding at temps in the range of 60-65F, lots of climbs. I stopped briefly and shut engine off using the kill switch. With the ignition key still on, the fan came on. Fan stopped as soon as I turned off the key.

2nd time stuck in traffic, fan came on, then cycled on and off several times as I sat there.

Gauge never went above three bars...

Not sure if its relevant but I was riding at elevations between 6,500 ft and 9,300 ft.
 

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Mine has come on several times...seems to come on rather soon I think, but Jersey Traffic will do that.

I'm guessing the temp is around 212-214 when the fan kicks on ??....my S1000RR the fan kicks on at 214 without fail....

Just let it idle, watch and listen until you hear it come on ??
 

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Has anyone had their radiator fan come on? This is the only bike I've had that the fan hasn't come on yet. In fact, I only ever get three temp bars showing. I assume that's good and the bike handles heat well, but it is a little unexpected. I haven't been stuck for long periods in traffic on a hot sunny day yet though. The crankcase cover sure gets hot along with lots of heat from the engine. I wonder if something isn't set up right..like maybe the thermostat is off. I hope not. I need a good hot weather bike. Even my electric bike overheats...well, not the motor as much as the battery pack. It would be reassuring if there was an actual temp gauge in degrees.
Sitting in traffic the fan almost always comes on for me as long as it's not cold outside. Been a couple 90+ degree days where it was on more than it was off while sitting in traffic.
 

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A motorcycle fan comes on to regulate engine temp BEFORE it gets hot.
not because its overheating.
Same as a Thermostat.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, but on some bikes the radiator is not functioning properly and the bike will overheat in spite of the fan coming on. This is common with air in the coolant or the wrong kind of coolant. From the responses, it seems like the R3 is behaving normally except perhaps the fan coming on with only 3 bars showing on the temp gauge. Seems like that is normal running temp. In fact my bike gets 3 bars after the bike is barely warmed up...within a block of setting out, and just stays there even when the engine is hot. That does seem odd. I can't say why my fan hasn't come on yet, but I plan to warm the bike up, then idle it a while to make sure it does function properly.
 

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Strange, mine starts everytime I stop or when it's standing still stationair. 3 bars all the way
 

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Discussion Starter #11
OK, so I purposely rode the bike hard in hot, sunny weather today, then stopped in idle. The fan does come on and it's quieter than other fans so I can't say for sure that it had never been on before. The bike did flash 4 bars briefly on the temp gauge just as the fan kicked in. Seems like it's working well. I still don't have a great hot weather bike though. It's only 83 F today. In another month the temps will be up to 100 and sunny and traffic can be slow. I don't mind using the shoulder if there's a wreck, but otherwise I just wait in line.
 

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Anyone would think the bike is 5 yrs old and never been serviced or daily pre ride checks done.


There is no airflow on a stationary bike, thus they have a fan.
 

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Engine temp heat increases exponentially when you reach closer to the redline.

If you are babying the bike, gently accelerating, and keeping rpm low, the fan might never come on, even in 90 degrees weather.
If you regularly accelerate beyond 8k rpm, and cruise at higher rpm ranges (eg: only ride in 4th in the city), the fan might come on, even if you're in colder weather.

A 250 is about as big as you'd want to go, aircooled.
For a 320cc to overheat from a failing cooler, it probably would have to be a pretty hot day outside, and you're tracking, or stuck in traffic and 100+ degrees temps.
I don't know if the bike would overheat before, or after myself in such conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
When I owned my GSX-R1000 I had a maintenance contract. It came with 3 additional any-time oil changes...in addition to the scheduled oil changes. I asked the chief mechanic at Kent Powersports in Selma, Tx. why I might do additional oil changes and he said that was in case you got stuck in traffic on a hot day. They were using Yamalube in the bike. I had read many times about high temps causing oil to break down, but I always thought those temps at which oil broke down was much higher than your oil ever gets even in conditions where the radiator fan stays on all the time, but his statement got me to thinking that maybe the oil temp can get too high even if the radiator fluid temp is regulated by the fan. Anyone know the answer to that? I mean this mechanic seems to know about motorcycles. The Gixxer had an actual temp gauge and the fan would kick on when the radiator fluid temp was 220 F or so. I do know oil temp and radiator fluid temp are not equal.
 

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The fan is fairly quiet, so you may not notice it...
For contrast, the fan on my CBR500R was fairly loud and I knew the second it turn on.
 

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When I owned my GSX-R1000 I had a maintenance contract. It came with 3 additional any-time oil changes...in addition to the scheduled oil changes. I asked the chief mechanic at Kent Powersports in Selma, Tx. why I might do additional oil changes and he said that was in case you got stuck in traffic on a hot day. They were using Yamalube in the bike. I had read many times about high temps causing oil to break down, but I always thought those temps at which oil broke down was much higher than your oil ever gets even in conditions where the radiator fan stays on all the time, but his statement got me to thinking that maybe the oil temp can get too high even if the radiator fluid temp is regulated by the fan. Anyone know the answer to that? I mean this mechanic seems to know about motorcycles. The Gixxer had an actual temp gauge and the fan would kick on when the radiator fluid temp was 220 F or so. I do know oil temp and radiator fluid temp are not equal.
they change the type of oil to accommodate for the higher temp weather. i think its a heaver weight for summer and a lighter weight for winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You would think, but that was mostly when people used single grade oils. Piaggio uses the same AGIP 5W40 synthetic in its bikes for the entire N. American market year around. You would be talking temps from -10 to 100 F. There again just as coolant temp won't be the same as oil temp, neither are the same as engine temp, or more specifically the valve or rod temp when those fail from heat. Still you want to do everything you can to keep the temp down and the oil working.
 

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This is slightly off topic but when is the bike warmed up and ready to ride as usual (as in, not keeping the revs lower). On my CBR the coolant temp gague took a while to get to 3 bars, but on the R3 it gets to 3 bars quickly. When can I push the bike into higher rev ranges?

Also, how low should I keep the RPMS during warm up? I've been keeping it below 8K RPMS until I think it has warmed up. Just want to make sure I'm not abusing the bike!
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Good questions. I have read to keep the revs at 3000 rpms until the bike is warm. Yes, 3 bars show up quickly...before the engine is warmed up enough to ride it hard. I keep riding at 3000 rpms for another 2 min. after I see 3 bars, then ride it harder, but not full out until I am sure the engine is HOT which takes a good 10 min. from the time you set off...longer in cold weather. You can always reach down and feel the crankcase. It takes bikes that have temp gauges a good 5 min of riding to get the coolant temp up to normal running temp and I wouldn't run it hard before that, but I have nothing to really prove it is good or bad to do it that way....except all the warnings about not racing a cold engine. Anyway, I say after 5 min. of riding at 3000 rpms, you are OK to increase the throttle. When I break in a new engine, I would not take the bike to redline even after 5 min. It takes 10 min to get the bike really hot which is probably where you want it to be to ride it hard. I am old enough to remember carbs and chokes and these times kind of correspond to how you would manage those too....2 min to warm up before setting off, 5 min of riding at 3000 rpms, normal riding, another 5 min., then ride as hard as you want. This is mostly opinion. You don't want to idle a cold bike too long, it can foul up the spark plug, among other bad things, so 2 min. is long enough to warm up, but not too long to wait before setting out. I once let my FZ07 warm up too long...maybe 5 min. and it coughed and shut off. That was too long to warm the bike up.
 
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