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Hello Everyone! Sorry for the long post but I'm really excited to share some of my initial thoughts/experiences!

A little about me: I'm in my late 20s and live in the South Bay area of Los Angeles. Moved out here about 2 years ago from the East Coast for work. Always wanted a bike but never was in a financial/geographical situation for it to be feasable - until now :D.

Just picked up a brand new leftover 2015 Team Blue R3 on Tuesday...but had to let it sit in my garage for two agonizing days until my on-the-road test waiver came in from my CMSP course (New California version of the MSF) - so I could get my CA endorsement! (I had the salesman put it in his pickup truck and drive it to my house as part of our negotiation).

This is my first bike and the CMSP course was my first time ever riding. Was definitely an amazing, but sobering experience. I pick up things pretty quickly, and felt like compared to my classmates did pretty well. I'm a pretty avid mountain biker, surfer, and skier - so felt I'd have an edge with balance and control. But after watching the instructors riding, and subsequently watching people on the road riding around - it was very clear I have absolutely no clue what I'm doing and it will take years before I consider myself a "skilled rider."

First thoughts on riding the R3, and riding in general:
1) Wow the engine braking is MASSIVE. I've been driving a stick-shift car for years and it's way more than any vehicle I've experienced. Also night and day compared to the Honda Nighthawk I used in the MSF course. I barely need to use the brake when I'm coming to a planned stop...just downshift and the engine does the rest.

2) RIDING IS SO MUCH FREAKING FUN! I'm finding any excuse whatsoever to take out the bike to ride. 'Oh I need some milk?' - better make a run to 7-11....but not the one 2 blocks down, that will be crowded. Should go to the one five miles away instead. Get back and "whoops, forgot to get pasta. But should go to the grocery store 15 mins away instead because they have better prices." Get there and "hmm...they only have rotelli...I prefer rotini. Guess I should check the other store across town."

3) Quite a sweaty pain to be ATGATT in leather in LA - but I'm pretty fond of my skin, and like my bones in their current configuration. I also don't quite trust my skills/muscle memory in an emergency situation yet...so don't want to risk it. But people do look at me like I'm an alien when I walk into a store in full gear, which is amusing at the moment.

3) I am constantly forgetting/reminding myself to turn off my turn signals. My car does it automatically and since I can't hear the click or really see the light that well such as in a car, I find myself a quarter mile down the road before I realize half the time.

4) Target Fixation is a real and terrifying thing. Even though we endlessly drilled and practiced on "turning your face" in the CMSP course...I still have already had a couple close calls with tight turns out on the road. In a car I'm used to monitoring the possible threat while turning, such as an oncoming car in the other lane when crossing the road to turn, or a stationary car in front of me while turning right. It was easy to ignore this instinct when in a parking lot with little cones as "cars", but WAY more difficult when instead of a cone it's a 4000lb hunk of steel barreling down the road...

5) Speed and Exposure Differences: *Riding down the road in 3rd gear for the first time* "Holy crap I this is the fastest I've ever gone in my life it's like I'm sitting on a cruise missile, I have to be going at least 110 right now, if I crash all that will be left is a red streak on the ground!" *Glances down at speedometer...37mph*
I also look at every car on the road with me with a level of paranoia as if it was a drunk 7 year old blind amish child behind the wheel of a motorized vehicle for the first time.

6) Thank God I got an R3: Some friends of mine (And the internet) said someone of my age would be fine getting a 600cc class and that I would get bored of the R3 too quickly. First day of riding the R3 I was already glad I ignored that advice. I was turning too sharp at maybe 2-3mph into my driveway and the bike started falling over. Thankfully since the R3 only weighs ~360lbs, and I was able to stomp my leg down and take that weight on my quads and keep it upright. No way I could have done that on a bigger bike. The R3 has been very forgiving of my little mistakes (such as downshifting without correct rev matching, too much front brake, poor throttle control, etc), that surely would have spelled local newsworthy disaster on a supersport (well maybe not in LA...but newsworthy in a normal place).

Anyways happy to be here - already learned a ton reading a bunch on the threads, and hope to be an active contributor on the forum! Any advice you have would be very appreciated!
 

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your Report of being a new R3 rider

Hello Everyone! Sorry for the long post but I'm really excited to share some of my initial thoughts/experiences!

A little about me: I'm in my late 20s and live in the South Bay area of Los Angeles. Moved out here about 2 years ago from the East Coast for work. Always wanted a bike but never was in a financial/geographical situation for it to be feasable - until now :D.

Just picked up a brand new leftover 2015 Team Blue R3 on Tuesday...but had to let it sit in my garage for two agonizing days until my on-the-road test waiver came in from my CMSP course (New California version of the MSF) - so I could get my CA endorsement! (I had the salesman put it in his pickup truck and drive it to my house as part of our negotiation).

This is my first bike and the CMSP course was my first time ever riding. Was definitely an amazing, but sobering experience. I pick up things pretty quickly, and felt like compared to my classmates did pretty well. I'm a pretty avid mountain biker, surfer, and skier - so felt I'd have an edge with balance and control. But after watching the instructors riding, and subsequently watching people on the road riding around - it was very clear I have absolutely no clue what I'm doing and it will take years before I consider myself a "skilled rider."

First thoughts on riding the R3, and riding in general:
1) Wow the engine braking is MASSIVE. I've been driving a stick-shift car for years and it's way more than any vehicle I've experienced. Also night and day compared to the Honda Nighthawk I used in the MSF course. I barely need to use the brake when I'm coming to a planned stop...just downshift and the engine does the rest.

2) RIDING IS SO MUCH FREAKING FUN! I'm finding any excuse whatsoever to take out the bike to ride. 'Oh I need some milk?' - better make a run to 7-11....but not the one 2 blocks down, that will be crowded. Should go to the one five miles away instead. Get back and "whoops, forgot to get pasta. But should go to the grocery store 15 mins away instead because they have better prices." Get there and "hmm...they only have rotelli...I prefer rotini. Guess I should check the other store across town."

3) Quite a sweaty pain to be ATGATT in leather in LA - but I'm pretty fond of my skin, and like my bones in their current configuration. I also don't quite trust my skills/muscle memory in an emergency situation yet...so don't want to risk it. But people do look at me like I'm an alien when I walk into a store in full gear, which is amusing at the moment.

3) I am constantly forgetting/reminding myself to turn off my turn signals. My car does it automatically and since I can't hear the click or really see the light that well such as in a car, I find myself a quarter mile down the road before I realize half the time.

4) Target Fixation is a real and terrifying thing. Even though we endlessly drilled and practiced on "turning your face" in the CMSP course...I still have already had a couple close calls with tight turns out on the road. In a car I'm used to monitoring the possible threat while turning, such as an oncoming car in the other lane when crossing the road to turn, or a stationary car in front of me while turning right. It was easy to ignore this instinct when in a parking lot with little cones as "cars", but WAY more difficult when instead of a cone it's a 4000lb hunk of steel barreling down the road...

5) Speed and Exposure Differences: *Riding down the road in 3rd gear for the first time* "Holy crap I this is the fastest I've ever gone in my life it's like I'm sitting on a cruise missile, I have to be going at least 110 right now, if I crash all that will be left is a red streak on the ground!" *Glances down at speedometer...37mph*
I also look at every car on the road with me with a level of paranoia as if it was a drunk 7 year old blind amish child behind the wheel of a motorized vehicle for the first time.

6) Thank God I got an R3: Some friends of mine (And the internet) said someone of my age would be fine getting a 600cc class and that I would get bored of the R3 too quickly. First day of riding the R3 I was already glad I ignored that advice. I was turning too sharp at maybe 2-3mph into my driveway and the bike started falling over. Thankfully since the R3 only weighs ~360lbs, and I was able to stomp my leg down and take that weight on my quads and keep it upright. No way I could have done that on a bigger bike. The R3 has been very forgiving of my little mistakes (such as downshifting without correct rev matching, too much front brake, poor throttle control, etc), that surely would have spelled local newsworthy disaster on a supersport (well maybe not in LA...but newsworthy in a normal place).

Anyways happy to be here - already learned a ton reading a bunch on the threads, and hope to be an active contributor on the forum! Any advice you have would be very appreciated!
A very good report of new ownership, keep riding safely always
 

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I love your attitude. Healthy paranoia is essential to years of fun on a bike.

Too many new riders underestimate the errors they will make even after a few thousand miles of riding. The R3's progressive throttle prevents many mis-shift misadventures for newbies. (If you've ever seen someone pin even a 600 at an apex when they thought they had a higher gear, you know what I'm talking about).

Beyond the forgiving throttle there are no rider aids on your bike, so you will get a fine education on rev-matching and threshold braking, etc. When you're ready to rip, this little bike is ready to oblige :).

Welcome and enjoy!
 

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Welcome! I honestly could not have summarized my experience on the R3 any better than you did.

I will add that I was riding a CBR 125 during my course and it's even lighter than the R3. First time I sat on an R6, it honestly felt like an enormous pig. Didn't really like it at all. I find the R3 to be 'just right' size wise for me and I know what you mean about riding a missile! I've hit the highway a few times now and I literally feel like I'm flying.

One thing I will suggest since you are riding properly with all your gear - get some ear plugs. Even the cheapy foam ones. Reducing the wind noise is a good long term idea to prevent long term hearing loss. I've done what you do too - go to the grocery store for milk and bread and it takes 30 mins instead of 10 :D

Enjoy the new bike and ride safe!
 

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*Riding down the road in 3rd gear for the first time* "Holy crap this is the fastest I've ever gone in my life it's like I'm sitting on a cruise missile, I have to be going at least 110 right now, if I crash all that will be left is a red streak on the ground!" *Glances down at speedometer...37mph*
:laugh:
This is why motorcycles are so much fun. You get that sense of speed, because you are out in the wind.
Wait until you ride a 1000 for the first time. It's a game changer.
 

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I can relate to everything to stated. The R3 is not my first bike but it is my first bike since taking a 20 year break from street bikes.

I laughed at your feeling of riding a cruise missile, looking down and seeing 37mph. I was the same way when I first got on my new R3.
Now, I slowly cruise through windy back roads, come up behind a car barely rolling along, scream at them to speed up or get out of the way and then I look down... 48mph. :D
 

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Hello Everyone! Sorry for the long post but I'm really excited to share some of my initial thoughts/experiences!

A little about me: I'm in my late 20s and live in the South Bay area of Los Angeles. Moved out here about 2 years ago from the East Coast for work. Always wanted a bike but never was in a financial/geographical situation for it to be feasable - until now :D.

Just picked up a brand new leftover 2015 Team Blue R3 on Tuesday...but had to let it sit in my garage for two agonizing days until my on-the-road test waiver came in from my CMSP course (New California version of the MSF) - so I could get my CA endorsement! (I had the salesman put it in his pickup truck and drive it to my house as part of our negotiation).

This is my first bike and the CMSP course was my first time ever riding. Was definitely an amazing, but sobering experience. I pick up things pretty quickly, and felt like compared to my classmates did pretty well. I'm a pretty avid mountain biker, surfer, and skier - so felt I'd have an edge with balance and control. But after watching the instructors riding, and subsequently watching people on the road riding around - it was very clear I have absolutely no clue what I'm doing and it will take years before I consider myself a "skilled rider."

First thoughts on riding the R3, and riding in general:
1) Wow the engine braking is MASSIVE. I've been driving a stick-shift car for years and it's way more than any vehicle I've experienced. Also night and day compared to the Honda Nighthawk I used in the MSF course. I barely need to use the brake when I'm coming to a planned stop...just downshift and the engine does the rest.

2) RIDING IS SO MUCH FREAKING FUN! I'm finding any excuse whatsoever to take out the bike to ride. 'Oh I need some milk?' - better make a run to 7-11....but not the one 2 blocks down, that will be crowded. Should go to the one five miles away instead. Get back and "whoops, forgot to get pasta. But should go to the grocery store 15 mins away instead because they have better prices." Get there and "hmm...they only have rotelli...I prefer rotini. Guess I should check the other store across town."

3) Quite a sweaty pain to be ATGATT in leather in LA - but I'm pretty fond of my skin, and like my bones in their current configuration. I also don't quite trust my skills/muscle memory in an emergency situation yet...so don't want to risk it. But people do look at me like I'm an alien when I walk into a store in full gear, which is amusing at the moment.

3) I am constantly forgetting/reminding myself to turn off my turn signals. My car does it automatically and since I can't hear the click or really see the light that well such as in a car, I find myself a quarter mile down the road before I realize half the time.

4) Target Fixation is a real and terrifying thing. Even though we endlessly drilled and practiced on "turning your face" in the CMSP course...I still have already had a couple close calls with tight turns out on the road. In a car I'm used to monitoring the possible threat while turning, such as an oncoming car in the other lane when crossing the road to turn, or a stationary car in front of me while turning right. It was easy to ignore this instinct when in a parking lot with little cones as "cars", but WAY more difficult when instead of a cone it's a 4000lb hunk of steel barreling down the road...

5) Speed and Exposure Differences: *Riding down the road in 3rd gear for the first time* "Holy crap I this is the fastest I've ever gone in my life it's like I'm sitting on a cruise missile, I have to be going at least 110 right now, if I crash all that will be left is a red streak on the ground!" *Glances down at speedometer...37mph*
I also look at every car on the road with me with a level of paranoia as if it was a drunk 7 year old blind amish child behind the wheel of a motorized vehicle for the first time.

6) Thank God I got an R3: Some friends of mine (And the internet) said someone of my age would be fine getting a 600cc class and that I would get bored of the R3 too quickly. First day of riding the R3 I was already glad I ignored that advice. I was turning too sharp at maybe 2-3mph into my driveway and the bike started falling over. Thankfully since the R3 only weighs ~360lbs, and I was able to stomp my leg down and take that weight on my quads and keep it upright. No way I could have done that on a bigger bike. The R3 has been very forgiving of my little mistakes (such as downshifting without correct rev matching, too much front brake, poor throttle control, etc), that surely would have spelled local newsworthy disaster on a supersport (well maybe not in LA...but newsworthy in a normal place).

Anyways happy to be here - already learned a ton reading a bunch on the threads, and hope to be an active contributor on the forum! Any advice you have would be very appreciated!
Nice, good job with taking the course. Take your time and continue to be safe. Once you become more comfortable on it it'll be like skiing where don't tunnel vision yourself to death.

I can relate to a lot of what you said since I'm only on my new R3 just about 3 months now. Tunnel vision was getting to be a problem at first but I realized it and learned to trust the bike more.

Another California rider :)
 

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