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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone. I am almost at 10 hours seat time, and I have been practicing at a empty parking lot early in the morning when cars aren't on the road as much. When it was time to go, traffic had picked up a little more than usual. Everything was fine up until a car went around me and drive super close. Shook me up and I could t do anything right. Stalled twice in the red light and the bike tipped over and broke my right foot peg trying to save it. I decided to push it home because I realized at that moment, I am scared to ride in Traffic. How did you all get over your riding fears, if you have any?
 

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The sensation of speed on a motorcycle is entirely different than in a car so you're feeling like 30 was fast is perfectly normal and you will get used to it. There's a lot of things different on a bike such as the first time you lean it over around a corner at speed. All I can add is you will eventually get used to it, just like riding a bicycle or anything else you do for the first few times.
 
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I should have mentioned get good riding gear, helmet, jacket, gloves, boots etc, which will help you get through your initial fears. And yes you also get used to being next to cars at speed, they're not as close as you perceive them to be.
PS When I got the R3 it was about 20 years since I stopped riding. The day it was delivered I took a short ride around my small neighborhood. It was located off a two lane 60 mph blacktop road so there was no chance to warm up to riding at speed. There was some fear/trepidation about pulling into and riding along 60 mph traffic with no warmup but someone once said courage is not the lack of fear but the over coming of fear. Yes I had a lot of previous experience so it's different from your situation, but maybe not by much. I had totally forgot about the feel of the wind resistance at that speed.
 

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As stated above ^...... Good gear is your best bet for getting comfortable, rider education is a close second. I'm 51 years old, and been riding for as long as I can remember. When my wife wanted to learn to ride a couple years ago, I insisted she take the MSF new rider course. I knew If I tried to "teach" her, I'd leave out a bunch of information that is second nature to me. I'm a rider-coach at my local track. I have several friends that are rider-coaches, as well as MSF instructors. The MSF course is worth every dollar spent by at least 10X over!!! Look into a local course in your area. You can do this!!!! Good luck-
 

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Im sure every new rider has felt the way you do. Our sport can be quite scary at times. My advice.. Ride alot more.. Ride so much that you become numb to all the near fatals. Dont ride scared.. Cagers and bikes can smell fear. Your confidence will build with time.. Just take it slow.
 

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Obviously different countries, but I'm pretty confident you'll have similar options available. I was somewhat terrified when I first started out and it took me a couple of weeks to build up some confidence and awareness of my surroundings.

1. Do some sort of basic handling skills test before going on the road (at the very least a lot of parking lot riding)
In NZ we have a BHST (Basic handling skills test) which you must pass before being allowed on the road

2. Do some sort of on motorcycle road course
We also have "Ride forever" courses which teach new riders right through to veteran riders (price ranging from free to $50nzd)

3. Ride in less built up suburban back streets as much as you can before riding on busy roads
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The sensation of speed on a motorcycle is entirely different than in a car so you're feeling like 30 was fast is perfectly normal and you will get used to it. There's a lot of things different on a bike such as the first time you lean it over around a corner at speed. All I can add is you will eventually get used to it, just like riding a bicycle or anything else you do for the first few times.
I should have mentioned get good riding gear, helmet, jacket, gloves, boots etc, which will help you get through your initial fears. And yes you also get used to being next to cars at speed, they're not as close as you perceive them to be.
PS When I got the R3 it was about 20 years since I stopped riding. The day it was delivered I took a short ride around my small neighborhood. It was located off a two lane 60 mph blacktop road so there was no chance to warm up to riding at speed. There was some fear/trepidation about pulling into and riding along 60 mph traffic with no warmup but someone once said courage is not the lack of fear but the over coming of fear. Yes I had a lot of previous experience so it's different from your situation, but maybe not by much. I had totally forgot about the feel of the wind resistance at that speed.
Part of it is hurting myself...the other part is damaging the bike. I don't know what I'm afraid of more. Lol. I only have the basic gear. Need to get pants and jacket.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
As stated above ^...... Good gear is your best bet for getting comfortable, rider education is a close second. I'm 51 years old, and been riding for as long as I can remember. When my wife wanted to learn to ride a couple years ago, I insisted she take the MSF new rider course. I knew If I tried to "teach" her, I'd leave out a bunch of information that is second nature to me. I'm a rider-coach at my local track. I have several friends that are rider-coaches, as well as MSF instructors. The MSF course is worth every dollar spent by at least 10X over!!! Look into a local course in your area. You can do this!!!! Good luck-
Thank you Cornerslider. I will look into that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Obviously different countries, but I'm pretty confident you'll have similar options available. I was somewhat terrified when I first started out and it took me a couple of weeks to build up some confidence and awareness of my surroundings.

1. Do some sort of basic handling skills test before going on the road (at the very least a lot of parking lot riding)
In NZ we have a BHST (Basic handling skills test) which you must pass before being allowed on the road

2. Do some sort of on motorcycle road course
We also have "Ride forever" courses which teach new riders right through to veteran riders (price ranging from free to $50nzd)

3. Ride in less built up suburban back streets as much as you can before riding on busy roads
So late last night I was in the internet looking for schools, the best one 45 minutes north of my location. It's really not that expensive, but due to Covid, they are only taking limited class sizes. Hopefully I can get in one before it gets too cold to ride.
 

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Yes, the first time on the bike I felt as if I was going 60-65kmph, but when I looked at the speedo, it showed 35kmph. It was scary. However, I got accustomed to speed very fast though, maybe on the second or third time riding I was comfortable going 60-70kmph. The cars in close proximity also felt weird first time but it got better the second and third time riding. I dropped my bike in a slow corner on my second ride. Then, while practicing U-turn in the parking lot I dropped my bike 2 more times. I couldn't properly manage clutch and throttle.


When you start feeling comfortable performing general basic riding, your next challenge will be to overcome the fear of lane filtering (if your laws permit), especially the situations when the lights turn green and you are still in between cars crawling ahead and now everyone has started moving and you have to merge and some jerks will try to block you. Then, when you master lane filtering, your next step is to get used to lane splitting, which is more dangerous and requires more finesse.

After a while you'll get used to that as well to the point that you will no longer care whereabouts you are in the traffic, how many cars or jerk drivers are next to you, at what speed they are moving and if you are in between cars when lights turn green. It will still require quite a bit of brain work to keep calculating and predicting possible car maneuvers and your possible path of travel in advance and long traffic jams may exhaust your brain but you won't really care if you can do so or not. You may choose not to filter or split because you just need a little time to relax and just sit in traffic.

You don't have problems walking along a busy street with lots and lots of people around you and you have no trouble navigating in such a crowd, right? Eventually, you'll obtain the same skill on your bike around other cars and traffic in general if you keep riding.
 

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You will make mistakes. Everyone does. You will have close calls due to those mistakes. You will fall. This is normal process of learning. Just keep moving forward regardless of the faults or obstacles that block your path. "That's how winning is done!"
 

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Ride with a friend who is an experienced rider. Does not matter if your friend is older or younger than you, just matters if he (she) has good focus and uses common sense. Usually any rider who is boastful or arrogant about their skill is someone to avoid as a riding buddy.
 

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Part of it is hurting myself...the other part is damaging the bike. I don't know what I'm afraid of more. Lol. I only have the basic gear. Need to get pants and jacket.
Nobody wants their bike or themselves to get hurt, but you cant live with fear. You must face your fears to overcome them. Respect the learning process, trust your instincts, ride within your limits, and trust nothing with more then 3 wheels.
Your boy Max.
 

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having just got back on a bike after a huge crash 5 years ago i can understand the fear but overthinking things and being tense and nervous is not good for you or anyone else on the road.

do you guys over in the usa not have to take a entree lvl coarse before being allowed on the road? i hope the one you found goes well.
 

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having just got back on a bike after a huge crash 5 years ago i can understand the fear but overthinking things and being tense and nervous is not good for you or anyone else on the road.

do you guys over in the usa not have to take a entree lvl coarse before being allowed on the road? i hope the one you found goes well.
It is not required that you take a safety course to get the license in any state that I know of unless you are young(under 18). All that is technically required is a written test and a skills test on a motorcycle. In my experience if you take the MSF course and pass, you get your license that way instead of taking the DMV tests. You also actually learn things.

Murika isn't really about requiring people know how to do things to do them. :confused:
 

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[QUOTE="wolf,

do you guys over in the usa not have to take a entree lvl coarse before being allowed on the road? i hope the one you found goes well.
[/QUOTE]
Psh..
Written learners permit and $8.05
805 4 life!
P.s. srry 4 crash mate.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yes, the first time on the bike I felt as if I was going 60-65kmph, but when I looked at the speedo, it showed 35kmph. It was scary. However, I got accustomed to speed very fast though, maybe on the second or third time riding I was comfortable going 60-70kmph. The cars in close proximity also felt weird first time but it got better the second and third time riding. I dropped my bike in a slow corner on my second ride. Then, while practicing U-turn in the parking lot I dropped my bike 2 more times. I couldn't properly manage clutch and throttle.


When you start feeling comfortable performing general basic riding, your next challenge will be to overcome the fear of lane filtering (if your laws permit), especially the situations when the lights turn green and you are still in between cars crawling ahead and now everyone has started moving and you have to merge and some jerks will try to block you. Then, when you master lane filtering, your next step is to get used to lane splitting, which is more dangerous and requires more finesse.

After a while you'll get used to that as well to the point that you will no longer care whereabouts you are in the traffic, how many cars or jerk drivers are next to you, at what speed they are moving and if you are in between cars when lights turn green. It will still require quite a bit of brain work to keep calculating and predicting possible car maneuvers and your possible path of travel in advance and long traffic jams may exhaust your brain but you won't really care if you can do so or not. You may choose not to filter or split because you just need a little time to relax and just sit in traffic.

You don't have problems walking along a busy street with lots and lots of people around you and you have no trouble navigating in such a crowd, right? Eventually, you'll obtain the same skill on your bike around other cars and traffic in general if you keep riding.
Wow, thank you, privilege15. You and everyone else have been very encouraging. It means the world to me.
 

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1. Practice in a parking lot, be familiar with your ride :)
2. Wear your gear, trust me gives you confidence in the road.
3. Ride with a friend that has experience. For my instance 3 weeks in riding went for a group ride for a 200 mile canyon ride but they sandwich me in between. It was very pleasant ride, next thing I know "hey [email protected] I can do this"
4. Slowly introduce yourself to slow roads IE less traffic areas first, then go for something that is a little bit busy.
5. Trust your beautiful machine, take care of her and she'll take care of you.

Trust the guys above man on their advice very good people here. Welcome to the culture, I'm really hooked.
 

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Hey everyone. I am almost at 10 hours seat time, and I have been practicing at a empty parking lot early in the morning when cars aren't on the road as much. When it was time to go, traffic had picked up a little more than usual. Everything was fine up until a car went around me and drive super close. Shook me up and I could t do anything right. Stalled twice in the red light and the bike tipped over and broke my right foot peg trying to save it. I decided to push it home because I realized at that moment, I am scared to ride in Traffic. How did you all get over your riding fears, if you have any?
Try finding a quiet neighborhood woth maybe a 30 -35 mile an hour main road and practice in there for a while. Go down side streets and back to main road. Great practice for stops and starts and getting use to light traffic
 
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