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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So it finally happened, I low-slid my bike as idiotic-new-rider me decided to do 35 mph on a 120 degree turn in 45 degree weather. Thankfully no traffic was around and I only scraped my knee. Only a jacket and helmet was worn as protective gear. In all honesty, I am really glad I did. Prior to this, I was racing and tailgating every car I could come upon, bunny starting at every stoplight, and driving completely recklessly. This accident really woke me, I now need to take it easy. For real. I am a young rider, I need to be ATGATT, and take it slow.

Thankfully no injuries, I only scraped my knee a bit.

Thoughts? Did the previous owner install frame sliders on the handlebars? I really wish I had sliders on, would've saved me a huge hassle of replacing components. Have you guys crashed/slid your R3 or any bike as a new rider yet? I think the only thing that was damaged was my pride...and bike. See pics

EDIT: I have determined the cause of the accident to be leaning far beyond my ability and subsequently putting most of the bikes weight on the left foot-peg. This then caused the rear end to be lifted up and thus losing grip resulting in a low-slide. Its visible by seeing the left foot-peg twisted/deformed about the little "scrape peg" below the foot-peg.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
You can barely ride and you’re already talking about upgrading to an R6 or R1?

Try upgrading your tires and suspension first.

A crash on a 600 or 1000 is far less forgiving physically, mentally, and financially.
I was literally thinking this as I crashed. I know, i know....

And I can't "barely ride", we're all bound to fall. What I did was a classic rookie mistake. There's certainly room for improvement,
 

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And some of us old farts are looking back and wondering why we didn't have bigger asperations and dreams. While you're getting familiar with your R3, start saving up for that R1. It'll be in your garage before you know it.
 

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I was literally thinking this as I crashed. I know, i know....

And I can't "barely ride", we're all bound to fall. What I did was a classic rookie mistake. There's certainly room for improvement,
Significantly less room for improvement when the stakes are higher on a bigger, faster bike.
 

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Like i mentioned in the other thread you made, there’s a reason why some people call 1000s “maker meeters.”
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Like i mentioned in the other thread you made, there’s a reason why some people call 1000s “maker meeters.”
No, I'm saying there's room for improvement in my riding skills, not on which bike. But like I said prior, I'll be sticking to my R3 for now not because I am scared but because I genuinely think this is a nice bike. Accidents happen to everyone, what matters is how you deal with it in the end
 

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......Accidents happen to everyone, what matters is how you deal with it in the end
Todo lo que siempre has querido está en el otro lado del miedo. . . Cuando vences tus miedos, se destruyen tus limites.

...Everything that you have ever wanted is beyond your fear. When you overcome your fears, then you have destroyed your limits.

So yes, it is all about how you deal with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
......Accidents happen to everyone, what matters is how you deal with it in the end
Todo lo que siempre has querido está en el otro lado del miedo. . . Cuando vences tus miedos, se destruyen tus limites.

...Everything that you have ever wanted is beyond your fear. When you overcome your fears, then you have destroyed your limits.

So yes, it is all about how you deal with it.
Si, esta verdad. Gracias mi amigo

Thank you, I really appreciate the motivation
 

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No, I'm saying there's room for improvement in my riding skills, not on which bike. But like I said prior, I'll be sticking to my R3 for now not because I am scared but because I genuinely think this is a nice bike. accidents happen to everyone, what matters is how you deal with it in the end
Try took at it like this.... The R3 is REALLY forgiving, the R6- not so much, the R1= not at ALL!!! I'm an experienced track rider, and have been riding motorcycles for over 40 years. Everyone told me the R6 is the ultimate track bike, so I bought one. I absolutely hated it!! I was track riding the R6 on a September day in 2015 (maybe 60 degrees). I thought my tires were warmed up enough, so I hammered it coming out of a corner. I spun the rear wheel up, sliding all over the place, and it developed into a full blown tank-slapper!!!! I was fortunate enough to have saved it without incident. It all happened really fast!!! At that moment, I realized I was in over my head. I scared myself, as well as my friends that were near me that day. I sold the R6 a few weeks later..... As you learned, you can still really scare yourself on an R3. Your bike actually didn't get too beat up. Most people crash (or at least "drop") their first bike, it happens. Be glad you were on a relatively inexpensive bike to fix back up. I put case sliders, axle sliders, and frame siders on everything own. My best advise is get those things on your R3 when your fixing it back up. My personal opinion, is stay away from "no cut" frame sliders. Most (not all) of them are only good in a tip-over in a parking lot. Get the direct bolt-on to the frame. Woodcraft makes some really nice frame sliders for about $70. Cut the hole on the bodywork. Take your time, do it right, and it will look like it came from the factory like that! Sorry to hear you crashed. Good luck with your "winter project"-
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Sorry to hear you crashed. Good luck with your "winter project"-
Thanks, really appreciate the great advice. I really wish I had frame sliders on, and I really should've installed them when I first bought the bike. All in all, I am very thankful for the crash. We're all bound to go down sometime. Mine was today.

I was going to install no cut sliders, but I'm gonna go with the "cut-frame" sliders now that you mention it. Hopefully this doesn't happen again,

I've ordered most of the parts, and holy crap are fairings expensive for a piece of plastic or what??
 

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Thanks, really appreciate the great advice. I really wish I had frame sliders on, and I really should've installed them when I first bought the bike. All in all, I am very thankful for the crash. We're all bound to go down sometime. Mine was today.

I was going to install no cut sliders, but I'm gonna go with the "cut-frame" sliders now that you mention it. Hopefully this doesn't happen again,

I've ordered most of the parts, and holy crap are fairings expensive for a piece of plastic or what??
I would keep your same bodywork, as it doesn't look to have structural damage? Maybe get a new decal, and some touch-up paint, and call it good.... Look around on eBay or this site used left side panel, and put it on when you go to sell it one day. If not, you can always use the current one as a "practice" panel for cutting the hole for the frame slider. It was REALLY hard for me to cut a hole in the side on my totally mint condition bodywork on my R6!!! Watch some Youtube videos on cutting the holes. Take your time, and you will be happy with the results-
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would keep your same bodywork, as it doesn't look to have structural damage? Maybe get a new decal, and some touch-up paint, and call it good.... Look around on eBay or this site used left side panel, and put it on when you go to sell it one day. If not, you can always use the current one as a "practice" panel for cutting the hole for the frame slider. It was REALLY hard for me to cut a hole in the side on my totally mint condition bodywork on my R6!!! Watch some Youtube videos on cutting the holes. Take your time, and you will be happy with the results-
I have determined the cause of the accident to be putting most of the bikes weight weight on the left foot peg. I took the turn too fast, and decided to keep leaning far beyond my ability and ended up ligfitng the rear end by putting most of the bikes weight on the peg. This is why the peg is deformed/twisted about the little "scrape peg" below the footrest, and the clutch pedal is damaged too.

And to start, side mirror, clutch pedal and connecting rod, footpeg, and crankcase cover are all permanently damaged. Will be replacing thise for now and install frame sliders asap.
 

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I’d suggest getting off the stock tires ASAP, they’re junk and rock hard so they don’t take heat well and are slippery as ****.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I’d suggest getting off the stock tires ASAP, they’re junk and rock hard so they don’t take heat well and are slippery as ****.
It seems the rear owner had a thing for burnouts, the rear tires are squared and down to the wear bars. Will be replacing them in the spring. I've heard many bad things about them too. I was thinking of getting the new Michelin Road 5's. How are those iyo?
 

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No experience. I had Dunlop alpha 13s in a 110/150 setup until I got a puncture and loved them. I currently have 120/160 Dunlop Q3s on my bike and while they’re okay, I’m looking to replace them with Bridgestone S21s or S22s ASAP.

I don’t like the 110/140 original setup. I preferred the 150 read for the track and I think it’s the ideal choice. I like my current 160s but they’re a bit hard to fully tip and engage the edge but are perfectly fine for city riding.

Anything you get will be a major improvement over the stock crap.
 

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Glad to hear it was only your pride (and minor bike damage) that was hurt. I dropped my bike a couple times - once on my driveway (slight scuff on mirror) and once at a light when I misjudged the turn I was waiting at and didn't put my foot down in time. Slightly bent the foot peg.


Both cases taught me to respect the weight of the bike more and to be more cautious. Fortunately, I was not hurt in either case.



Chalk this up as a teachable moment for yourself - remember that you want to be able to go home at the end of the ride and there are folks out there in their cars or other vehicles that want the same.



Ride safe!
 

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I've ordered most of the parts, and holy crap are fairings expensive for a piece of plastic or what??
Hence the saying "Buy and Cry."

I rode once with a group of Harley riders on my lowly Japanese Honda 900. When we stopped for coffee the subject came up if anyone has ever dropped their bike and I spit my coffee all over the table. After 50 years of dirt and street I said I could not remember how many times. The others all said "Well I never dropped my Harley." Yeah right.

So I asked how many miles do you guys ride in a year? Silence. My guess is once a month to the coffee shop and back so about 1000 miles a year. Hey whatever floats your boat. It's all good.
 
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