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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Haven't been posting for a while due to me replacing my clutch lever. Found it cheap online in Thailand for $8 total only draw back was the long wait process for shipping. After replacing my clutch lever I haven't been riding for a good three weeks to a month so I obviously was anxious to get back on the road. Even if those roads were slick after just raining and the streets not completely being dry I was obliged to get out there anyway. Not even five minutes passed by after making a left turn and the bike losing traction up under me. NEVER again will I be riding under such conditions , I knew I shouldn't have but did anyway. Bad road conditions plus lack of experience don't make a pleasant combination. Good thing is I'm injury free just a scrap on my leg. Wasn't traveling to fast and had on protection. Faring is scraped up , Shift lever is bent in and is now stuck in 6th gear.
 

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I don't get it, was it icy? That just looks like some wet parts on the road. Were you going too fast? Did you brake while turning? I don't understand how you would lose traction on some wet spots while taking a left. I mean, either you were at a stop and then you took left but how would you lose traction. So maybe it was green and you took the left too fast? Or you took the left without stopping, then you either broke with the front brakes while turning or you accelerated too hard and caused a jerk while turning?

Break down the game film!

I ride in the rain all the time, nothing to be afraid of in general. Ride like the road is wet. Guessing there was underlying newbie issue with bad technique that caused it and the rain just pointed out your mistake.

Anyway, sorry not trying to make you feel bad, just trying to let you recall all the details so you can learn from this and not make the same mistake. Sorry you had to drop your bike.
 

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That road looks like it has a lot of loose rocks/dirt and holes, which when wet would make slipping easier. Maybe he was turning and the tires lost contact over the wet rocks/dirt, and the tires bouncing over the holes would throw his steering?
 

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I don't get it, was it icy? That just looks like some wet parts on the road. Were you going too fast? Did you brake while turning? I don't understand how you would lose traction on some wet spots while taking a left. I mean, either you were at a stop and then you took left but how would you lose traction. So maybe it was green and you took the left too fast? Or you took the left without stopping, then you either broke with the front brakes while turning or you accelerated too hard and caused a jerk while turning?

Break down the game film!

I ride in the rain all the time, nothing to be afraid of in general. Ride like the road is wet. Guessing there was underlying newbie issue with bad technique that caused it and the rain just pointed out your mistake.

Anyway, sorry not trying to make you feel bad, just trying to let you recall all the details so you can learn from this and not make the same mistake. Sorry you had to drop your bike.
I also would like to know the extra details. I ride 365 rain or shine. Wondering why a little rain would cause a break in traction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't get it, was it icy? That just looks like some wet parts on the road. Were you going too fast? Did you brake while turning? I don't understand how you would lose traction on some wet spots while taking a left. I mean, either you were at a stop and then you took left but how would you lose traction. So maybe it was green and you took the left too fast? Or you took the left without stopping, then you either broke with the front brakes while turning or you accelerated too hard and caused a jerk while turning?

Break down the game film!

I ride in the rain all the time, nothing to be afraid of in general. Ride like the road is wet. Guessing there was underlying newbie issue with bad technique that caused it and the rain just pointed out your mistake.

Anyway, sorry not trying to make you feel bad, just trying to let you recall all the details so you can learn from this and not make the same mistake. Sorry you had to drop your bike.
No it wasn't icy ... not nearly cold enough being 70+ degrees out .... more so it was a combination of riding on a street in bad road conditions ( you can see in the photo ) in conjunction of the mixture of oil and water on the street. That street is currently under construction and they haven't reached down to that portion yet. You can clearly see the work-site above in the photo. Definitely don't feel bad , all I could do is take away a learning experience. Walked away pretty much unscathed so that's all that matters. Bike is nothing but a piece of motorized equipment that can be repaired or replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That road looks like it has a lot of loose rocks/dirt and holes, which when wet would make slipping easier. Maybe he was turning and the tires lost contact over the wet rocks/dirt, and the tires bouncing over the holes would throw his steering?
Intelligent insight , precisely what occurred.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
But as far as repairing anyone have any ideas. The bike has very minor damage , I was thinking maybe sand down the faring portion and use spray paint? As for the shift lever it looks like it could be taken off and straightened
 

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Bummer - good the damage was light and you're OK though - all fixable. The shift lever can be removed and straightened out pretty well with a hammer. The fairing looks like it could be sanded and hit with some color match paint and be passable -

Sometimes after a rain the road is slicker because stuff (sand, gravel) gets washed onto the pavement during the rain and not enough traffic has passed to push it back off yet. Cold tires and wet pavement can cause bad things to happen sometimes too.
 

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I take it was a low speed fall. Those are the best kinds because you don't really get hurt bad, but it definately makes you more aware of what can happen on a bike. Been there, done that. Glad you're OK. Now get busy and order some more parts so you can get back on the horse!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bummer - good the damage was light and you're OK though - all fixable. The shift lever can be removed and straightened out pretty well with a hammer. The fairing looks like it could be sanded and hit with some color match paint and be passable -

Sometimes after a rain the road is slicker because stuff (sand, gravel) gets washed onto the pavement during the rain and not enough traffic has passed to push it back off yet. Cold tires and wet pavement can cause bad things to happen sometimes too.
Thanks for your response. I'm into self repair , so the more things I learn to do the better. Removing and replacing the clutch lever was a breeze. I'm assuming the shift lever shouldn't differ any in degree of difficulty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I take it was a low speed fall. Those are the best kinds because you don't really get hurt bad, but it definately makes you more aware of what can happen on a bike. Been there, done that. Glad you're OK. Now get busy and order some more parts so you can get back on the horse!
Thanks but I don't really think I need to order anything. I don't care about it being in pristine condition to much. Going to see what kind of patching up I can do with the faring. The lever just needs to be straightened.
 

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Intelligent insight , precisely what occurred.
I talk by experience, not from now but from 20 years ago from riding my BMX on similar road conditions, and a similar situation. I tend to picture past scenarios into situation while I'm driving to help avoid them re-ocurring. I have many life experiences/scars to say, since I was a little daredevil haha. Even broke my chin split in two, and my top left ear lobe snapped in two also! But the stairs we're fine, no harm done
 

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If I recall, the pivot bolt holding the shift lever onto the rearset is Loctited, so make sure the hex is well-seated in the bolt so you don't strip the bolt head. The shift lever is steel, so you don't have to be overly gentle when you bend or beat it back into shape. Loctite on reassembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The new painted fairing with graphic decals for that side is around $80, just buy a new one and bend the shift lever back so you can shift gears again.
Thanks , It kinda happened at a good time anyway. I live in a state where bikes get winterized and there is maybe a good month of riding left. Well for me at least , I know some people say every day is a good day to ride. But I have no intent in riding in rain , snow or ice. Might just pack it up , but with global warming the past 5 to 10 years its been gradually staying warmer longer throughout the year. So....we shall see.
 

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Studded snow tires?:laugh:
The R3 isn't necessarily the bike I'd put those on ... R1 though ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OX_weIUwd_o


Seriously though - glad you're okay. And, everyone has her own risk tolerance, but if your decision is never to ride when there might be water on the road, your bike's going to be spending a lot of time in the garage. Sunny weather is when people water their lawns and wash their cars. Sunny weather when no one's letting water run across the road is when sand and gravel accumulate in the corners. Better to be aware of road conditions and work on your skills (including, but not limited to, knowing when to back off the throttle or decrease your lean angle). That's that "traction pie" we learn about in the MSF course. Sure it's cheezy, but it's a useful way to think about available traction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I talk by experience, not from now but from 20 years ago from riding my BMX on similar road conditions, and a similar situation. I tend to picture past scenarios into situation while I'm driving to help avoid them re-ocurring. I have many life experiences/scars to say, since I was a little daredevil haha. Even broke my chin split in two, and my top left ear lobe snapped in two also! But the stairs we're fine, no harm done
With age comes wisdom ... well hopefully.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If I recall, the pivot bolt holding the shift lever onto the rearset is Loctited, so make sure the hex is well-seated in the bolt so you don't strip the bolt head. The shift lever is steel, so you don't have to be overly gentle when you bend or beat it back into shape. Loctite on reassembly.
Thanks , will look into it over the weekend when I get some time. Gonna be raining all week throughout the weekend so happened at a good time interval if it had to happen.
 
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