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Hey all!,
Just wanted to introduce myself and make my first post. I just purchased my first motorcycle (yamaha r3 blue/silver obviously) over the weekend and it should be delivered Monday or Tuesday. I can't wait! Its my first bike and I haven't had much any experience riding motorcycles with the exception of riding my buddies dirt bike a few times. I hope to upgrade to its bigger brother (r6) or maybe a cbr600 in a year or so, so I was thinking about holding off on any upgrades. With the purchase of my bike I got a free motorcycle safety course but the first open slot is a few weeks out and don't expect my self restraint to last that long :D . I know this forum is filled with experienced riders and was hoping you guys may be able to shoot some tips my way for my first time starting up my new baby and taking her for a (very cautious) spin. Thanks everybody who takes the time to respond! Glad to be here!
 

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The MSF course is great for new riders. If you have the opportunity, some track-day organizations offer 'advanced rider training' courses - the best way to increase your skillset quickly, IMO. Invest in good protective gear (leathers, brain bucket).
 

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Check YouTube for some MSF videos there are some very useful ones which detail the actual requirements.

Question. Do you have an endorsement yet?
 

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The MSF course is great for new riders. If you have the opportunity, some track-day organizations offer 'advanced rider training' courses - the best way to increase your skillset quickly, IMO. Invest in good protective gear (leathers, brain bucket).
lol +1 for "brain bucket". havent heard that one before. gave me a good laugh :D
 

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Get some good gear...Dress for a fall off your Bike, not the ride, and look where you want to Go, new riders, and experienced ones as well, tend to "Target Fixate" and ride right into the guard rail.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the responses guys!

The MSF course is great for new riders. If you have the opportunity, some track-day organizations offer 'advanced rider training' courses - the best way to increase your skillset quickly, IMO. Invest in good protective gear (leathers, brain bucket).
I got myself a johnny rocket jacket with a bunch of armor some johnny rocket gloves and a Scorpion Exo-500 in terms of a helmet. I'm real amped to take the MSF course and the advanced rider training on the track sounds fricken awesome I'll definitely be looking into that.

Check YouTube for some MSF videos there are some very useful ones which detail the actual requirements.

Question. Do you have an endorsement yet?
I do have my permit but given that the MSF course was included in the purchase of my bike I was planning on simply getting my endorsement/license through the completion of the course
 

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Get some good gear...Dress for a fall off your Bike, not the ride, and look where you want to Go, new riders, and experienced ones as well, tend to "Target Fixate" and ride right into the guard rail.
Thanks for the tip! to clarify when you say "target fixate" does that mean they look at the guardrail and as a result thats the direction they inadvertently drive and as a result hit it? Would this apply to a car in front of me? would I WANT to fixate on the car in front of me in order to stay on the right path or is that more likely to lead me into hitting the car or other trouble?
 

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I'd suggest you go to a open, empty parking lot with no traffic and do simple drills like starting and stopping. Add turning around a few markers, soda can or something.

Work on getting braking smooth and as a reflex rather than having to think about what to do. Practice, practice, practice.

You don't need to leave first gear to start becoming a good rider.
 

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Thanks for the tip! to clarify when you say "target fixate" does that mean they look at the guardrail and as a result thats the direction they inadvertently drive and as a result hit it? Would this apply to a car in front of me? would I WANT to fixate on the car in front of me in order to stay on the right path or is that more likely to lead me into hitting the car or other trouble?

Sometimes, learning not to target fixate is difficult. You tend to focus on what the possible threat is, such as a guardrail during a curve, or an oncoming or close call car.

With the guardrail and curve scenario, the best is to look through and ahead of the curve, like you see many racers look ahead as they turn through their apex.

With the car, I tend to just think ahead, and play "what if" games in my head.

What if this ******* veers into my lane, what if this Numb-Nuts crosses the double yellow ?? :eek:

Always think of Escape routes when other cars are around you.
 

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Be patient and wait until you take the course to ride your new R3; you don't want to dump it due to inexperience--and you don't want to form bad habits that the course will have to iron out. Get Keith Code's video "A Twist of the Wrist II" and watch it several times, especially the parts dealing with "Survival Reactions" (SRs). Target fixation is explained in depth. And above all...don't be a Squid!
 

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+1 What Mike said. Take the MSF course. Gear up (ATGATT) and practice practice practice like in a parking lot. GL!
 

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The best way is to not focus on target fixation. Instead, LOOK where you want to go. If you catch yourself staring at one point too long, you are guilty of target fixation. There is a lot of use of peripheral vision in riding, but it is not something you will think about. Here is the example: As you roll through a turn, look ahead as far as you can. To be safe, you should never ride faster than you could safely react to a situation around the corner. This does not mean everything is avoidable, but you can prevent a lot by riding with this in mind. As your experience grows, so will your abilities. I know we see some crazy instances on the race track, but understanding fundamental and physics can go a long ways while riding. Focus is a very big key to riding. So hopefully you are not a distracted rider. You need to minimize distractions and focus on what you do and the things and people around you. If there is a car in front of you or to the side, understand the scenario that could happen, and be ready to react to it. This is something that just sits in your mind, but does not make you a nervous rider.

Take the school! Spend some time practice accelerating and stopping in the parking lot. I would say you do not need to worry about anything other than 1st and 2nd to begin. The other gears come easy.

I personally downshift before braking, because I like it that way, and I think it is an easier thing to manage. Buy gear, and I would recommend doing a trackday. It will make you a better street ridder.

Mike
 

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one tip i found pretty useful in my motorcycle rider had book is " a good motorcycle rider is always looking for trouble, not to get in but to avoid" those arent the exact words but it was something along those lines. while im riding im always scanning the road in front of me and up ahead like @JerseyR3 said always look for escape routes when cars are around and also while in a turn. which is why you want to look ahead or through a turn. they will teach you all of this in the msf course and go more in depth and it will all start to make sense once you get a first had experience
 
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