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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last night I got into my first sketchy situation as a new rider. It really made me realize how much I need to practice escape maneuvers, being one with the bike, and I was pretty lucky nothing serious happened.

It was around midnight and I was traveling down a 3 lane road (oncoming traffic on the far left and a shared turning lane in the middle) when I needed to take a left across the oncoming traffic. I saw a large delivery truck coming on the opposite side, so I positioned myself on the right side of the turning lane because I didn't want to get blasted by the wind coming off of it. All of a sudden the truck starts coming into the shared turning lane, full speed (40-50mph), and right at me. I knew my escape route was to just pull back into the right lane and continue down the road, but as I went to throttle out of danger I released my clutch too fast and stalled out. I was pretty much a sitting duck, I was 95% sure I was going to have to ditch my bike, but at the last moment he straightened out and passed me with about 6' to spare. Turns out there were a couple bicyclists dressed in all black and no lights that the truck was swerving to avoid...

If it was not for my lane positioning I'm almost positive I wouldn't be writing this post right now. But like I said before, it really made me realize how much practicing for these situations can really help you survive, and when riding how you should always have a few escape routes in mind.

End of story, and safe riding to you all.
 

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Just remember, nobody sees you in the traffic. Ever.
It does not matter if u`re using reflex vest, high beam or what not...
Nobody sees you. (except ticket happy police then ;))
Be aware of this fact, and you`ll be fine.
 

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Seriously consider an advanced rider course. They teach alot of good material for street riders. Also, grab the book "Total Control" and "Mastering the Ride". I am sure there are more out there but those two are the only ones I can comment on for street riding that I actually own. TOTW is more track oriented.

"Be aware of this fact, and you`ll be fine."

Not quite. That is dangerous advice. What happens when he hits an oil/sand/gravel patch? A deer or other large animal? Practice swerving, practice quick stops, and everything in between taught by any of the advanced rider schools, or at the very least, what ever information you can get from internet articles, books you can borrow, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I probably will take the advanced riders course in the spring when courses are available, but as of right now on top of the tips given at the MSF course I've been reading a lot of forum posts on situation awareness and just watching youtube clips on accident prevention. Thanks for the book suggestions Kojiro, I'll have look into those.

I primarily ride my bike at night on roads where there are few cars, so it gives me great opportunities to practice quick stops on a straight away or while in a turn (straighten and brake), and I have been practicing swerving at some moderate speeds with objects in the road with like man holes or legitimate concerns like potholes.
 

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Glad you're ok.
A great tip I heard when crossing unprotected intersections is to match the speed of the car near you (slow down or speed up), that way both you and the vehicle is crossing the intersection at the same time. This prevents people from turning left suddenly because cars are more visible for them. As Dr Totakt said, nobody sees you in traffic and drivers have a hard time estimating your speed from a distance.
 
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