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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone, I'm torn about when to do the first oil change. The manual has it listed as part of the 600 mile maintenance, but in the timing interval below it also says "Month 1". I interpret this as whichever comes first. I got the bike at the end of November, so I really only put about 50 miles on it before it got too cold. Now it's just sitting in the garage. Should I just wait until the light comes on or do you think it makes sense to do it when the new season starts?

Probably overthinking this, but it's my first motorcycle and I don't want to mess up the break-in period. Thanks for your thoughts!!
 

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I would think the only concern would be oil degradation over time, which shouldn't be an issue if you begin to rack up the miles in a few months time. Yamaha are probably just covering the themselves warranty wise and giving a set time frame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The oil degradation was also my initial thought for dismissing it. I found a few more articles though that say the first up to 200 miles is when the new engine components mate and you’ll have the most metallic shavings/debris. So from that angle changing earlier would make sense, especially if it’s just sitting for weeks/months with a few miles on it. I think I’ll change it one of these weekends for peace of mind and then again at 500 or whenever the light comes on based on mileage. In hindsight I probably should have done it before winterizing. If anyone is interested I’ll update with how the oil looked.
 

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Hi Everyone, I'm torn about when to do the first oil change. The manual has it listed as part of the 600 mile maintenance, but in the timing interval below it also says "Month 1". I interpret this as whichever comes first. I got the bike at the end of November, so I really only put about 50 miles on it before it got too cold. Now it's just sitting in the garage. Should I just wait until the light comes on or do you think it makes sense to do it when the new season starts?

Probably overthinking this, but it's my first motorcycle and I don't want to mess up the break-in period. Thanks for your thoughts!!

I did my fifth oil change at 600 miles, as part of a precise and fairly intense break-in (which I have used on every new engine I have owned -- after the first one, anyway) designed to produce the best possible long-term engine durability (it can also reduce post-break-in oil consumption and slightly improve post-break-in power). I generally only go by mileage for oil changes. I don't think time should be an issue unless your bike is sitting around unused for VERY long periods (as in several years). Clearly, I'm a big proponent of the early-and-often philosophy, which should help you get the most out of any new motor, but I would tie that more to engine run-time, as that is what breaks down oil via friction/heat/shearing. I intend to keep my R3 for many, many years and am looking to get 100,000 miles out of it without an engine rebuild.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks! So by mileage, how did you pull off 5 by 600? I read some people go as early as 20. And if you recall, what did the oil look like? At this point I’m actually curious, I might even do the whole magnet thing to see if I see anything.
 

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Thanks! So by mileage, how did you pull off 5 by 600? I read some people go as early as 20. And if you recall, what did the oil look like? At this point I’m actually curious, I might even do the whole magnet thing to see if I see anything.
No problem. On new motors, I change the oil and filter at 0 (after letting the bike idle on the side stand for about 3 minutes), 25, 100, 250, 600, and 1,000 miles -- normal intervals thereafter (typically "by the book" for street bikes and every 1,000 miles for dual sports). There is typically at least some small amount of minute metal particles but not a cause for concern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No problem. On new motors, I change the oil and filter at 0 (after letting the bike idle on the side stand for about 3 minutes), 25, 100, 250, 600, and 1,000 miles -- normal intervals thereafter (typically "by the book" for street bikes and every 1,000 miles for dual sports). There is typically at least some small amount of minute metal particles but not a cause for concern.
Thanks, I’ll keep this in mind for when I take a look at how my oil looks. I know this is a different can of worms, but since you do a lot of oil changes, are you just using conventional? I was thinking synthetic as soon as possible, but with this kind of frequency (even after the break-in) and the manual not calling for it I’m leaning towards conventional, maybe part synthetic.
 

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Thanks, I’ll keep this in mind for when I take a look at how my oil looks. I know this is a different can of worms, but since you do a lot of oil changes, are you just using conventional? I was thinking synthetic as soon as possible, but with this kind of frequency (even after the break-in) and the manual not calling for it I’m leaning towards conventional, maybe part synthetic.
I have mostly always stuck with conventional -- Honda 10W40SJ. As long as you change it on time, I don't think it really matters. What I will say is that if you do switch to synthetic, a) make sure it is motorcycle specific and b) conventional knowledge (no pun intended) suggests that you should wait until at least 1,500 miles if you do switch over.
 

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Change it at 600 miles and put whatever 10w40 motorcycle oil you want in. It's an understrung 300 so you don't need to overthink changing the oil.
 

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It's 600 miles or 1 month, whichever comes first. If it's a new bike, it's most likely has conventional oil in it, which will coke (a type of oil breakdown) over time. Full synthetic won't (or at least very little) over time, which is one of the primary advantages of synthetic oil. So for the first service on a new bike, it's still 600 miles or 1 month, whichever comes first.
 

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1 month is barely any time. Do it at 600 yourself. The 1 month thing is to get you back to the dealer for $$$ service, imho.
 

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Yeah, do it at 600 miles and by God don't go to the dealer! Where I live they charge $500+ for this. Learn to change the oil yourself. Get the Yamaha filter, get a new copper washer of the correct size, and you'll have to get an oil recycling container and recycle the oil. It's simple but it will give your confidence. Or else take it to a private shop. By the way, now's a good time to change to synthetic and get better shifting.
 

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I'm really struggling to see the reasoning behind this? It sounds like a big waste of time and a kick in the guts to the environment.
Also don't they have break-in oil when you first buy it? So you should definitely put a decent amount of mileage on it before you change it.

And if you're worried about quality of oil between changes just do an oil analysis.
 

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It’s not a waste of time. New parts in an engine, especially in the transmission, shed some metal as they work against each other. They’re designed to. You want to get those metallic particles out of your engine and the engine oil. Recycling the oil and filter actually helps the environment. The oil will be re-refined and used again.
Also don't they have break-in oil when you first buy it? So you should definitely put a decent amount of mileage on it before you change it.

And if you're worried about quality of oil between changes just do an oil analysis.
No, there’s no break-in oil as such. It’s just the oil the factory’s engineers have designed the engine to use. And I t’s to be changed at 600 miles because the Japanese engineers calculate in kilometers. 1000 km equals approximately 600 miles. By the way, for Japan’s Big Four, America is their test market. They’re well aware that the typical American motorcyclist does no maintenance at all. I’ve heard of new riders from my mechanic who weren’t even aware you had to change the oil periodically. Someone brought a new bike in that wasn’t running. He’d never changed the oil and there was none in the engine. So the Japanese figure that if their bikes can survive in America, they can survive anywhere. Think of that the next time you see a 600 sport bike that revs to 16,000 rpm—and the manufacturer puts a warranty on it.
 

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It’s not a waste of time. New parts in an engine, especially in the transmission, shed some metal as they work against each other. They’re designed to. You want to get those metallic particles out of your engine and the engine oil. Recycling the oil and filter actually helps the environment. The oil will be re-refined and used again.

No, there’s no break-in oil as such. It’s just the oil the factory’s engineers have designed the engine to use. And I t’s to be changed at 600 miles because the Japanese engineers calculate in kilometers. 1000 km equals approximately 600 miles. By the way, for Japan’s Big Four, America is their test market. They’re well aware that the typical American motorcyclist does no maintenance at all. I’ve heard of new riders from my mechanic who weren’t even aware you had to change the oil periodically. Someone brought a new bike in that wasn’t running. He’d never changed the oil and there was none in the engine. So the Japanese figure that if their bikes can survive in America, they can survive anywhere. Think of that the next time you see a 600 sport bike that revs to 16,000 rpm—and the manufacturer puts a warranty on it.
Break-in oil do exist...




5 oil changes before you even hit 600 miles is definitely a waste of time.
 

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Maybe I'm jaded, but I've learned not to trust labels, lol. That's probably just regular 10W-40 non-synthetic oil, but more $$ because the label says break-in ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks! I’m comfortable doing the oil change by myself. A local dealer said if I do the oil change the actual inspection/maintenance should run between $100 and $150. Sounds like a standard rate for about an hour worth of labor for an OEM shop. I was going to get this done just to make sure everything’s tightened and the way it’s supposed to be. Based on the comments it sounds like I could safely skip unless I notice something that doesn’t feel right?
 
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