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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an opportunity to add a never-dropped <900K 2014 CBR1000RR to the stable at a very reasonable price, so I thought I would ask the guy who owns one some questions ;).

1. How does your insurance premium on the CBR compare to the R3?
2. How happy is the CBR in 25-35 mph traffic compared to the R3?
3. Do your find the CBR any more resistant to crosswinds?
4. Any significant issues with low-speed maneuverability?

And of course, any other comparisons off the top of your helmet would be most appreciated. I have seat time on an R1 and S1000RR -- found the R1 too racy for me and S1K running hot in traffic. On paper the CBR looks like my just-right kind of liter bike porridge.

Thanks!
 

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Whoa, did I read that right?

I'm sure it's a typo but 900k is alot of miles. Even if it is less than. ;)


Randy
 

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I have an opportunity to add a never-dropped <900K 2014 CBR1000RR to the stable at a very reasonable price, so I thought I would ask the guy who owns one some questions ;).

1. How does your insurance premium on the CBR compare to the R3?
2. How happy is the CBR in 25-35 mph traffic compared to the R3?
3. Do your find the CBR any more resistant to crosswinds?
4. Any significant issues with low-speed maneuverability?

And of course, any other comparisons off the top of your helmet would be most appreciated. I have seat time on an R1 and S1000RR -- found the R1 too racy for me and S1K running hot in traffic. On paper the CBR looks like my just-right kind of liter bike porridge.

Thanks!
As someone with an S1K pirate edition (arrrrrr!),

1. Hilarious, the number will make you laugh as a coping mechanism, but I live in CA where I'm going to get bent over regardless.
2. First gear does not like being under 10mph, 9mph and slower is below idle so I have to feather the clutch during anything low speed.
3. Barely, had a nice 40mph+ crosswind in the valley come up from LA and the lean angle sensor indicated >=25 degree lean just to keep the bike in a straight line.
4. Turn radius is noticeably poorer than the R3 while moving it around the garage / drive way. Never notice it on the move unless I'm doing slow speed lane changes between cars nearly perpendicularly to them.

As far as heat goes, if you're going freeway speeds you'll never really notice it. Around town in 90 degree weather, it's warm, but I'm not being cooked alive. I don't really touch the frame with my thighs.
 

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As the guys on the S1k forums would say, you should be riding in leathers anyways! (I don't)

FWIW, if I were to get any other bike the CBR600 or CBR1000 would be the other option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As someone with an S1K pirate edition (arrrrrr!),

1. Hilarious, the number will make you laugh as a coping mechanism, but I live in CA where I'm going to get bent over regardless.
I think I'll spitball three classes of bike to State Farm this time around, just so I can see the breadth of that hilarity. Rates are not bad in Ohio, but I anticipate this going 3x the rate of the R3.

The crosswind thing is eye opening with this weight of faired bike. The first time I went over a bridge on a 20 mph was very busy ... and only later did I find my front tire was low (checking the back tire as an indicator for air loss rate in the front and back is a poor strategy, he said). Now that I'm micromanaging both tires things are pretty stable, but I'm still busy-on-guard in high winds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
xorbe: What 600 did you own? (I admit to eyeing the CBR600RR as well. No real good deals compared to this 1000 so far).
 

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I have an opportunity to add a never-dropped <900mi 2014 CBR1000RR to the stable at a very reasonable price, so I thought I would ask the guy who owns one some questions:
1. How does your insurance premium on the CBR compare to the R3?
2. How happy is the CBR in 25-35 mph traffic compared to the R3?
3. Do you find the CBR any more resistant to crosswinds?
4. Any significant issues with low-speed maneuverability?
And of course, any other comparisons off the top of your helmet would be most appreciated. I have seat time on an R1 and S1000RR -- found the R1 too racy for me and S1K running hot in traffic. On paper the CBR looks like my just-right kind of liter bike porridge.
You know I am going to tell you to get it! :D
1. You will have to check around and see if you can find a rate that you can live with. Lots of riders recommend STATE FARM.
2. The CBR is just fine in slower traffic because it has EXCELLENT fueling off-idle.
3. The CBR thinks it's a fighter jet. Crosswinds?!?!? Hahahaha! Funny.
4. Low-speed maneuverability is up to YOU. It's a longer wheelbase, it's slightly heavier. Literbikes have a shorter front wheel turn-radius lock-to-lock, than a bike like the R3. You are also leaning forward more. I can turn tighter on the R3, than I can on the CBR. But that is to be expected. The CBR is designed to be stable at 150mph, and it is! The R3 is designed to be easy to ride for new riders. And it is. You don't buy a literbike to negotiate parking lots down at your local mall. That is what the R3 is for! :laugh:

The CBR1000RR is probably the best literbike for street riding. It's certainly the best value in the class. People say the BMW s1000rr is great on the street too, but compare the price difference. It's significant.
The CBR does a great job of trying to keep the heat off you at stoplights. But don't expect it to be like the R3. Much bigger engine between your legs!
The CBR has great midrange torque, which is where you want the power for street riding. It has smooth fueling, and handles like a dream. It feels like a 600 once you get rolling. If you get it, I don't think you would regret it. You will love the engine. And they look amazing. CBR is also reliable, and parts/accessories are readily available everywhere.

If you get it, the gearing is tall. Really tall. Do a -1 front sprocket, or at least a +2 in the rear. It really improves the overall performance. Don't mess with the exhaust. It will cost you lots of money, for minimal gains. Just remove the exhaust flapper-valve cable at the servo pulley, and you`re good to go!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
CBRpilot: Thanks very much! I suspected you would be a stellar enabler/inciter. I do take issue with your assigning my R3 mall duty. Not even our cars go to those places ;)

This is probably the last liter without rider aids, which is probably just as well for me. I dislike "modes" and would prefer to always be slightly terrified of being anything but zoned-in while riding. Most reviews indicate this motor is fairly docile until you twist it, and that will be necessary most of the places I ride. Reliability is also a big factor in looking at the CBR. Way too many things seem to be leaking and "getting thrown" on the Eurobikes.

I hope to go ride this tomorrow afternoon when the Midwest thinks it's April again. (1/2" of snow this morning. :()
 

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This is probably the last liter without rider aids, which is probably just as well for me. I dislike "modes" and would prefer to always be slightly terrified of being anything but zoned-in while riding.


I don't think I've heard anyone call the cbr1000 terrifying, although "boring" has been used to describe it on more than one occasion
 

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You can always turn all of the nannies off on any modern bike. I still don't understand the mentality of "I don't want that, it ruins the rider experience." Ok, but in the case of half of the Japanese right now, they're 2009 technology for 2015-2016 prices.

But, I <3 my heated grips and cruise control. Clearly I belong in a car or something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You can always turn all of the nannies off on any modern bike. I still don't understand the mentality of "I don't want that, it ruins the rider experience." Ok, but in the case of half of the Japanese right now, they're 2009 technology for 2015-2016 prices.

But, I <3 my heated grips and cruise control. Clearly I belong in a car or something?
For me it's not ruining the riding experience necessarily. I'm just not a big fan having to turn modes on and off or wondering what synthetic performance envelope a vehicle is operating in. This drives me nuts in cars, and it's only going to get worse there. Bikes are pretty analogue for me, and I'd say since older 0-mile CBR1000RRs are going in the $10k range that's a pretty good deal for 2009 tech.
 

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What types of wind are you guys referencing? Every single faired bike I have owned has had problems in CROSSWINDS. The fairings act as a sail. On the Coronado bridge, crosswinds blow me around, dangerously so on the R3 since it's so light. I mean to the point where you end up in the next lane. Yes I've experienced leaning the bike/hanging off just to try and stay in a straight line lol. I nakedized one of my N650s once and that did far better in crosswinds, but then sucked against head on wind since it had no windshield. If you are saying the 1000 is better in crosswinds, I am going to bet it's because it's heavier rather than the fairings are somehow sideways aerodynamic.
 

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If you are saying the 1000 is better in crosswinds, I am going to bet it's because it's heavier rather than the fairings are somehow sideways aerodynamic.
Yeah, my CBR cuts through the wind about as clean as can be expected.
No doubt, because it's a bit heavier, it has a LOW center-of-gravity, and the fairings help create a bubble around the bike at speed. It has a really nice HESD unit, that helps it feel stable and planted on the freeway.

The R3 is light, and it acts like a "sail" in crosswinds. My CBR is not like that.
 

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You can always turn all of the nannies off on any modern bike. I still don't understand the mentality of "I don't want that, it ruins the rider experience." Ok, but in the case of half of the Japanese right now, they're 2009 technology for 2015-2016 prices.
"Turning OFF" the electronics is not the point. Of course you can do that.
The point is: some people don't want to have to PAY EXTRA money for features they don't want.

A new Honda CBR1000RR is not "2009 technology" for 2016 prices.
The CBR was updated in 2012, and you can get a new CBR1kRR for much cheaper than you will pay for a new ZX10R, or R1. Even the aging GSXR1k is more expensive than a CBR. Back in 2013, I paid $11k for my CBR. I can't touch a new literbike for that price now. The new R1 is $17k!
 

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The 2012 update for the CBR was cosmetics. None of the underlying frame or electronics or engine were really changed.

A brand new 2016 CBR1000RR is $14K per Honda.
A brand new 2016 ZX10R w/ abs is $16.2K per Kawi.

I don't get buying a bike that is 2008 in 2016 with Bosch IMUs available in all but 1 of its competitors. But it's your bike, not mine, so go with what stirs your soul.

2009
On September 5, 2008, Honda announced the tenth generation of the RR as a 2009 model. The bike remained much the same, in terms of engine, styling, and performance. The only significant addition was the introduction of the optional factory fitted Combined ABS (C-ABS) system originally showcased on the CBR600RR Combined ABS prototype. New, lightweight turn signals were also added.

2010
2010 CBR1000RR at the 2009 Seattle International Motorcycle Show.
On September 4, 2009, Honda announced the eleventh generation of the RR as a 2010 model. Honda increased the diameter of the flywheel for more inertia. This improved low-rpm torque and smoother running just off idle. The license plate assembly was redesigned for quicker removal when preparing the motorcycle for track use. The muffler cover was also redesigned for improved appearance.

2012
The twelfth-generation Fireblade celebrated its 20th anniversary, revised for 2012, featuring Showa's Big Piston suspension technology, further improved software for the combined-ABS System, new 12-spoke wheels, aerodynamic tweaks, an all LCD display and other minor updates.[4]

2014
Retuned engine for additional power, modified rider position along with new windscreen. Also added a performance oriented "SP" variant.
 
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