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Hi there!

New rider here & just picked up a 2017 R3! I was hoping for recommendations on frame sliders? Cut or no cut is fine .. or just any insight would be great too! Thank you!
 

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My best advise is to get the Woodcraft "cut" frame sliders. Woodcraft only makes excellent, well thought out products that work! I would advise against any kind of "no-cut" sliders. They tend to have brackets that bend, and render the slider nearly useless, in some cases doing more damage than having no slider at all. Hope that helps you out, good luck-
 

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T-Rex No Cut Frame Sliders.
I had low sided and this saved me a lot of trouble on further damage. Very easy to install, also recommend T-Rex Engine Case Cover and Bar Ends.
Nice. Mind sharing what brand rear inner fender you have on there, and where it came from?
 

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A pic of them on the left side of my 2018 R3. (keep in mind partly b/c it's no cut, the location where they stick out of the bike on the left and right side are slightly different b/c of different mounting points)
67593
 

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No disrespect intended...... A slider that long will work fine for a tip-over in a parking lot, but will fail with any amount of forward speed. The mounting bolt will most likely bend first (best case scenario). Something that long, attached directly to the frame acts like a big "lever bar" and can sometimes bend the frame slightly in a crash. The shorter ones such as Woodcraft, or the TST equivalent, are less likely to bend (but still can). I view "frame sliders" as an investment protecting the FRAME in a crash..... Too many people view them a s "bodywork protectors"- which they aren't.... I also use "case sliders" to protect my motor in a crash. If I crash, or even tip-over in a parking lot, I expect the bodywork to get dinged/scratched... Just my two cents worth. My wife and I are both track riders. Unfortunately, I know what happens in a sliding crash-
 

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No disrespect intended...... A slider that long will work fine for a tip-over in a parking lot, but will fail with any amount of forward speed. The mounting bolt will most likely bend first (best case scenario). Something that long, attached directly to the frame acts like a big "lever bar" and can sometimes bend the frame slightly in a crash. The shorter ones such as Woodcraft, or the TST equivalent, are less likely to bend (but still can). I view "frame sliders" as an investment protecting the FRAME in a crash..... Too many people view them a s "bodywork protectors"- which they aren't.... I also use "case sliders" to protect my motor in a crash. If I crash, or even tip-over in a parking lot, I expect the bodywork to get dinged/scratched... Just my two cents worth. My wife and I are both track riders. Unfortunately, I know what happens in a sliding crash-
For sure. I read quite a few reviews and pros/cons of long vs short sliders. Ultimately I'm using the bike as a commuter on city streets and so my biggest chance of using the sliders is going to be trying to park on a weird hill or stepping into some oil on top of crosswalk paint, so I went with more bodywork protection than anything else.
 

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Once again, all due respect.... You would be surprised at the "leverage" a frame slider provides to the the frame. My wife went down on a CBR250R at maybe 30mph (on track). Her frame slider managed to create enough leverage to bend her frame slightly. While it wasn't catastrophic, it did bend the frame slightly. I had to "tweak" her front forks slightly to get it to track straight again. The purpose of a frame slider is to keep the frame of the bike from contacting the pavement in a crash. The shorter they are, the better the frame is protected. Bodywork is MUCH cheaper to replace than a frame-
 
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