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soo after finally seing sense i've decided i'm going to start on r3 instead of jumping in the deep end with an r6 , how long have you guys/girls had the r3 for before upgrading to a 600? bearing in mind i havent ridden a motorcycle before this so im looking at keeping the r3 for about 5/6months before moving onto the r6.. maybe thats to soon?
 

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I have had my R3 for over a year now. I don't plan on selling it to upgrade. I have ridden bikes ranging from a Ninja 250 to a Daytona 675. With my most recent before the R3 a Street Triple R. In my opinion setting some timeline for upgrading to a 600cc bike is not the wisest move. Also having ridden ~600 class bikes I really don't see the point on the street. The R3 is more fun to ride than the 600s because you can actually wring its neck. A couple seconds on the 600 and you are exceeding the speed limit and asking for trouble. Not to mention the 600s are more expensive to buy, insure, maintain and ride. I get the peer pressure to upgrade to a bigger "manlier" bike. I've been there and regretted it pretty quickly.
 

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Pretty ambitious bud. Never rode a motorcycle before, and already bypassing the R3. Been riding my R3 for about 1 1/2 years, and have no intention of fighting the heavier R6. Raven weighs about 321 lbs soaking wet. I like light bikes.
 

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You'll eventually realize that there's no place for a 600cc & litre racing bikes on the street, unless you ride for track days or (illegal) straight-line acceleration (speeding tickets or jail time, your choice). If you're +150lbs rider, look into suspension upgrades for the R3.

Okay that's not the whole truth - there are some uses for quick racing bikes on the street; in the upper rev range for highway riding - you could benefit from quick acceleration. Most circumstances however, don't require it.

And don't get carried away with modifying the R3; it's a great bike in stock form, and you may not be able to get a return on those spicy upgrades once you do sell it.

I'm a buzzkill. I try to balance that heavy burden to modify **** that isn't actually necessary, with a voice of reason and budget-oriented thinking. There's more value in tools than mods, but dammit, an aRacer ECU seems pretty convincing! I weigh the pros and cons in my mind over long periods of time while I'm saving up for parts - if it feels right in three months, I go for it. I feel that pulling the trigger on these things shouldn't be an impulsive decision.

The Yamaha R3 is all you'll ever need as far as displacement goes (321cc). Eventually you might want to try out another type of motorcycle (I was thinking of the Versys 300-X or the Tracer 700).

Don't sell before you have a solid 200 hours on the R3. Focus on riding practice and technique, rather than upgrades.

Also, refer to this post.
 

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I have a 1300CC sports bike but I LOVE riding the R3. I'm 6'3 245lbs so I look like a giant on it I'm sure but I couldn't care less. Its a blast! I don't think you will get bored of it as it loves to rev. The 1300CC is a monster but heavy and a lot to handle. The R3 feels flickable in the corners and honestly just a lot of fun to ride. DO NOT get the R6 as a first bike. The bigger CC bikes are not forgiving for new riders when you hit bumps etc and your wrist does an unpredictable twist.
 

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I've had well over a dozen bikes, including litre bikes. I currently have a Street Triple and I'm on my second R3.

I urge you to get an R3 before the R6. The simple fact is that if you go straight to the R6 you'll be missing out on something special.

Not only is it better to learn on a smaller bike (which will help your overall development), but, it's also so much fun being able to ride a bike close to its limits — unless you're on a track, it's impossible to ride an R6 anywhere near it's limits, both in terms of handling and performance. My Street Triple does more than the legal limit in first gear. Although it is the far superior bike, there's plenty of times where the R3 is even more fun to ride. It's so much fun going up and down through the gears on a tight and twisty road.

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

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I've had well over a dozen bikes, including litre bikes. I currently have a Street Triple and I'm on my second R3.

I urge you to get an R3 before the R6. The simple fact is that if you go straight to the R6 you'll be missing out on something special.

Not only is it better to learn on a smaller bike (which will help your overall development). But, it's also so much fun being able to ride a bike close to it's limits - unless you're on a track, it's impossible to ride an R6 anywhere near it's limits, both in terms of handling and performance. My Street Triple does more than the legal limit in first gear. Although it is the far superior bike, there's plenty of times where the R3 is even more fun to ride. It's so much fun going up and down through the gears on a tight and twisty road.

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This. I had my Street Triple R as the bike prior to the R3. It was a blast to ride, but only for a few seconds then you had to back off before you were in bike impounded territory. That first gear was insanely long. I went down to the R3 specifically because you can go "all out" on it for some time before you are in any real trouble. For me that is the fun.
 

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I just had my first day of motorcycling with my first bike (R3). It is crazy fun!
Doing figure 8's in a parking lot was the most fun part!
It is plenty quick around town. 5.5 sec 0-60 mph.
Freeway was a little daunting. I tucked as low as possible but the wind was still strong.
If Yamaha decides to make R3 399cc, will it still be called R3 or will they change the name to R4?
The bike is so affordable and insurance costs only $350/yr, so I may just add an R4 to the stable if it comes out, instead of selling the R3.
 

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...The bike is so affordable and insurance costs only $350/yr, so I may just add an R4 to the stable if it comes out, instead of selling the R3.
Be sure you're paying for under-insured and/or uninsured motorist coverage.

Let's be real for a moment here: Riding a bike is dangerous (that's something we all know so well). Because of this fact, it's more likely (than if we were in a car) that we may be hit by someone who isn't insured or is underinsured.

In the chance you do get hit by someone that is under-insured (or isn't insured at all), and they don't have the money to pay for damages if an accident was ruled in your favor (not your fault), then your insurance company will pay the difference. You don't want to experience the cost of repairing your body without insurance money to cover it!

Also, health insurance may or may not cover motorcycle accidents! Be sure you know these things before riding. Your life literally depends on you having your papers in order before you ride.

Someone had to be the buzzkill and mention the hard truth about riding & insurance. I accept.
 

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Be sure you're paying for under-insured and/or uninsured motorist coverage.

Let's be real for a moment here: Riding a bike is dangerous (that's something we all know so well). Because of this fact, it's more likely (than if we were in a car) that we may be hit by someone who isn't insured or is underinsured.

In the chance you do get hit by someone that is under-insured (or isn't insured at all), and they don't have the money to pay for damages if an accident was ruled in your favor (not your fault), then your insurance company will pay the difference. You don't want to experience the cost of repairing your body without insurance money to cover it!

Also, health insurance may or may not cover motorcycle accidents! Be sure you know these things before riding. Your life literally depends on you having your papers in order before you ride.

Someone had to be the buzzkill and mention the hard truth about riding & insurance. I accept.
An umbrella also is a good thing to have if you have a family. I have a $1M umbrella that extends my UM/UIM coverage.
 
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