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Discussion Starter #1
Your new bike is out in the garage gleaming like a freshly minted penny, and you’re in the house leafing through the owner’s manual for a detailed break-in procedure. But all you find is something like, “Take it easy for the first 500 miles or so.” That’s about as useful as telling a rookie pilot, “Keep it in the air.” It’s sound advice, but sadly short on specifics. Your buddies’ suggestions range from an arcane ritual of rpm limits, mystery oils, and incantations at one extreme to “Ride it like you stole it” at the other. Again, not much help. And yet the way you break in your bike can determine whether it’s a runner or a smoker later on.

Don’t panic. Most of the break-in on a new engine is done before it’s finished being assembled at the factory. Thanks to modern manufacturing techniques and metallurgy, gears and bearings are made to such close tolerances, and from such good materials, that it takes practically no time at all for them to break in. Cylinder honing is much more precise than it once was, too, so the pistons and bores get acquainted right from the get-go. The piston rings need some time to form a good seal with the bore, however, and that’s where you make the difference.

First, go to the page in the owner’s manual that lists recommended shift points in terms of vehicle speed. Now tear out that page and throw it away. Many manuals recommend ridiculously low shift points. If you constantly shift into second gear at 15 mph, for example, start saving up for a bottom-end overhaul; low rpm plus the resulting low oil pressure equals high bearing load. Use the tach for shift points, not the speedo, and don’t shy away from the upper two-thirds of the rpm range. It’s okay to run your new engine hard as long as you don’t overheat it. Let it cool down between bursts of throttle. Cycling cylinder heat and combustion-chamber pressure seats the rings and keeps your engine from burning oil later in life.

Don’t switch to synthetic oil until the rings have had a chance to create a good seal––a few thousand miles should be enough. (It’s worth asking your dealer if your bike came with synthetic in the first place.) When you make the switch, change both the oil and the filter, and do it while the engine is hot so you get as much of the old oil out as possible. Don’t worry about the small amount of petroleum oil left in the engine. It’ll mix with the synthetic and cycle out eventually with future oil changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Recommended shift points for the 2015 R3 from page 6-3 of the owner's manual: (1st to 2nd -12 mph, 2nd to 3rd-19 mph, 3rd to 4th-25 mph, 4th to 5th-31 mph, 5th to 6th-37 mph).

Recommended shift points for the 2013 V Star 1300 Deluxe from page 6-3 of the owner's manual: (1st to 2nd -12 mph, 2nd to 3rd-19 mph, 3rd to 4th-25 mph, 4th to 5th-31 mph).
In 5th gear on my 1300 at 31 mph, I'm lugging the **** out of the engine!

Recommended shift points for the 2014 R6 from page 6-3 of the owner's manual: (1st to 2nd -12 mph, 2nd to 3rd-19 mph, 3rd to 4th-25 mph, 4th to 5th-31 mph, 5th to 6th-37 mph).

Three TOTALLY different styles of motorcycles (sport, cruiser, super sport) with three totally different types of engines with the EXACT same mph shift points.
Did Yamaha's engineers write this or did Yamaha's lawyers?
 

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"First, go to the page in the owner’s manual that lists recommended shift points in terms of vehicle speed. Now tear out that page and throw it away." gave me a good laugh hahaha. useful information.
 

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Your bike was assembled, rolled to a dyno and wrung out thru every gear before being boxed up and shipped here. Go ride it!
 

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I'd never heard "a few thousand miles" before changing to full synthetic. I switched over to full synthetic at my 600 mi srvc. Hope I din't shorten the life of my motor...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'd never heard "a few thousand miles" before changing to full synthetic. I switched over to full synthetic at my 600 mi srvc. Hope I din't shorten the life of my motor...
I don't think you have anything to worry about.
Ride that sucker!
 

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I'd never heard "a few thousand miles" before changing to full synthetic. I switched over to full synthetic at my 600 mi srvc. Hope I din't shorten the life of my motor...
No way. Many new bikes come with full synthetic....Triumph Street Triple R, RSV-4, Tuono...actually almost everything Piaggio sells even the Vespa. All those bikes seem to get broken in. Same with new cars. My Prius and Civic both came with full synthetic.
 
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