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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


I think the rear sprocket guard looks horrendous. Has anyone removed it? Curious to if you have any photos?

Also will the chain guard stop the chain whipping up and getting your leg if it broke? (I wear full leathers so nothing would ever get caught in the chain). And as it's made of plastic I have little faith in it. Would love to hear opinions, stories etc!
 

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The sprocket guard is supposed to stop the chain from jamming if it comes off the sprocket.
 

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Yes I removed all that stuff off mine. Both the chain and the sprocket guards.
 
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Can you post photos?


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Bike's in the trailer now. Just imagine it without them...pretty simple :) Or look at other bikes that don't have the sprocket cover. The R3 is the only bike I've ever seen that contraption on. Never seen a bike with a rear sprocket guard before.
 

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This is all I could find from my build...a bit dark on that side. Best I got for the left side.
 

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I removed mine straight away (0 miles), as you can see I also removed the chain guard at the same time. It'd be very unusual for a broken chain to hit you in the leg (even without the chain guard) and it would be highly unlikely the chain will snap if you do proper chain maintenance and inspection
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

I removed mine straight away (0 miles), as you can see I also removed the chain guard at the same time. It'd be very unusual for a broken chain to hit you in the leg (even without the chain guard) and it would be highly unlikely the chain will snap if you do proper chain maintenance and inspection

Sweet!:)

What the **** happened to that spool! Ahahah, bit of a slide?
 

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A couple of weeks ago, I questioned a guy at the track who races his R3 asking whether he considered removing the guard from the rear sprocket. He said that he was going to do it and then the chain did in fact jump off the sprocket during a race. He believes that the guard prevented the chain from locking up his rear wheel and saved him from what could have been a very bad situation. So, he decided to keep it on. I am now wondering whether the R3 may be particularly prone to having the chain jump off.
 

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Yeah, the bike went sliding down the road with less than a mile on the odometer then again a few hours later
That's gotta be a record of some sort! lol At least I got a few practice sessions in before I through it down the track lol
 

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A couple of weeks ago, I questioned a guy at the track who races his R3 asking whether he considered removing the guard from the rear sprocket. He said that he was going to do it and then the chain did in fact jump off the sprocket during a race. He believes that the guard prevented the chain from locking up his rear wheel and saved him from what could have been a very bad situation. So, he decided to keep it on. I am now wondering whether the R3 may be particularly prone to having the chain jump off.
There is no such thing as "prone to have the chain pop off". There is only one way that can happen, and it doesn't matter what bike you have...chain being too loose. I'm sure in that case the guard helped, but what helps even more is to make sure your chain tension is right and then you don't have to worry about it. I have only heard of one case where someone's chain simply fell off, and it was actually a racer on this forum, but he acknowledged that the tension was off. Now, chains breaking...that's a different story. That happens a lot more, and that guard would not help in that case. Usually when a chain breaks it whips around so fast that it's likely to put a hole in the engine case.
 

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There is no such thing as "prone to have the chain pop off". There is only one way that can happen, and it doesn't matter what bike you have...chain being too loose. I'm sure in that case the guard helped, but what helps even more is to make sure your chain tension is right and then you don't have to worry about it. I have only heard of one case where someone's chain simply fell off, and it was actually a racer on this forum, but he acknowledged that the tension was off. Now, chains breaking...that's a different story. That happens a lot more, and that guard would not help in that case. Usually when a chain breaks it whips around so fast that it's likely to put a hole in the engine case.
That'd be me...it was loose before the session. If chain snaps, its got enough momentum to go through engine cases, boots, leathers etc.
 

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SBK1198, most racers and many track junkies have gone with the 415 conversion in order to reduce rotating mass and that was indeed the case regarding the bike I was referencing. Because the 415 chain is significantly thinner than the 520 chain, it has to be less rigid laterally. Racers also tend to maintain their chains relatively loose as they are typically using a greater range of swingarm travel and don’t want to risk the chain being too tight. Therefore, given identical chain alignment, one could reasonably predict that a thinner, looser chain must experience greater lateral movement than a thicker, tighter chain and therefore, be more prone to hopping off the sprocket. The guard is certainly ugly, but I’m keeping it on my track bike.
 

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SBK1198, most racers and many track junkies have gone with the 415 conversion in order to reduce rotating mass and that was indeed the case regarding the bike I was referencing. Because the 415 chain is significantly thinner than the 520 chain, it has to be less rigid laterally. Racers also tend to maintain their chains relatively loose as they are typically using a greater range of swingarm travel and don’t want to risk the chain being too tight. Therefore, given identical chain alignment, one could reasonably predict that a thinner, looser chain must experience greater lateral movement than a thicker, tighter chain and therefore, be more prone to hopping off the sprocket. The guard is certainly ugly, but I’m keeping it on my track bike.
There should be no lateral movement at all in a chain, regardless of size. If a chain is properly aligned and tensioned, it will NOT jump off. The only thing that can make it jump off is inproper tension. So like I said, if you keep an eye on the chain tension, you won't have problems. And yes, I have a 415 chain too.
 
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