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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey so I was riding yesterday and it was quite hot outside - probably 85F 30C roughly. Fan was kicking on and off and from a light I gave it a bit more throttle to get in front of a car so I could get into the left turn lane.

As I started to slow down, I pull in the clutch and the revs stay stuck at around 4000 and at first I panicked thinking that my clutch bearing had gone out but then it slowed to 3000, then 2000 and eventually normal.

All this happened as I was slowing down and I had the clutch lever pulled in all the way.

Was this the pollution controls trying to burn something off? Never had this happen before but I could swear I read it here somewhere but couldn't find anything.

After that it didn't happen again the whole way home. I *did* get on the throttle pretty good and then slowed down pretty quickly too. But I've done it before so I don't know why it would have happened just this one time.
 

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Sounds more like a throttle/fuel issue. You said you held the clutch lever in. Be sure that you didn't break the return throttle cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay so if we assume that this is the case, how would I check the throttle cable for a break? I didn't notice anything unusual and it operated normally the rest of the way home.

Could it be 'sticky'? If so, again, how do I check it?

I've only got less than 500 kms on the bike so I'd be severely disappointed if something broke or there was something mechanically wrong but I guess anything is possible.
 

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Your throttle cable may need minor adjusting. There is a small boot just in front of the grip in the cable line. Slide it forward to find the adjustment nuts.
You would need to ensure its tight enough to eliminate slop and play but not so tight that the throttle cannot return quickly on its own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I looked and the throttle cable seems to be fine the way it is - its not the cable at all. I still think this is some type of emissions thing that the engine is trying to maybe burn off something. It runs fine otherwise. It did it again today but not as high - was idling around 2500 for a second or two then went back to normal.
 

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This can be many things.
Battery slowing down, spark plugs cable clearance, some electrical bad contact, some wire bad plugged in, bad fuel, air in the fuel line, etc.
If it happens again, better take your bike to service and check out.

Good luck.
 

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Yesterday I was messing with the set screw that controls minimum idle. If you hold the throttle just above idle after revving it, it does exactly what you described, a slow return.
 

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Yesterday I was messing with the set screw that controls minimum idle. If you hold the throttle just above idle after revving it, it does exactly what you described, a slow return.
Also check to see something isnt binding your throttle grip/tube creating return resistance. Make sure it still snaps back when rapped open and closed.
 

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im having issues in hot weather as well. along with lumpy idle sometimes. I put new iridium plugs in and a smog block off and it corrected it I think those reeds are getting really flimsy in there and they stick or dont completely seal.
 

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I have recently in the last week possibly written off my brand new R3.
Mine was stuck at 5000RPM and never returned to normal. This made it hard going through roundabouts and also stopping at red lights.
In Neutral, the bike would rev constantly at 5000RPM. Now, in order for me to slow the revs down, I would have to engage 1st gear, ride the clutch so that I was almost at the point of stalling the bike with my right foot on the break.
The revving on the bike never changed and I had also noticed that the digital display clock was also losing time.
At first, it was 1 hour behind when the bike started playing up. Then after the crash, it was 2 hours behind. Then after almost two days, I went back to the salvage yard to grab some pictures and I took the opportunity to check the dash display clock. I took the photo at 9:42am but this time the clock was showing 1:00.
Total ball bag of a bike!!!!

Don't get me wrong, nice bike to ride, but shitty quality :(

Instead of hitting a ditch/embankment, I could've hit an oncoming vehicle and lost my life because when trying to come around a 45k corner or less at a constant 5000RPM, the bike is uncontrollable :(
 

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I have recently in the last week possibly written off my brand new R3.
Mine was stuck at 5000RPM and never returned to normal. This made it hard going through roundabouts and also stopping at red lights.
In Neutral, the bike would rev constantly at 5000RPM. Now, in order for me to slow the revs down, I would have to engage 1st gear, ride the clutch so that I was almost at the point of stalling the bike with my right foot on the break.
The revving on the bike never changed and I had also noticed that the digital display clock was also losing time.
At first, it was 1 hour behind when the bike started playing up. Then after the crash, it was 2 hours behind. Then after almost two days, I went back to the salvage yard to grab some pictures and I took the opportunity to check the dash display clock. I took the photo at 9:42am but this time the clock was showing 1:00.
Total ball bag of a bike!!!!

Don't get me wrong, nice bike to ride, but shitty quality :(

Instead of hitting a ditch/embankment, I could've hit an oncoming vehicle and lost my life because when trying to come around a 45k corner or less at a constant 5000RPM, the bike is uncontrollable :(
Sounds like you got a bad bike. I wouldn't generalize the R3 as a bad quality bike though.
More importantly, why would you or anyone try to ride a bike stuck in 5k rpm? That's just asking for trouble. Don't take this the wrong way, but if you did hit oncoming or worse, a pedestrian, I would put the blame on you. Nothing personal, but you decided to operate a malfunctioning vehicle and risk it. You get behind the wheel or on a bike, injure someone, then say something like "it's not my fault my **** quality car/bike revs a constant 5k and I couldn't slow it down enough to avoid that kid/granny/car/cat/dog that got in front of me. " you are he operator, you are responsible for making the decision to not ride it if it doesn't pass pre ride checks.

If you had a bike stuck at 5000k, why were you trying to ride it? Riding a bike, especially on public roads, that doesn't pass your pre-flight inspection is a recipe for disaster.
Lol right?
 

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My bad for not explaining the whole outlining issue of the problem.

I was stuck in Auckland, some 430+ kilometers away from home after picking another helmet form an online sale that was "pick up only". So I thought, this would be a great opportunity to break in the motor. After all, by the time I was to get back home, I'd be roughly 200k off from the first service.

For legal reasons, I can not go into too much detail because this is still an ongoing issue with Yamaha. So to cut the long story short, I was stranded in a BIG city with only enough $$$ to get back home. I did ring the Dealer form where I bought the bike but they wanted me to ride the bike there. Now, with my phone dead for using it as a GPS, that was out of the question. As for the time that I was informed to go to another dealer, by the time I was about to get on the saddle, I only had a matter of minutes to catch the store (where ever it may have been) before they shut.

So now, I was truly stranded and with Auckland business shutting down for the loooong weekend, I had no funds on me to pay for any form of accomodation let alone food for the next 3+ days.
My only option was to get the bike back home where I lived in the same town.

But hey, not everyone like you can tell the future where I could've possibly known that a brand new bike would break down on me!

Should I buy a lotto ticket now?
I would think that you would best keep your trap shut and stop being a condescending judgmental prat!
Not everyone has a glass ball to see the future that could possibly predict and big failure in the bikes design. But in saying that, I think your head is so far up your ass that your belly button needs a glass window so you can see where your going in this world.
Enough said! ;)

Good day sir!
 

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Hey Corrie,

Not to be a jerk Kojiiro is a great guy and not really judgmental but being honest. While it's hard to foresee the issue you were putting others and yourself at risk, it sucks to hear about the situation but the recall should've been done the moment you got the bike. Don't take this the wrong way but the way I look at this is if I can't afford to tow it home after purchasing gear or feed myself then I should've stayed home. Not being judgmental your decisions are your decisions but that's how my decision would've played out to me :).

In any instance it sounds like you are alright and that's what really matters, hopefully you'll be good to go soon on another bike. I've had my R3 for 6 months and have yet to have any issues, the quality feels great to me and the bike is super smooth. With any mechanical object that has hundreds to thousands of moving parts with very little clearance, there's always bound to be a possibility of an issue on one of many.
 

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Hindsight is always 20/20 and if nothing else, it's a lesson learned. The good news here is that you're alive to talk about all of this and bikes can be replaced.

I will say though... something very rare was wrong with that bike. We'll leave it to the engineers to figure out (sounds like this is under investigation but I wouldn't call the R3 "a total bag of a bike"
Scroll through this forum and quickly see just how little has gone wrong since it's release and for those issues that have come up, Yamaha has acted very quickly to resolve them.

Take a peek into the RC390 forum if you want to read up on what can really go wrong with a new bike. We've been pretty fortunate in the R3 world.
 

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Hindsight is always 20/20 and if nothing else, it's a lesson learned. The good news here is that you're alive to talk about all of this and bikes can be replaced.

I will say though... something very rare was wrong with that bike. We'll leave it to the engineers to figure out (sounds like this is under investigation but I wouldn't call the R3 "a total bag of a bike"
Scroll through this forum and quickly see just how little has gone wrong since it's release and for those issues that have come up, Yamaha has acted very quickly to resolve them.

Take a peek into the RC390 forum if you want to read up on what can really go wrong with a new bike. We've been pretty fortunate in the R3 world.
^^ What Aeson has said here is very true, I do believe something probably very wrong happened, try contacting yamaha maybe they'll be very interested to hear about this. Sounds very much like a lemon, was it purchased brand new or used?
 

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It's not a good Indra to run a motor at the same rpm for break in.

I won't say I'm sorry if I offended you because in reality I am not. I would much rather hurt someone's feeling a than see/hear a fellow rider get hurt because they chose not to listen. Hopefully this does become a lesson learned.

Bike forums are brutally honest. Get used to it, but don't get butt hurt about it. Take good advice when it comes.

I don't need a glass ball to see ahead, just some good old common sense. Riding a perfectly running motorcycle around on public roads or even the track is dangerous business. Riding one not functioning perfectly as mentioned is just asking for it.

The point of my post wasn't to get everyone to buy glass balls, rather it's it get you to think ahead and think with a plan. We all experience moments of being spontaneous, but a back up plan never helps. I live in Japan. Most people don't speak English. If I break down or get hurt what do I do? I could call my wife, I could put a piece of duct tape with a contact number on it strapped to my leathers, I could do a few simple things to help me out that much more when something happens.

Some suggestions I would have taken, most involve money/credit card usage, but same as drunk driving, I would rather incur a credit card debt for a few hundred than other debts in the tens to hundreds of thousands:

Tow it
Take a cab
Ask friends family for a ride, leave the bike. If it's stolen, who gives a crap, let insurance do its thing.
Bring tools, being a rider, we tend to learn how our bikes run very quickly.

There are plenty more I am sure but will stop there.

Again, riding is risky business. Two months ago I lost a friend riding up the twisties. Last year another almost died and that ended his amateur racing career. This forum doesn't post too many accidents because he members are world wide. Go join a local forum and you may be alarmed at the "rider down" posts. We don't need more of that filling our forum.
 
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