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Discussion Starter #1
Now I won't be getting my licence till about Febuary 2022, but I do know how to ride a motorcycle.
I have ridden both the RC390 (2019) and the R3 (2017) and I like the R3 more.

But i want to know how it performs as a Commuter motorcycle?
 

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It's always a good idea to do your homework before purchasing a bike. And where better than the bike's Forum to find out the goods and bads.. But since you're on the R3 owners' forum... The R3 is by far your best choice of motorcycles. :rolleyes:
Upper left of this page you'll see "Forums" If you click on that, you'll see any number of categories by subject.. Previous discussions on all sorts of things. That's a good place to get an over-all view. The R3 was introduced in 2015, with few changes other than cosmetics, since... and very little price increase from year to year. Welcome to the Community, and Enjoy.
 

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Now I won't be getting my licence till about Febuary 2022, but I do know how to ride a motorcycle.
I have ridden both the RC390 (2019) and the R3 (2017) and I like the R3 more.

But i want to know how it performs as a Commuter motorcycle?
Well, after riding 12,000 miles on my R3, I can honestly say it performs flawlessly in all conditions. Best bike I ever had, and best pvp bike ever IMO.
* my R3 is extremely modded, and upgraded, and ive never riden a stock R3.
 

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Now I won't be getting my licence till about Febuary 2022, but I do know how to ride a motorcycle.
I have ridden both the RC390 (2019) and the R3 (2017) and I like the R3 more.

But i want to know how it performs as a Commuter motorcycle?
I've only accumulated about 3,000 miles so far on my '19 R3, but so far, it's been excellent. I've been averaging roughly 55 miles per gallon. Like you, it would seem, I tend to do a whole lot of reading and find answers to lots of questions before I commit to any major purchases.

That research has taught me a lot about the R3 and shown me that it should be a very reliable little bike that lasts for many years and MANY thousands of trouble-free miles. It is always possible for something to go wrong and to experience a major failure, but with this particular model, that possibility should be about as low as one could ever reasonably expect.

On that note, I would strongly recommend purchasing a 2019 or later model, as most of the issues with the earlier model-years (some quite serious) were resolved by then. You can even check the VIN online before purchasing to see if there are any recalls that haven't yet been done to a specific bike.

In general, you definitely can't go wrong if you just want a nice little commuter (I do a lot of long distance, high speed highway riding on mine -- and it's awesome for that!) that will put a grin on your face. It's a fun, sporty little bike with enough power to do whatever kind of riding you want on it. The little motor has a smooth and wonderful character to it that does not disappoint (unless one needs 200+ horsepower...LOL), and the fuel injection provides flawless power delivery from 3,000 through 12,000 RPM! The stock gearing is pretty low and should work well on busy/hectic roads in India. The bike is quite light weight for what it is (much lighter and much lighter feeling than the Ninja 500 I used to own). And the handling is really impressive. It transitions back and forth with very little effort and really sticks to the ground/holds a line in a corner without any fuss or drama for the most part (although the rebound damping on the rear shock might be a tad fast -- especially for rough/blemished road surfaces, on which the R3 can occasionally feel slightly twitchy). The R3 is actually surprisingly comfortable during high speed cruising -- for a sport bike, at least (one thing I will note is that the seat is a tad short front-to-back, for a taller person [I'm 6 feet tall], but I've gotten used to that and haven't really found it to be an issue). Plus it looks amazing, which never hurts!




*The only thing I would add, as an aside, is to ask if you have considered dual sport motorcycles (like the Yamaha XT250, for example). If you think you might ever want to go on trails/off road, they can be a great option that can still work very well for commuting. Obviously, a bike like the R3 will be useless off road, so if you think this might be something you'll be interested in doing at some point... But again, aside from that, the R3 is an awesome small bore street bike. Also, if this will be your first bike, don't forget to put some extra money aside for some proper riding gear (helmet, jacket, etc.) before you buy the bike!

Okay, ONE more thing, while I'm here: the R3, in my humble opinion, is a MUCH, MUCH better bike overall compared to a 390 -- especially for commuting!
 

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The R3 will be more comfortable for commuting than the KTM. It is a really fun bike and should work well for commuting. Due to the virus I have not done much commuting to work on mine but riding around the roads out for fun in an even more spirited manner than I would commute I average 65 US MPG.
 

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How tall are you?
If you're tall (5'11" or taller), you might experience fatigue over time due to the riding position of the R3. The fact that the R3 is a cross between a standard and a sport bike means you'll be hunched over most of the ride (especially if you install a rear set which inherently moves the foot pegs toward the rear).

What kind of work do you do?
If you work physical labor, then you might want something more upright or even relaxed; back pain, muscle aches & strains don't jive well with the sport bike riding position, especially if you're a tall rider.

What is your weight fully geared?
If you are heavier than 165lbs fully geared, you'll want to invest in some suspension upgrades (I don't know anything about the 2nd Gen R3 (2019-2021), but the 1st Gen R3 (2015-2018) is severely lacking in suspension. Furthermore, unless you like the fairings of the 2nd Gen, save your money by buying a 1st Gen and upgrade the suspension that meets your weight.

I wrote a bit on cheap suspension upgrades. However, the bit on the Ninja 650 rear shock may be discomforting, as you'll need to raise the bike close to 0.75-inches; this may seem discouraging to shorter riders at first.

How far is your commute?
If your commute is greater than 20 miles one way, if you buy an R3, invest in a seat like the GP-V1 by Saddlemen (verify model fitment). The stock seat is a pain in the ass. Also, the stock windscreen isn't formidable for tall riders (or maybe even any commuters in that case); you may end up choosing to purchase a double bubble windscreen.

Alternative Choices
Also, I would test ride the MT-03 if I were you; that bike with a windscreen might be a better choice as a commuter. Look into other upright motorcycles as well. While the MT-03 does sport an upright seating position, it is a "hyper naked" sport bike; which means there are no fairings (which may not be favorable at 60+ mph (highway speeds).

Arguments in Favor of the R3
Reasons I would recommend you buy the R3: If you're a weekend or seasonal rider, are shorter than 5'11", and don't work a physically laborious job (like construction or night stocking).

Conclusion
Unless you fit the description of the Japanese Yamaha R3 rider to the T, you'll be spending a pretty penny on modifications to make it fit you. If that's what you want, do it! If not, then ask yourself what you truly need and do some more research into a beginner's sport upright. I don't have many good examples as I haven't done much research on it (maybe I will update this post with other options in the future).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wow never expected so many replies (I know its like 4 replies but for an introverted guy like me it's alot).

When i rode the 2017 R3 i was surprised as the seating position was more upright then I had imagined and I'm pretty sure my back would die on the RC as the Riding Position is more committed.

While I do plan to ride off-road (not on the R3) i have another bike in my sights (Yamaha RX135 2-Stroke from the early 2000's) for off roading.

My parents didn't really pay that much attention to gear but something happened today, They know that a helmet is needed but untill today they thought that these "Motorcycle gloves Jackets and pants are a scam" and " You don't really need them".

Today I was practising on my uncles old Yamaha FZ-S (150c Single) and i went through a small dirt road, I was wearing a Helmet, A hoodie and Shorts and guess what i fell.

Now let's just say my right knee looks like someone took a knife and gave my knee a big ol cut (I'm fine BTW) and now they are FINALLY taking motorcycle safety seriously.

I have one more question, how is the aftermarket for the R3?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
How tall are you?
If you're tall (5'11" or taller), you might experience fatigue over time due to the riding position of the R3. The fact that the R3 is a cross between a standard and a sport bike means you'll be hunched over most of the ride (especially if you install a rear set which inherently moves the foot pegs toward the rear).

What kind of work do you do?
If you work physical labor, then you might want something more upright or even relaxed; back pain, muscle aches & strains don't jive well with the sport bike riding position, especially if you're a tall rider.

What is your weight fully geared?
If you are heavier than 165lbs fully geared, you'll want to invest in some suspension upgrades (I don't know anything about the 2nd Gen R3 (2019-2021), but the 1st Gen R3 (2015-2018) is severely lacking in suspension. Furthermore, unless you like the fairings of the 2nd Gen, save your money by buying a 1st Gen and upgrade the suspension that meets your weight.

I wrote a bit on cheap suspension upgrades. However, the bit on the Ninja 650 rear shock may be discomforting.

How far is your commute?
If your commute is greater than 20 miles one way, if you buy an R3, invest in a seat like the GP-V1 by Saddlemen (verify model fitment). The stock seat is a pain in the ass. Also, the stock windscreen isn't formidable for tall riders (or maybe even any commuters in that case); you may end up choosing to purchase a double bubble windscreen.

Alternative Choices
Also, I would test ride the MT-03 if I were you; that bike with a windscreen might be a better choice as a commuter. Look into other upright motorcycles as well. While the MT-03 does sport an upright seating position, it is a "hyper naked" sport bike; which means there are no fairings (which may not be favorable at 60+ mph (highway speeds).

Arguments in Favor of the R3
Reasons I would recommend you buy the R3: If you're a weekend or seasonal rider, are shorter than 5'11", and don't work a physically laborious job (like construction or night stocking).

Conclusion
Unless you fit the description of the Japanese Yamaha R3 rider to the T, you'll be spending a pretty penny on modifications to make it fit you. If that's what you want, do it! If not, then ask yourself what you truly need and do some more research into a beginner's sport upright. I don't have many good examples as I haven't done much research on it (maybe I will update this post with other options in the future).
How tall are you?
a. I'm around 5'8" and 5'9"

How far is your Commute?
A. Around 40km or about 25 miles in Freedom Units

What is your weight fully geared?
A. I'm currently about 205lbs fully geared but i am working on losing my Lockdown weight and I would say about 180lbs by the time i actually buy the Bike.

What kind of work do you do?
A. Not Physical at all, but i do workout.

Alternatives
A. I would actually like the MT03 but it's currently just "Rumored" to come to India in 2021 but i'm 98% sure the R3 is coming back to India in 2021, other than that I ruled out the Ninja 300 as Kawasaki's are more expensive to maintain in India. My ass would never forgive my if I got a RC 390. There is the TVS Apache RR310 (it shares it's engine with the BMW G310r and G310 GS) so I guess there is that. But for now its R3 vs Duke vs RR310 (and the MT03 if it comes to India before 2022).
 

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How far is your Commute?
A. Around 40km or about 25 miles in Freedom Units
:ROFLMAO: Freedom units.

There seems to be quite a bit of aftermarket at least here in the US. But I will be honest, spending a ton on this bike outside of racing it on the track isn't the best financial decision. The big money is obviously on performance parts and again, outside of the track that really isn't worth it in my opinion. That said, I did do some cosmetic things. :)
 

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How tall are you?
a. I'm around 5'8" and 5'9"

How far is your Commute?
A. Around 40km or about 25 miles in Freedom Units

What is your weight fully geared?
A. I'm currently about 205lbs fully geared but i am working on losing my Lockdown weight and I would say about 180lbs by the time i actually buy the Bike.

What kind of work do you do?
A. Not Physical at all, but i do workout.

Alternatives
A. I would actually like the MT03 but it's currently just "Rumored" to come to India in 2021 but i'm 98% sure the R3 is coming back to India in 2021, other than that I ruled out the Ninja 300 as Kawasaki's are more expensive to maintain in India. My ass would never forgive my if I got a RC 390. There is the TVS Apache RR310 (it shares it's engine with the BMW G310r and G310 GS) so I guess there is that. But for now its R3 vs Duke vs RR310 (and the MT03 if it comes to India before 2022).
Before your post, I hadn't much concern about availability; it's definitely a deciding-factor. When you get suggestions, perhaps you'll know of a comparable alternative that is available in your country.

Your height, commute time, and occupation seems like a good fit for the R3 (it'll definitely be a fun commuter).
Your weight however, may be a problem with stock suspension - of which there are plenty options.

I found an article that suggested a few interesting alternatives; these may (or may not) pique your fancy.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Before your post, I hadn't much concern about availability; it's definitely a deciding-factor. When you get suggestions, perhaps you'll know of a comparable alternative that is available in your country.

Your height, commute time, and occupation seems like a good fit for the R3 (it'll definitely be a fun commuter).
Your weight however, may be a problem with stock suspension - of which there are plenty options.

I found an article that suggested a few interesting alternatives; these may (or may not) pique your fancy.
Kawasaki is immediately off of my list as the maintenance cost of Kawasaki's are higher in India.

Hyosung is Discontinued I believe.

The R15 is a legend in India so that's a great option.

The Pulsar RS200 is a good Motorcycle but Bajaj isn't really know for their build quality.

The G310GS and KTM 390 Adventure are actually good options as then I don't have to get a seperate bike to go off-roading (the GS is better on the dirt but the KTM pulls ahead in the highway both bikes are pretty evenly matched for city use.)

Now Royal Enfield has promised the Indian market a new bike or now varient every quarter from 2021 onwards and they seem to be testing a Cruiser to Launch based on the Interceptor and Continental GT 650, while I'm not really into cruisers this looks like more Roadster than Fat Boy.

There are also rumours that a Himalayan 650 is in the works and will be priced around the G310GS and Duke 390(not adventure).

If that's the case then the Himalayan 650 would be a better option as Royal Enfield's engines are know to be simple and maintenance is low and as an added bonus I don't have to buy another Motorcycle to go off-roading.

The regular Himalayan (400cc single) is already a great adventure tourer and can crush even the Duke 390 Adventure and G310GS off road and is a great commuter.

So if the Himalayan 650 comes out before February 2022 then it's a no brainer, I get one bike to do everything, Touring - Check, Off-roading - Check, Commuting - Check
 

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Trying not to be biased.

RC390
  • = A little more power
  • = More track ready than the R3, if you're that way inclined
- = Comes in one colour scheme (as far as I know?). Huge minus in my opinion.

R3
+ = Reliability
  • = Comes in MANY colour schemes, and even different shapes (up to 2018 vs 2019+)
  • = More nimble around corners
- = Not as powerful
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Trying not to be biased.

RC390
  • = A little more power
  • = More track ready than the R3, if you're that way inclined
- = Comes in one colour scheme (as far as I know?). Huge minus in my opinion.

R3
+ = Reliability
  • = Comes in MANY colour schemes, and even different shapes (up to 2018 vs 2019+)
  • = More nimble around corners
- = Not as powerful
Don't care about being track ready, bike will be used for commuting, Touring and Hooning around town.

Don't even care about the power, everything from 7hp diesel Motorcycles to a Ninja H2R will excite me
 

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Currently then, you're in favor of
  • Himalayan 650
  • Yamaha R15 V3
  • Yamaha R3
But you do appreciate the touring-aspect of the Himalayan 650.
I'm sure you can switch out the wheels on the 650 for street performance, as well.
Maybe even have two sets of wheels - one for street, one for trails.

I think the most important thing here is what we're doing - figuring it out before you purchase a motorcycle; I think (no matter what people say about cost), purchasing a motorcycle is a huge decision and will definitely affect your daily life, depending on what choice you make.

I'm happy this forum provides you with the ability to discuss these things.

Hopefully the forum topics will get a rework so these discussions can be had in most appropriate places.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Currently then, you're in favor of
  • Himalayan 650
  • Yamaha R15 V3
  • Yamaha R3
But you do appreciate the touring-aspect of the Himalayan 650.
I'm sure you can switch out the wheels on the 650 for street performance, as well.
Maybe even have two sets of wheels - one for street, one for trails.

I think the most important thing here is what we're doing - figuring it out before you purchase a motorcycle; I think (no matter what people say about cost), purchasing a motorcycle is a huge decision and will definitely affect your daily life, depending on what choice you make.

I'm happy this forum provides you with the ability to discuss these things.
I am really looking forward for the Upcoming Himalayan 650 for it's versatility as it can take you take you to work and back, go on a 3 week tour without breaking a sweat and crush trails (I say upcoming as it's basically confirmed as the previous CEO Siddarth Lal blatantly just said "Yeah we got a Himalayan 650 in the works" in an interview.)

I appreciate the touring aspect of the Himalayan as I know for a fact that I will be dragged to go on a tour, My uncle (the one who basically fueled my for bikes and whose bike I'm learning on) is getting the upcoming Cruiser 650 from RE and my other Uncle is getting a Classic 350 so I know for a fact that they will go on a tours 4-5 times a year and will ask me to tag along (Royal Enfield used to do a sort of Rider Festival every year in Goa before Covid Hit and I'm pretty sure I will be dragged to that event every year after covid passes) so I appreciate the touring capability but I like the off-road ability more, that what I love about ADV bikes they can Cruise the highway comfortably and if the road ended my adventure didn't have to.

I like both the R3 and R15 because they are good sport bikes and can go touring if I want to so yeah.

I'm not one to look at the spec sheet as for me:

1. Specs DO NOT matter, I've swung my leg over everything from Royal Enfield Diesel Motorcycles with 7hp and a Modified RC390 with 53hp and I've walked away with a big ass grin on my face everytime.

2. For me Motorcycles are about emotion than performance, sure performance matters but for me it's more about Emotion. I could buy a Brand spanking new Honda CBR1000RR FireBlade that I don't really emotionally identify with and I'd probably want to sell it and move on in a year or so and in the same way I could buy a Simple 125cc commuter with barely 12hp but if I really emotionally connect with it I will keep it forever and do everything on my power to keep that tiny 125cc commuter running forever.
 

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The other thing to consider before purchasing your first motorcycle is to learn about its parts availability in your country and the cost of repairs if they need to be done (some shops may charge more for a specific motorcycle, depending on its popularity in your country).

Additionally, you may want to look into the aftermarket parts availability as well (in case you want to change up your configuration, find out how difficult it may be to acquire aftermarket parts before purchasing the motorcycle.

Lastly, you should also find out how well people support your choice online (such as finding a VerticalScope Powersports forum which has a knowledgeable, active user base), like Facebook Groups or other internet forums.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The other thing to consider before purchasing your first motorcycle is to learn about its parts availability in your country and the cost of repairs if they need to be done (some shops may charge more for a specific motorcycle, depending on its popularity in your country).

Additionally, you may want to look into the aftermarket parts availability as well (in case you want to change up your configuration, find out how difficult it may be to acquire aftermarket parts before purchasing the motorcycle.

Lastly, you should also find out how well people support your choice online (such as finding a VerticalScope Powersports forum which has a knowledgeable, active user base), like Facebook Groups or other internet forums.
I don't think I really need to worry about parts availability or maintenance.

1. Most of the manufacturers on my list have a **** ton of dealerships in my city (Bangalore) with the exception of BMW but the other manufacturers like KTM, Yamaha, Royal Enfield etc have a **** ton of dealerships in my city, **** I know 2 KTM, 1 Yamaha and One Royal Enfield dealership that are like a 8-10 minute commute at most from my place, **** I could probably walk to the Royal Enfield one if I wanted to.

2. Aftermarket parts shouldn't be an issue too as most of bikes on my Shortlist are pretty popular and have a **** ton of aftermarket parts available, KTM's are literally everywhere, Royal Enfield is a household brand here in India so no problems there, Yamaha is also pretty well supported and again with the exception of the BMW bikes (G310R and G310GS) but since it shares the engine with the TVS Apache RR310 I expect the aftermarket support to pick up and the fact that the new BS6 G310R and G310GS are like $800 cheaper before Taxes and insurance I expect both aftermarket and sales to pick up in the coming months.

3. I'm lucky enough to have an uncle who is well connected, he knows exactly where to get aftermarket parts for the cheapest and get **** fixed for the cheap, most of the mechanics he knows are people who used to work at Official service centres so I know my bike is in good hands and most of the people he buys parts from are people who know where to semi-legally source legal parts and are therefore cheap as they can be. For example a week ago the Odometer and Speedometer on our family scooter (2013 Vespa LX125) decided that it had had enough after 39,000KM and decided to not work anymore, so my uncle took the scooter to a mechanic that knows his way around scooter and he got it fixed in a day and for about a quarter of what the local Piaggio Service Center Quoted with all new parts.

So unless I pick the Indian born Bavarian singles I'm 100% good on both Maintenance and Aftermarket parts.
 
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