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Maybe I'm looking at this the wrong way, but I see track events as a way to hone my riding abilities in a relatively safe environment. Of course, the plan would be novice classes and my goal wouldn't be to set fast laps, rather my concern is just gaining experience and getting better. Everything I learn there will make me a better and safer street rider. Am I looking at this the wrong way though?

Ultimately the bulk, if not all of my riding would eventually be at the track at some point.

For whatever it's worth I do have track experience in my car.
 

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If you feel comfortable going full throttle up to 100mph, can operate your clutch and shifter smoothly, and can assess how much you need to slow down to make turns you'll be fine. First few sessions in C group everyone is still feeling out the track anyways so you'll just pick up speed as the day goes on. I say start gearing up now if you haven't already so the expenses don't hit you all at once.
 

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Honestly, very little experience. Most track days have skill level groups and the lowest skill level group are all pretty new and typically aren't pushing it at all. As long as you know how to ride a bike, I'd say go.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I can operate everything smoothly, but I'm not rev matching downshifts yet.

To start, I was expecting something at this pace:


Is that typical pace for all novice level classes?

Thanks.
 

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That is an excellent course, and if you have the opportunity to do it, I strongly encourage it.


As for riding experience before doing that, you should be able to operate the motorcycle without having to explicitly think about it - you have to be past the "Which lever does the brake" and "what does a clutch do" phase. Being able to rev-match downshifts is a would-be-nice, but not essential yet.
 

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That is an excellent course, and if you have the opportunity to do it, I strongly encourage it.


As for riding experience before doing that, you should be able to operate the motorcycle without having to explicitly think about it - you have to be past the "Which lever does the brake" and "what does a clutch do" phase. Being able to rev-match downshifts is a would-be-nice, but not essential yet.
Rev-match downshifting isn't really necessary on bikes. Wet clutch handles the abuse way better than a car would but at the end of the day it's all rider preference. I do it when I'm gradually slowing down on the streets but when I'm hard on the brakes I just let my clutch sort out the engine speed. Both work good.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Awesome, I'm definitely going to signup then. I'm comfortable in being able to handle the bike safely and smoothly, I'm just worried about my pace being too slow and holding other riders up or the class expecting too much too soon. The way California Super Bike School structures their novice classes sounds perfect and I'm hoping I can find a similar structure.

Unfortunately I don't have them in my area though.

I have evolvegt.com and n2td.org if anyone is familiar with those guys.
 

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Awesome, I'm definitely going to signup then. I'm comfortable in being able to handle the bike safely and smoothly, I'm just worried about my pace being too slow and holding other riders up or the class expecting too much too soon.
IMO, if you're comfortable on the bike and with passing and being passed, you'll be fine and have a blast. Every first timer worries that they'll be too slow but there's always someone faster and always someone slower. Don't be shy about talking to the trackday providers to show you some lines, they are there to help. You'll also wonder why you didn't do it sooner.
 

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The only shitty thing about track days is that it’s more addicting than buying parts. I think I did 19 track days from April 2017 until June 2018. Then I did a 7 month deployment and did 4 trackdays after getting back in the middle of winter in less than a month lol. It’s addicting.
 

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I did my first track day after only riding a a month or two. I think I passed the break in miles but don't quote me on that. Different groups are different of course, but Novice groups around here tend to be at least somewhat structured, but either way go ahead and speak up about it being your first time and that you haven't been riding long. They might even ask the group for that info, anyway!


So that group wasn't super structured, but a Control Rider(sometimes called coaches, safety riders, etc) would find me on track and show me lines and such, then chat with me afterward once he found out it was my first go.



The org I usually ride with has a very structured novice group that is quite a bit of hand holding, especially the first sessions of the day, but it's pretty helpful if you're new. Can get a bit old once you've been riding with them for a while, but that's just more incentive to hone your skills and move up a group.



Another option is to do something more like a class event. I did a Sportbike 101 class and it was very structured and had all kinds of people with different experience and track desires. I'd always recommend this sort of thing for everyone, since it also tends to mean you get 1-3 people per coach so there's a lot more actual coaching with the drills.



As someone else mentioned, check out what gear and bike prep each org requires and get that in order, then pick one and go!
 
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Maybe I'm looking at this the wrong way, but I see track events as a way to hone my riding abilities in a relatively safe environment. Of course, the plan would be novice classes and my goal wouldn't be to set fast laps, rather my concern is just gaining experience and getting better. Everything I learn there will make me a better and safer street rider. Am I looking at this the wrong way though?

Ultimately the bulk, if not all of my riding would eventually be at the track at some point.

For whatever it's worth I do have track experience in my car.
Jay86, will you be at NCBike this weekend with EvolveGT? If so, a couple of us from the board should be there and can help you with who's who and what's where if you'd like.

Let me know here or via PM and we can make arrangements to connect at the track.
 

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If you are comfortable at the controls, you will be fine at the track. Most TD organizations have control riders for beginner groups. Usually round robin with classes in between in the morning. Afternoon is less restricted, and usually does not allow inside passing in the corners. Trust me, you will learn more in one track day than in a year at the track. Don't delay.
 

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If you are comfortable at the controls, you will be fine at the track. Most TD organizations have control riders for beginner groups. Usually round robin with classes in between in the morning. Afternoon is less restricted, and usually does not allow inside passing in the corners. Trust me, you will learn more in one track day than in a year at the track. Don't delay.

Make that....." Trust me, you will learn more in one track day than in a year on the street."
 
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