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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a new rider, with limited dirt bikes a long time ago and a recent MSF. I plan to buy a R3 about 800 miles from where I live (for a variety of reasons), have about a week to get comfortable on the bike, then drive it home from Idaho to SF (where I live; mostly interstate travel).

I realize this totally depends on the person, but am I crazy to think I could cross-country after about a week? I'm thinking about 200-300 miles/day. Alternative is to ship the bike home, but I'm moderately confident I could be comfortable enough to drive home long distance (even at freeway speeds, provided I play it very cool).

Has anyone tried a cross-country after pretty limited experience? Any pointers? I will of course be ATGATT.

Thanks!
 

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I remember the first time I merged onto the interstate years back on my FZR600. I felt naked haha! Now I don't even think about it. I'm assuming you are buying this bike used? So many variables go into a bike you are new to. I rode an FZR400 from Atlanta back to Kingsport, TN at night in the rain while a new rider and the bike's battery was dead (so I had to push start every time I filled up) and the rotors were warped....it was interesting, at least the R3 is a newer bike. At least you get a week to familiarize yourself with the bike. Look at the chain/sprockets, tire condition/life, are all the lights working? Last oil change? Etc. If you take it easy and plan it out you should be fine, but if you have no means of towing it back, shipping should only be $250-350 if you set it up on UShip. It ultimately depends on how comfortable you are on the bike and in that week I'd hop on the interstate some and see how you feel at speed with the traffic. Make sure the fuel gauge etc. is working, get rain gear, make sure to have ear plugs...charge your phone completely before hitting the road. I'm sure there is a ton more...just rambling off some thoughts/ideas. I have made a 1,500 mile round trip on my Ducati Monster as well and it was an adventure that I barely made home on the rear tire >:D

Most importantly have fun and be safe.
 

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I would ship it. Not so much because of lack of experience only, but mainly because an 800-mile trip would be a pain on an R3.

I had a bike shipped almost 1000 miles from Atlanta to Lincoln, NE for like $360. I bought my R3 in Dallas, which is about 630 miles away and I drove there, picked it up in the back of the truck and drove back.
 

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dont ship it, after you ride it home it will be like a close friend to you....the start of a great partnership
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone for the feedback. I'm still planning to ride back, but I will try the freeway first, and if I freak, I'll be shipping :)
 

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I think someone mentioned it already, but as far as a brand new bike, break in, a long ass trip on the interstate and varying RpMs, I don't think this is going to work out for you. At any rate if you decide to do it anyways my only real advice is stay sharp and focused, don't get tired, and good luck. I am not sure how much skill you would need to ride a bike on a relatively straight interstate across part of the country, but I do know you need a lot of focus as the days get long and tiring.
 

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^Yep. The interstate part will be the easiest. It takes almost no skill to sit on a bike, put it in 6th gear and ride in a straight line. But all the other non-interstate riding is what will get you, like every time you have to stop to fill up with gas or get food or just to stretch your legs. You're going to be stopping every 2 hours or less even. The R3 is not a touring bike. It will be very uncomfortable on a ride this long, like any other sport bike. I don't think I've ever done more than 3-4 hour rides on any sportbike I've owned (1.5 hours on interstate was max, and that sucked), and after that your body can be a bit sore, especially your ass and hands.

Oh and it's still just a bike...it ain't gonna be your best friend. It's not a living thing. Riding it or shipping won't make you like it any more or less.
 
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I think someone mentioned it already, but as far as a brand new bike, break in, a long ass trip on the interstate and varying RpMs, I don't think this is going to work out for you. At any rate if you decide to do it anyways my only real advice is stay sharp and focused, don't get tired, and good luck. I am not sure how much skill you would need to ride a bike on a relatively straight interstate across part of the country, but I do know you need a lot of focus as the days get long and tiring.
This x1000 - As a relatively new rider (~7months) I recently completed an all day trip to the beach and back with some buddies. It was something like 400 miles of riding we started at 9am until 8pm (when I got home). Even with plenty of breaks and stopping at the beach for a few hours the ride back was BRUTAL. My knees hurt so bad by the time I got home I could hardly go up the stairs.

Keeping your concentration is difficult and that much highway/freeway gets old really quick, especially on a really light R3 if it's windy out on the highway (definitely tires you out).

Honestly, I'd tell you not to do it for 2 reasons 1) Probably a bad idea being a newer street rider 2) Not great for break in - if you DO go through with it, keep varying the RPM's and upshifting/downshifting constantly -- this will tire you out. Once you start the ride you'll be in for the long haul - your joints will probably be begging for forgiveness. I thought I was ready for my all day ride after normally riding 4-6hrs several times per week, I was dead wrong.
 

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^ The R3 is not a touring bike. It will be very uncomfortable on a ride this long, like any other sport bike.
Pshhhh, did this on my stocker:p


Really though, I would never do this on a brand new bike as a relatively new rider. Riding is physically and mentally demanding, and you need a certain level of fitness to do it. You just don't have a feel of things yet and may miss some really important clues your body is throwing at you.
 
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