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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ok, I usually don't write stuff like this up so I may have to edit it a couple times to get everything in. :D Sorry for the bad pics. I thought they were turning out better than they did.

Also, I am not a certified tech. If you undertake this project you do so at your own risk. This worked for me, but I cannot guarantee it will work for you (lawyer disclaimer).

What you will need:
SKF bearing # 61901 2Z (Purchased from Motion Industries)
Rubber mallet or deadblow hammer
Two drain pans
Ratchet (3/8" or 1/4")
3", or longer, socket extension
10mm socket
8mm socket
JIS screwdriver
5mm allen wrench
Large flat bladed screwdriver
Torque wrench (I used 1/4" because of the low torque values)
Blue loctite
Bearing driver
Water pump gasket (optional)
Clutch side gasket (optional)




1. Drain oil

I had read that you didn't need to drain it. This is COMPLETELY wrong. If you don't drain your oil you will have a mess fall on you when you pull the clutch cover off. I drained mine into a clean pan so I could reuse it. Mine only had 15 minutes of use on it. You do not have to take off your oil filter if you are going to reuse your oil.

2. Drain coolant

I started by disconnecting the hose from the radiator to the water pump. I know you can take out the drain plug (location circled in the below image) but I have found the coolant usually shoots out at you instead of nicely draining. Again I had a clean pan for the coolant to drain into if you really want to reuse it. I will be replacing mine as it is engine ice and I replace it yearly.

Remember to take the cover off the radiator to aid in better drainage.

After the coolant has drained a bit I removed the coolant drain plug in the water pump cover to make sure most of the coolant had been drained.



3. Remove water pump cover

Use a star pattern and lightly loosen the bolts. After all are loosened completely remove them.

Remember, the longest bolt goes back in the top hole.



I needed to use a dead blow hammer to get the cover off. Be gentle and don't just whack it. Take your time, it will come off.

Wipe up any remaining coolant so you don't have any getting into the crankcase when you take the clutch side cover off.

6. Remove clutch cable

You will need to pull up the tab on the clutch rod actuator so that the clutch cable can be removed. The tab is circled in yellow in the pic below. I then used a large flat bladed screwdriver to push the actuator forward in order to remove the clutch cable.

Take note of how much play is in the actuator after the clutch cable has been removed. You will need to know this when you put the clutch cover back on.



5. Remove clutch cover

Lightly loosen the bolts in a star like pattern on the clutch cover. After all the bolts are loosened then remove them. For most of you there will be some bolts that are different lengths. Take note of where the longer bolts go. I had a T-Rex cover on mine so I was just able to remove that and keep those bolts in the T-Rex cover holes.

Again use a rubber mallet or dead blow hammer to gently tap the cover until it lets go. Again, take your time here. You don't want to damage the other clutch actuator rod that sits inside the pressure plate bearing. It has splines on it that you don't want to damage.

If you are careful you will be able to remove the gasket by running your hand along the front of the gasket/back of the clutch cover to free it from the clutch cover. Be prepared to have a spare on hand in case you do need to replace it though.

6. Remove pressure plate

Remove the four bolts holding the clutch springs and pressure plate on. Again, I used a star pattern out of habit. First slightly loosened the 4 bolts and then completely removed them.



7. Remove old bearing/install new

Take note of how deep the bearing is seated in the pressure plate.

I heated up the pressure plate slightly with a propane torch and then removed the bearing with an appropriately sized socket. I wasn't worried about ruining this bearing.

After the old bearing was out, I again lightly heated up the pressure plate and drove the new bearing in with an aluminum bearing driver. I know some people use sockets to do this. I don't like this idea when setting in a new bearing. Especially one this small. I feel the risk of damaging the cage with steel on steel contact is just to high. Make sure the bearing is seated as the original one had come out.







8. Reassemble

After the bearing is seated just start the reverse of what you have done. Don't forget to put the actuator rod back behind the pressure plate!

Torque the pressure plate bolts down to 10Nm (7.2ft/lbs) Again, I used a star pattern.

Then comes the hard part. Putting the clutch cover back on. You need to get the actuator rod that is seated behind the pressure plate to fit inside the splines of the clutch cable activated rod that is mounted on the clutch cover. The problem comes in with getting the correct amount of play you had on the cable activated rod that you had prior to removal. This will probably take several attempts. (At least it did for me.)

Once you get the clutch actuator in the correct position button everything back up. All bolts will be torqued to 10Nm or 7.2ft/lbs. You will need to put loctite on the two bolts that hold the clutch cable bracket attached to the clutch cover. Again, use a star pattern when tightening these bolts.

Use the large screwdriver to force the clutch actuator over so you can reattach the clutch cable. Bend down the tab to keep the clutch cable on. I will have to look up recommended length of the clutch cable from where it is inserted into the actuator to the first bolt on the cable bracket. I think it was 52mm-64mm. Service manual is in the garage right now though.

Fill with coolant and oil and test clutch then.

I think that is it.
 

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Excellent write-up! Nice photos, too.

I was hoping to see a picture of the inside of the clutch cover. Did you happen to snap a pic of that?
 

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Did yours go out or was this just a precaution?
 

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Nice writeup. Guess one thing you could add is the bearing manufacturer, model #, and where you got it. I'm supposing that you didn't just put a stock bearing back in after going to all this trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Nice writeup. Guess one thing you could add is the bearing manufacturer, model #, and where you got it. I'm supposing that you didn't just put a stock bearing back in after going to all this trouble.
Updated with bearing brand, number and where I got it from. It is the first thing listed in what you need.
 

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Good write up. I really hope I don't have to ever use it. I hate turning wrenches. I suck at it yet am not rich enough to pay someone else its a terrible terrible thing
 

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Will the YES warranty cover this? I'm assuming they would for non race bikes. Also curious if they would update the part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Will the YES warranty cover this? I'm assuming they would for non race bikes. Also curious if they would update the part.
They would fix this under warranty if it broke in that time frame. Problem is they would just replace it with the same OEM part.

I guess you could ask them to put in a bearing you bought. I doubt a dealership would talked that risk though.
 

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Thanks so much for the great writeup. This forum is an amazing resource, filled with great folks.

Just a little more detail on how you removed the bearing?

So you just heat up the pressure plate, and use a socket head to hammer against to punch out the bearing? Is there any directionality regarding which side it push out from?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks so much for the great writeup. This forum is an amazing resource, filled with great folks.

Just a little more detail on how you removed the bearing?

So you just heat up the pressure plate, and use a socket head to hammer against to punch out the bearing? Is there any directionality regarding which side it push out from?
Yes to the socket head and yes to direction.

You need to push the bearing out towards the backside of the pressure plate.
 

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71901 handles axial load better. 61901 is not made to handle axial load. This is an engineering design failure from yamaha IMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
You are assuming the axial load is what is causing the failure. It may be something else though. It could be the open cage design, not enough oil getting to the bearing, or something else.

By the way, if you want that 71901 bearing it is going to cost you, A LOT! $851.00!
 
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