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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the proper way to take a corner? I sometimes try to shift to lower gear before the turn and stay steady on the throttle. There are times where I find myself holding the clutch in to take the corner then shift and go. How do I properly take corners? Ultimately how do I get lean and take corner at higher speeds? Thanks fellas
 

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There are going to be a bunch of different answers to this. Brake and downshift if needed before the corner to the appropriate speed. Look through the turn. Push left or right to lean the bike left or right and initiate your turn. Outside, inside, outside. Basics. More people will add more to that.

Not sure why you are holding the clutch in though. Not sure why you are downshifting. Just put the bike in the appropriate gear for the speed the corner dictates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There are going to be a bunch of different answers to this. Brake and downshift if needed before the corner to the appropriate speed. Look through the turn. Push left or right to lean the bike left or right and initiate your turn. Outside, inside, outside. Basics. More people will add more to that.

Not sure why you are holding the clutch in though. Not sure why you are downshifting. Just put the bike in the appropriate gear for the speed the corner dictates.


I find myself holding the clutch in when the turn comes to quick on me and I'm going to fast into the turn, therefore I hold the clutch through the apex and then shift to appropriate gear and go.


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I find myself holding the clutch in when the turn comes to quick on me and I'm going to fast into the turn, therefore I hold the clutch through the apex and then shift to appropriate gear and go.


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If you are holding the clutch in, you will not have any engine brake, which means you are actually going faster. Let the clutch out, open and close your throttle as necessary.

Another thing you should take note is target fixation and counter steering.
 

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I find myself holding the clutch in when the turn comes to quick on me and I'm going to fast into the turn, therefore I hold the clutch through the apex and then shift to appropriate gear and go.


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Start braking and setting up your speed before the corner. In general, on the street, you don't want to be braking through a corner. Braking straightens the bike up. What happens when you straighten up the bike in a turn? The bike comes up and you go wide.
 

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If you are holding the clutch in, you will not have any engine brake, which means you are actually going faster. Let the clutch out, open and close your throttle as necessary.

Another thing you should take note is target fixation and counter steering.
Wait if the clutch is in, no power would be getting to the wheel, he shouldn't be going faster than when he had the clutch lever out.
 

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I just finished watching... yeah now I wanna go out and try all this new stuff thanks for the heads up on the youtube tip!
 

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I would never pull the clutch in on a turn; always throttle through the turn, even if it's very minimal throttle that barely accelerates the bike, to throw the weight towards the back and stabilize the bike. If you're going too fast in a turn, then counter-steer more to increase your lean, even if you only realize you're going too fast mid-way through a turn. To start learning how to body-position your leans properly (because you can lean improperly and actually upset the stability of the bike further than if you didn't shift your body), try to "kiss" the inside mirror in a turn. This naturally causes your body to physically shift over on the seat without getting crossed up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys! I'm excited to go and apply this information. Just another great reason I love my r3! Just a great bike to learn and improve on my riding skills.


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Wait if the clutch is in, no power would be getting to the wheel, he shouldn't be going faster than when he had the clutch lever out.
If your clutch is in, you are free wheeling, there won't be any engine brake at all, so you will be going faster.

Start braking and setting up your speed before the corner. In general, on the street, you don't want to be braking through a corner. Braking straightens the bike up. What happens when you straighten up the bike in a turn? The bike comes up and you go wide.
To add on, using your brake lever/pedal increases your chance of flipping haha. Let engine brake control your speed
 

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If your clutch is in, you are free wheeling, there won't be any engine brake at all, so you will be going faster.



To add on, using your brake lever/pedal increases your chance of flipping haha. Let engine brake control your speed
Sorry but if you are preferring to engine brake an R3 over normal front brakes because you are afraid to increase your chance of flipping the bike, you really need to practice your braking technique.
 

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Sorry but if you are preferring to engine brake an R3 over normal front brakes because you are afraid to increase your chance of flipping the bike, you really need to practice your braking technique.
It's not that i prefer engine braking over front brake. Under normal come-to-stop circumstances, of course front brake would be the best. But when it comes to cornering, I refrain myself from touching the brakes, and play with only the throttle to control my speed.
 

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A lot of interesting ideas here. A few that are just plain wrong.

First thing you should do is SLOW DOWN!

If you are uncomfortable going through corners you need to get some training. Not internet, or even Keith Code video info. Actual, on track/street, training. You are going to crash if you don't slow down. Instead of spending money on replacement parts after a crash, spend it on training to avoid the crash before it happens.

As to clutch in through a corner, this is dangerous. Doing this removes the power and weight to the rear tire. That weight and power keeps the bike planted through the corner. At slow speed it really isn't a big deal. Once you start picking up the speed it won't end well. It unloads the rear suspension and takes traction away from the rear tire. This makes your contact patch smaller and more likely to lose overall traction.

Front brake will tend to stand you up or cause you to go wide in a corner. This really shouldn't be a concern on the street though. Don't push it on the street. Conditions are to variable and unknown. Rear brake will tighten your line. At your level don't use either. Get all your braking done BEFORE the corner. Better to go through to slow than to fast. Too much front brake through a turn can cause the front to wash out.

Again, get some real face to face training. That is what you really need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
A lot of interesting ideas here. A few that are just plain wrong.

First thing you should do is SLOW DOWN!

If you are uncomfortable going through corners you need to get some training. Not internet, or even Keith Code video info. Actual, on track/street, training. You are going to crash if you don't slow down. Instead of spending money on replacement parts after a crash, spend it on training to avoid the crash before it happens.

As to clutch in through a corner, this is dangerous. Doing this removes the power and weight to the rear tire. That weight and power keeps the bike planted through the corner. At slow speed it really isn't a big deal. Once you start picking up the speed it won't end well. It unloads the rear suspension and takes traction away from the rear tire. This makes your contact patch smaller and more likely to lose overall traction.

Front brake will tend to stand you up or cause you to go wide in a corner. This really shouldn't be a concern on the street though. Don't push it on the street. Conditions are to variable and unknown. Rear brake will tighten your line. At your level don't use either. Get all your braking done BEFORE the corner. Better to go through to slow than to fast. Too much front brake through a turn can cause the front to wash out.

Again, get some real face to face training. That is what you really need.


Thanks for the insight, I applied the little I learned from the video and some of the input here. I definitely felt the difference in my cornering today. I do see the huge difference in slowing way down before the turn and keep my throttle smooth throughout it to keep me on my line. I have stopped holding the clutch in from what I learned and to slow down and not charge the corner.


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using your brake lever/pedal increases your chance of flipping haha. Let engine brake control your speed
Really? And how does this work on bikes that have a slipper-clutch?

:laugh:
 

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I sometimes hold the clutch in on tight right hand 90 degree turns in city riding like a single lane stop light or residential area because I hate how touchy the throttle can be at low speeds.. Sometimes I'll down shift before the turn an do it the right way but most of the time I get lazy an just pull the clutch in down shift ride through the turn and let the clutch out after..

Anyone else do this on low speed 90 degree turns or do you guys always downshift an throttle through?
 
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