Yamaha R3 Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
r3-forums.com Vendor
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,264 Posts
Nice writeup, as usual.

I ended up installing Spiegler lines (front and rear) for $129 from STG, came with free Brake fluid and spray Brake cleaner.

Used this little reusable $6 bleeder. Worked great. Magnet on the bottle lets you position it above the caliper so no air bubbles back flow. From Autozone.

bleed.jpg

That front line you installed with the screw-on connector is better for track use...
 

·
r3-forums.com Vendor
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nice writeup, as usual.

I ended up installing Spiegler lines (front and rear) for $129 from STG, came with free Brake fluid and spray Brake cleaner.

Used this little reusable $6 bleeder. Worked great. Magnet on the bottle lets you position it above the caliper so no air bubbles back flow. From Autozone.

View attachment 16618

That front line you installed with the screw-on connector is better for track use...
Better for track use? Why would you say that? It makes no difference whether you're on the track or not, stainless steel lines are better for all use. And the style that I used with the integrated fitting isn't designed specifically for track use, again, it's for all use, braking is braking, on or off the track.

That bleeder bottle will work fine, it's just a pain in the ass to pump a new line full of fluid with the brake lever like you have to with that bottle, that's why I mentioned the vacuum pump that I like to use which makes it much easier.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,264 Posts
Better for track use? Why would you say that? It makes no difference whether you're on the track or not, stainless steel lines are better for all use. And the style that I used with the integrated fitting isn't designed specifically for track use, again, it's for all use, braking is braking, on or off the track.

That bleeder bottle will work fine, it's just a pain in the ass to pump a new line full of fluid with the brake lever like you have to with that bottle, that's why I mentioned the vacuum pump that I like to use which makes it much easier.
When I was researching brake line replacement, I read a couple articles that said lines with integrated fittings are preferred by many track riders because of quicker/easier change out, that's all. I blame the Internet!

That bottle does take a fair amount of lever squeezing to get all the fluid through the line and air bled out on the front line (it was very quick on the rear line), but I was just trying to offer a much cheaper alternative for those on a tight budget and those who may only ever do this once.

I personally have one of the vacuum pumps, but as usual, I couldn't find it in the chaos that is currently my garage, so bought the bottle kit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
971 Posts
Front line bleed (at least in my case) went much faster once I figured out that the MC needs to be level or even tilted to the left to get that last bit of air out of the line (once I tilted to the left, a bubble popped up into the MC and life was again just grand).
 

·
r3-forums.com Vendor
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Yeah, I'm pretty sure I got that from you and tried it and it worked well, I just couldn't remember who it was, I just added a note giving you credit :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts

·
r3-forums.com Vendor
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
what is the black thing that you use to connect to the bleeder? i have standard bleeding kit like fangshui has.

how do you use the vacuum pump? did you show it in the step by step? reason is i have a tool i bought long ago, and it looks like a vacuum pump.
The "bleeder" fangshui posted is just a catch bottle with a hose, it's not a vacuum pump. The 2 styles I posted pictures of on the page are vacuum pumps.

One is a manual one (the one with the red X through it) that you squeeze a pump repeatedly to create a vacuum in the container. If you stop squeezing, the vacuum will likely leak out and you'll lose pressure.

The other (the one I recommend), connects to a compressed air line, and you squeeze the black trigger and hold it and compressed air flows through a venturi and creates vacuum continuously as long as you hold the trigger. This style is much easier to use to draw new fluid into a new empty brake line.

I don't use either style to bleed the brakes, I just use the pump as a catch bottle and use the lever method described on the bleed brakes page and in the video.

Does that clarify?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
The "bleeder" fangshui posted is just a catch bottle with a hose, it's not a vacuum pump. The 2 styles I posted pictures of on the page are vacuum pumps.

One is a manual one (the one with the red X through it) that you squeeze a pump repeatedly to create a vacuum in the container. If you stop squeezing, the vacuum will likely leak out and you'll lose pressure.

The other (the one I recommend), connects to a compressed air line, and you squeeze the black trigger and hold it and compressed air flows through a venturi and creates vacuum continuously as long as you hold the trigger. This style is much easier to use to draw new fluid into a new empty brake line.

I don't use either style to bleed the brakes, I just use the pump as a catch bottle and use the lever method described on the bleed brakes page and in the video.

Does that clarify?
ok i saw the first link and saw the manual vacuum pump which looked like one i have, guess it is of no use. and thanks for the explanation.
 

·
r3-forums.com Vendor
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ok i saw the first link and saw the manual vacuum pump which looked like one i have, guess it is of no use. and thanks for the explanation.
Sure thing. I had one of the manual ones for awhile too. If you have it already, they can certainly be used for filling the line with fluid the first time (still easier than not having it and trying to only use the lever), I just don't recommend buying one because the other style is better IMO.

I still use the lever for final bleeding either way.

When I had a manual one, the hose was very stiff and the container was constantly falling over, plus you have to use a bunch of grease to get it to seal properly to get any vacuum, and if it leaks at all, you end up losing vacuum and letting a bunch of air in the line. Then it broke so I did a little more research and bought the pneumatic style the next time and it's much easier to use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
To get a good seal at the bleeder end, I just put a small zip tie around the end of the hose. It works really well. In fact, I just leave the zip tie on the hose then.

The bottle falling over is really annoying though.

The vacuum bleeder is really nice for getting old brake fluid out and the refilling with fresh. I always empty the system every year and put fresh stuff in. This, of course, is overkill for a street machine. I am racing though so it is cheap insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
Done new SS Speigler lines installed today and New Motul RBF 600 dot 4 Racing. The front is much more responsive for sure. I followed Jesse's suggestions and it came out great and was really easy too do.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top