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Hello from Southern Illinois...

My name is Patrick, I am 54 years old, retiring from my position as a lead custodian with the local school district... living with my 21 year old daughter who is a university junior in a pre-med tech program. I am currently receiving retirement bonuses and refunds of previous the MSF course in 2008 on a new Buell 500 cc, which I kept for 3 seasons; then trading to a 2010 Honda Sh150i for 5 seasons.

I am now looking at the Honda, Kawasaki, and Yamaha 300 cc sport bikes... leaning toward the Ninja and YZF.

Joined forums for both models, and researching what my purchase will be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Cant seem to edit my post...

Meant to say... I am currently receiving retirement bonuses and refunds of previous retirement plans... I started riding legally following the MSF course in 2008...
 

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Hello from Southern Illinois...

My name is Patrick, I am 54 years old, retiring from my position as a lead custodian with the local school district... living with my 21 year old daughter who is a university junior in a pre-med tech program. I am currently receiving retirement bonuses and refunds of previous the MSF course in 2008 on a new Buell 500 cc, which I kept for 3 seasons; then trading to a 2010 Honda Sh150i for 5 seasons.

I am now looking at the Honda, Kawasaki, and Yamaha 300 cc sport bikes... leaning toward the Ninja and YZF.

Joined forums for both models, and researching what my purchase will be.
Welcome! I'll just say that for anyone over the age of 45-50 the ergonomics of the R3 will be MUCH kinder to your back and joints than the Ninja 300 will be. ;)

Just getting a leg over the N300 made me say "Oh, He!! no!".
 

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I personally liked the R3 better. My fiance liked the Ninja 300 more. Sit on both and/or do a test ride. Get what you like better.
 

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Strongly recommend the R3.... better riding position. Smooth engine....excellent fuel economy....softer suspension. Sit on both bikes and if you can test drive one....better...
 

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I really liked the R3 out of the smaller class bikes I shopped around for. I went with it because people really liked this bike and friends had bigger bikes were getting this bike. and have no regrets @ 49 years. Its a nimble light fun bike and everyday I ride it brings me such happiness going out and about. Ive done some upgrades and really enjoy working on the bike and making it my own.
 

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Strongly recommend the R3.... better riding position. Smooth engine....excellent fuel economy....softer suspension. Sit on both bikes and if you can test drive one....better...
+1.
 

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Definitely buy the Yamaha F3.
 

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How do you plan to ride? - which is more comfortable or suits your needs better? - hard to say, both are good platforms. First of all, welcome to the forum, but it is an R3 forum, so there's a pretty strong bias toward the Yam option here. If there was any way to test ride both, that's what I'd recommend.
 

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Nobody can choose for you. Go to the dealer and check out both bikes very carefully. See which one YOU like best. I prefer the R3 over the Ninja300. You should also look at the new Honda CBR500R. Good luck.
 

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The 2016 Honda CBR500R
New CBR 500R is very sexy. The headlight is a bit odd, but I love the aggressive body work. If you want the feel of a big bike then the CBR500R is the way to go.

Its a shame that Honda doesn't put more effort into things like the cluster. The cluster on the CB series is the same as the Grom. Its bland and looks like its from 2008, lol. Those are little things the R3 did right that set it apart for me.

I also think the CBR 500 is overpriced for what it is. Its power specs are almost identical to the R3 but its $1300 more and you don't get any of the fun bells and whistles, lol. At least they changed up the body work, it looks very sexy now.
 

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Hello from Southern Illinois...

My name is Patrick, I am 54 years old, retiring from my position as a lead custodian with the local school district... living with my 21 year old daughter who is a university junior in a pre-med tech program. I am currently receiving retirement bonuses and refunds of previous the MSF course in 2008 on a new Buell 500 cc, which I kept for 3 seasons; then trading to a 2010 Honda Sh150i for 5 seasons.

I am now looking at the Honda, Kawasaki, and Yamaha 300 cc sport bikes... leaning toward the Ninja and YZF.

Joined forums for both models, and researching what my purchase will be.
I have to agree with your assessment. I have always been a Honda & Yamaha guy, and my older borther was always a Suzuki GSXR guy (R.I.P. bro). I had a 1992 Yamaha FZR600 from 1995-2004, and a 2003 Honda CBR600RR from 2004-2015!

Now, I love Honda's, and they've made a nice bunch of light middleweight bikes-CB300F to the CBR300R to the CB500's. however, the CBR300R is a single cylinder. It is reliable, beautiful, and rides and handles well but just doesn't have the top end or quick juice to get out of bad situations.

If you want to get something just ready, kind of a "turn key" bike, you can look at the KTM RC390. It has a lot of advanced tech on such an affordable bike. If you're not going to spruce up your bike with aftermarket parts like a full exhaust, rear shock, fuel injection controller, etc, it is a bike to consider.

When I was looking myself, I considered the KTM, but it really came down to the Ninja 300 or R3. The Ninja 300 has a slipper clutch and in the beginning of 2015 when the R3's came out, the Ninja 300's could boast of having a huge aftermarket part segment to choose from. Outside, of having a KX125< i've never had another Kawasaki and considered them less reliable or more finicky machines. IN the past, their maintenance intervals were far shorter than other bikes, which was a negative to me. But the Ninja300 is a solid machine. You really can't go wrong.

Based on the DNA of the R1 and R6's success came the R3, and for its first 300 iteration, Yamaha hit the ball out of the park, which was a consensus among most reviewers be it bloggers or bike sites or magazines. The "experts" loved it from the get go. So I decided upon the R3 after lots of research and couldn't be happier. And a little under a year later after they finally shipped, there is a huge aftermarket parts segment for it. There is so much available already to trick it out to the point, its like a mini middleweight race bike.

Either way, you can't go wrong. I'd go with either the R3 or Ninja, but the RC390 deserves some consideration. However, if you do not plan on doing any maintenance and want a KTM dealer to do the maintenance for you, there are not as many KTM dealerships around, obviously.

My 2 cents.
 

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If you want to get something just ready, kind of a "turn key" bike, you can look at the KTM RC390. It has a lot of advanced tech on such an affordable bike. If you're not going to spruce up your bike with aftermarket parts like a full exhaust, rear shock, fuel injection controller, etc, it is a bike to consider.
Not sure if I agree with this. What would stop you from upgrading it with aftermarket like any other bike? Stock exhaust is still heavy, rear shock is non adjustable, and fuel controller could be thrown on just like any other bike.
 

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Not sure if I agree with this. What would stop you from upgrading it with aftermarket like any other bike? Stock exhaust is still heavy, rear shock is non adjustable, and fuel controller could be thrown on just like any other bike.
Ha, I KNEW you'd chime in. I am just saying, IMAO, the RC390 is more turn-key, [and has less aftermarket parts available for it] compared to others in its class and is perfectly fine and refined enough at stock to keep it as it is. Of course, you can upgrade and improve it, but for the novice/casual rider type who doesn't want to tinker and upgrade it, it is still very capable. That is all I am saying. They are very refined bikes for the money, all things being considered. Yes?
 
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