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Hey guys new rider here, glad to be a part of the community!

I've been doing a lot of riding lately, bought all my gear except for the pants, and some cold weather gloves which I plan on getting maybe in a week or two. Anyways I'm riding in pretty warm conditions lowest it will get is 35 but the wind is just killing my hands on my icon gloves at night. What do you guys do too combat the cold on your hands? Will latex gloves and the little chemical hand warmers be good until I buy some thicker gloves? Thanks!
 

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I rode year round in San Diego. Nice and warm but the mountains do get pretty cold in the winter. Cold enough to snow and ice up. Best I can suggest is wind proof underlayers. Dont worry so much about extra layers. A thin wind proof under will do more for you than a thick non windprooof one. Sure the thick one will warm you up, but once you get to speed, that wind goes right through and chills you. Freezeout makes a cheap windproof linder. They make glove liners, pant liners and balaclavas as well. I also have this thing, not sure what its called but looks like a beanie. Rather than one end open and the other shut like a normal beanie, both ends are open, so I can wear it around my neck.

I wouldnt spend the money now on winter gear, spring and summer are coming up. On the flip side to that, CG and a bunch of retailers may put their winter items on sale.
 

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I rode year round in San Diego. Nice and warm but the mountains do get pretty cold in the winter. Cold enough to snow and ice up. Best I can suggest is wind proof underlayers. Dont worry so much about extra layers. A thin wind proof under will do more for you than a thick non windprooof one. Sure the thick one will warm you up, but once you get to speed, that wind goes right through and chills you. Freezeout makes a cheap windproof linder. They make glove liners, pant liners and balaclavas as well. I also have this thing, not sure what its called but looks like a beanie. Rather than one end open and the other shut like a normal beanie, both ends are open, so I can wear it around my neck.

I wouldnt spend the money now on winter gear, spring and summer are coming up. On the flip side to that, CG and a bunch of retailers may put their winter items on sale.
Agreed. Windproof is the best thing. I rode a bit this winter on some 30º days in IL. I'd wear a sweater under my leather jacket and that cut the wind really well on my chest/arms. Windproof balaclava + helmet protected my head and neck. My hands and legs, however, were ALWAYS very cold after a ride because I didn't have anything wind[roof. Jeans, for instance (even with another player underneath, i.e. athletic shorts), are warm enough to handle the air and overall temp, but lack of wind proofing lets the wind cut right through you and chill you to the bone. I'd come in from my ride and literally feel cold emanating from my thighs for an hour after my ride b/c I was so thoroughly chilled, lol. Same on my hands, since my gloves were not at all suited for cold winter airflow.

A thin windproof layer under or over jeans will do wonders for you, as will proper winter riding gloves.
 

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In a few weeks it will be 100 degrees daily. Just go to sport chalet and get some $4 mountain climbing knit glove liners. They are tightly woven and dont snag. Cheap thin and warm.

Wear them inside your gloves when its cold.
 

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Like other said, windproof layer is big and biggest thing you will need.
I got cheap this winter and used rain gear as my windproof gear(spent on a brand new bike, repair, all leather gear, gloves...)
Works wonder so far and get me prepared for rain anytime(the rain must have followed me to California this year, rained the whole winter til now)
I got myself heated gloves and one of the best investment so far. The biggest problem of gloves are not that they are not weather proof. It's the fact that they are wet on the outside and after you get out of work 8-9hours later, the inside of the gloves gets wet! Once you hit the road with wet gloves are just freeze burn your fingers. Unless you plan on riding with two pair of gloves with rain, get a heated pair is not a bad idea(I still pull out heated gloves if it rains at 50s nowadays, just incase I need it for return trip)
 

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Heated grips,best thing since sliced bread.
 

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lowest it will get is 35 but the wind is just killing my hands on my icon gloves at night.
Did you mention where you live? I'm in Syracuse and it will be 28F on the way to work this morning. It can be 40F and raining in the mornings in June. The Icon Patrol is the best value in a foul weather glove.
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http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/icon-patrol-waterproof-gloves
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A thick pair of ski gloves would be warmer but make it hard to work the clutch lever.
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I'm a dedicated commuter so I also use a full set of plug in electrically heated clothing. Electric glove liners are more hassel to put on but much more effective that heated grips since they apply the heat all along the finger tips.
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http://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/venture-heat-12v-heated-glove-liners
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Meh, my BMW has heated grips and as nice as they are, if your body is cold it won't really help that much.

It was 41 this morning. I have a 30 minute ride to work that includes 20 minutes going 90 down a toll road. I just wear my mesh jacket with both liners (a waterproof and a warm liner) and a hoodie underneath. I wear Jeans and riding boots. I get a little chilly in my legs, but otherwise, not too bad. My BMW is much more aerdynamic, though, than the R3 is. The R3 I have to overly tuck to get out of the wind when I want to where the BMW I just kind of ride however I want.
 
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