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Anyone adding or added LED's yet? I have bought LED's and am ready to install but wondered if anyone had come up against any problems. My idea is to wire them in parallel in 4 locations and directly into the lighting wires but haven't looked at the location or colors of the wire to know where. Any wiring diagrams online yet?
On another note, just installed my Yoshimura genuine Yamaha slip-on and single seat conversion. Next is adjustable levers and license plate relocation/fender eliminator. Pics. soon.
 

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Anyone adding or added LED's yet? I have bought LED's and am ready to install but wondered if anyone had come up against any problems. My idea is to wire them in parallel in 4 locations and directly into the lighting wires but haven't looked at the location or colors of the wire to know where. Any wiring diagrams online yet?
On another note, just installed my Yoshimura genuine Yamaha slip-on and single seat conversion. Next is adjustable levers and license plate relocation/fender eliminator. Pics. soon.
FRONT: I'm doing the Halo-1 flush mount front signals from TST but they aren't available yet. They are LED and have an LED running light ring around the outside that you can get in different colors. The website says these are plug and play, so no worries with cutting and soldering, etc.

https://tstindustries.com/HALO-1-Flushmount-Signals-2015-R3.html

REAR: I have the Yamaha Europe OEM LED turn signals. Bought them on eBay from an Australian seller. Not installed yet, because I'm waiting for the Vagabond Motorsports tail tidy to get here next week, but there should be no issues as they are OEM parts for the R6 and R1 European models.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Yamaha-Genuine-LED-Indicators-Blinkers-MT-09-YZF-R1-R6-FZ6R-MT-07-Tenere-XT660-/301552312220?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_15&hash=item4635eb1f9c
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I like those, particularly the smoked!
 

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FRONT:
REAR: I have the Yamaha Europe OEM LED turn signals. Bought them on eBay from an Australian seller. Not installed yet, because I'm waiting for the Vagabond Motorsports tail tidy to get here next week, but there should be no issues as they are OEM parts for the R6 and R1 European models.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Yamaha-Genuine-LED-Indicators-Blinkers-MT-09-YZF-R1-R6-FZ6R-MT-07-Tenere-XT660-/301552312220?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_15&hash=item4635eb1f9c

Were the Yamaha Europe OEM LED turn signals plug and play or did you have to splice and solder the wires?
 

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Were the Yamaha Europe OEM LED turn signals plug and play or did you have to splice and solder the wires?
If you have the TST flush mount frontsignals AND their flasher relay installed, for the Yamaha LEDS you just have to either cut and solder OR crimp on the connectors that come with the kit. (No resistors needed this way).

I soldered because it's more secure.

If you are only installing the Yamaha LEDs then you have to add in the resistors that come with the kit to make them flash correctly. Same thing, solder or crimp connectors.
 

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I soldered because it's more secure.
With all due respect sir, that is incorrect.

A good quality crimped connector is far more secure than a soldered one. Solder is vulnerable to vibration brittleness. I'm an airplane mechanic, if the FAA ever caught you soldering anything you'd lose your license. You use crimp connectors on things vulnerable to vibrations. Solder is great for a CPU's motherboard, really bad for a wire.

There is a reason that you don't see solder in any of Yamahas factory connectors. It's all some form of crimp.

By all means, keep the solder away from the motorcycle. Your connections will thank you! :D
 

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With all due respect sir, that is incorrect.

A good quality crimped connector is far more secure than a soldered one. Solder is vulnerable to vibration brittleness. I'm an airplane mechanic, if the FAA ever caught you soldering anything you'd lose your license. You use crimp connectors on things vulnerable to vibrations. Solder is great for a CPU's motherboard, really bad for a wire.

There is a reason that you don't see solder in any of Yamahas factory connectors. It's all some form of crimp.

By all means, keep the solder away from the motorcycle. Your connections will thank you! :D
I can only go by my personal experience. I've been soldering connections on motorcycles for over 45 years (100's of soldered connections on more than 50 different bikes, too) and have never had a soldered connection crack, fail, short out or come loose. After soldering I coat the connection with liquid plastic AND use heat shrink tubing over the whole thing.

I HAVE had crimped connectors come loose several times over the years, even a couple factory crimped connections! And yes, I DO have a high quality crimping tool (bought from Boeing's Surplus Store) and know how to use it correctly.

I'll stick with soldering, mate!
 

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That's because you don't know how to crimp a connector. A GOOD quality crimp connector done properly will be 10 times stronger than the same connector soldered.

Vibration can cause a connection to come loose. Just because YOU haven't had it happen doesn't mean it's a good idea. If it was so good, the FAA wouldn't have banned it for use in aircraft wiring. VW wouldn't recommend AGAINST it's use in wiring harnesses and the boating industry wouldn't be against it.

But keep on going man. You know it all. That's obvious. You must already know that when you solder a wire you degrade the insulation and cause it to begin to corrode at that location. And I HAVE seen many soldered connections come loose due to vibration, usually on lawnmowers with home made repairs. 5 crimp connections and one soldered one and which one came apart? If solder was so good, why isn't it all over the place on the bike? Why is everything crimp? The entire wiring harness crimped? Hmm? Got an answer to that one, big fellah?
 

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That's because you don't know how to crimp a connector. A GOOD quality crimp connector done properly will be 10 times stronger than the same connector soldered.

Vibration can cause a connection to come loose. Just because YOU haven't had it happen doesn't mean it's a good idea. If it was so good, the FAA wouldn't have banned it for use in aircraft wiring.
Sorry, but I DO know how to crimp a connector and anyway, an R3 isn't a plane, doesn't have anywhere even remotely near the levels of vibration a plane does and doesn't have the potential to fall out of the sky if a vital connector disconnects.

I'm sure what you are saying, and what Redstone College/Embry Riddle/Etc. teaches, is true for planes, but: Plane and R3 = apples and oranges.

Plus, I don't solder wires to connectors. I solder wires directly to each other. No connectors. I don't mean for them to be disconnected, ever. They're not going to come apart unless I cut them.

My soldered, sealed and heat shrunk (using hot melt glue lined heat shrink tubing) wire connections do not fail. Period. I was shown this method by a certified motorcycle mechanic and I've been doing them this way for myself and for friends for 45+ years; that's a LONG F****** time with ZERO failures!

And that's only on motorcycles. I've also done 100's on cars and even some on boats. Again, ZERO failures.

So, why so many crimps on a motorcycle, car etc.? They build to a price point and soldering is time consuming, so costs money. And, they mean for easy exchange of parts if one fails. Hence, crimping.

End of discussion....
 

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Crimping is a better connector. If it's good enough for a 50 million dollar jet, it's good enough for a motorcycle. And yes, motorcycles vibrate far more than airplanes. What experience do you have with aircraft? Are you a pilot? Mechanic? No? No? Well, I'm both. Just because you've done it without issues doesn't mean its a recommended method. I could play russian roulette 100 times and never blow my head off. Does that mean it's a good thing? No. Well, soldering connections is basically playing russian roulette with your bike. And should it short out against the chassis and burn up some expensive equipment including burning out the ECU and causing engine failure at a less than opprotune time, it could be with your life.

I've worked on Airbus engines which are about 5 million dollars a piece, have you? You ever signed your name on the dotted line putting a 250 passenger jet back into commission? Didn't think so.

End of discussion alright. Game, set, match.
 

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A crimp can be a better connector when using the right crimp with the right tool. The 2 big reasons that GOOD crimps are preferred in the industry over solder is 1. vibration resistant and 2. faster installation.

Now this doesn't mean crimping is the only way to go and that everything else is bad and if you use anything else you will die. Most people have cheap 15$ crimp tools that honestly don't even do half a good job compared to a good solder joint. If you want a good crimp you need at least a ratchet crimp tool and even that doesn't compare to the pneumatic tools used in the industry.

When working on your own bike or car at home, with the tools most commonly found, you will not find any difference between a crimped wire and a soldered one. A shitty crimp using a cheap tool and low quality crimps will fail just as fast as a bad solder job where a cheap soldering iron and crappy solder is used with a bad technique. As long as the wire is properly heated and the solder is allowed to flow through the strands and not just coat and in the end the whole job isolated, the soldered connection will last.

Oh and even if the connection fails and shorts out, it will blow the signaling fuse. The turn signals do not share wiring with the ECU...
 

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Were the Yamaha Europe OEM LED turn signals plug and play or did you have to splice and solder the wires?
They are not plug and play but are not splice either if you have the adapter that you can get from ebay for $3. They have the universal bullet plugs on them just like most other aftermarket turn signals.

So, the Yamaha LEDs plus the adapter = plug and play. Which is what I did and feel that I made the right choice
 

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It's not a wonderful idea, but if you have lights that dont have a connector that fits then you can cut the factory connector off and crimp it on to the new light, that makes the new light plug and pray.
 

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FRONT: I'm doing the Halo-1 flush mount front signals from TST but they aren't available yet. They are LED and have an LED running light ring around the outside that you can get in different colors. The website says these are plug and play, so no worries with cutting and soldering, etc.

https://tstindustries.com/HALO-1-Flushmount-Signals-2015-R3.html

REAR: I have the Yamaha Europe OEM LED turn signals. Bought them on eBay from an Australian seller. Not installed yet, because I'm waiting for the Vagabond Motorsports tail tidy to get here next week, but there should be no issues as they are OEM parts for the R6 and R1 European models.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Yamaha-Genuine-LED-Indicators-Blinkers-MT-09-YZF-R1-R6-FZ6R-MT-07-Tenere-XT660-/301552312220?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_15&hash=item4635eb1f9c
I plan to get the same Halo-1 flush mounts. I reached out to the manufacturer earlier this morning and the release date was pushed back to early 2016. :crying:
 

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I plan to get the same Halo-1 flush mounts. I reached out to the manufacturer earlier this morning and the release date was pushed back to early 2016. :crying:
Same answer I just got days ago. I was checking there daily, I feel dumb for hovering over that so long thinking they were going to pop up for sale.
 
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