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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just installed pirelli rosso II front and back. A great improvement over the stock tires.

I've only put on 5500 kilometers on my r3 ( first Street bike) but I love how this thing takes corners.

However I can't drag my knee off the ground which is a feeling I really want to experience. Any tips on cornering? I'm pretty much maxed out on leaning my bike over ( see photo)


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I can guarantee you that you're not even close to being maxed out on lean angle. What makes you think that? These bike will go a good 56-57 degrees of lean for sure, as long as you don't have the stock pegs.

My advice would be to do some track days. Dragging knees will come natural with higher corner speed but I can tell you it's nothing amazing. And pucks cost money lol Usually when I go into a turn and my knee touches the ground, I immediately lift the knee up a bit and then lean some more.

Don't force yourself to drag a knee. Many novices tend to do that because they think it's cool and they get into bad habits of poor body positioning. I've seen awkward looking people on bikes trying way too hard to drag a knee.
 
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You are at the edge of your tire, but can't drag knee? Sounds like BP problems. On the flip side just because you are dragging knee doesn't mean your BP is correct, as some people will really hang off trying to "reach" for the ground. That could make your BP worse. Already discussed but having chicken strips on a road bike means nothing. I posted a few pics here a few days ago of my first track day in japan. Some one even mentioned my big old chicken strips. That pic was of my bike before the day even started. After the first lap, and this was just a super slow familiarization lap, no faster than 50kph maybe, my tires were at the edge already.

No doubt dragging knee is fun the first few times but then it gets old. I practiced in an enclosed lot on base, where we hold the MSF courses. I went around the big circle over and over till I found my fastest comfortable speed and worked on hanging off the bike. I learned to drag knee on an R3 with stock tires doing like ~24 mph lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You are at the edge of your tire, but can't drag knee? Sounds like BP problems. On the flip side just because you are dragging knee doesn't mean your BP is correct, as some people will really hang off trying to "reach" for the ground. That could make your BP worse. Already discussed but having chicken strips on a road bike means nothing. I posted a few pics here a few days ago of my first track day. Some one even mentioned my big old chicken strips. That pic was of my bike before the day even started. After the first lap, and this was just a super slow familiarization lap, no faster than 50kph maybe, my tires were at the edge already.

No doubt dragging knee is fun the first few times but then it gets old. I practiced in an enclosed lot on base, where we hold the MSF courses. I went around the big circle over and over till I found my fastest comfortable speed and worked on hanging off the bike. I learned to drag knee on an R3 with stock tires doing like ~24 mph lol.
Wow 24, and i thought maybe faster corners would make a difference. I'm sure poor body positioning is a major factor. I try to just be comfortable but in reality probably make some poor decisions.

Apart from training on a track, do you have any tips for learning? Perhaps watch twist of the wrist a few more times.

I know track is the best solution. I'm hoping to this year, I just live so far from any tracks and to get the training to ride a near track I'm looking at nearly $1500 (Canadian) before they'll let me go out and ride. Have to take training first

Thanks for the input!

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Wow 24, and i thought maybe faster corners would make a difference. I'm sure poor body positioning is a major factor. I try to just be comfortable but in reality probably make some poor decisions.

Apart from training on a track, do you have any tips for learning? Perhaps watch twist of the wrist a few more times.

I know track is the best solution. I'm hoping to this year, I just live so far from any tracks and to get the training to ride a near track I'm looking at nearly $1500 (Canadian) before they'll let me go out and ride. Have to take training first

Thanks for the input!

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It's very very easy to drag knee going fast on a track. It's a bit more difficult, at least for me, to do so going slow. The reason I did it slow was because the closed off course I was using is small and you aren't able to go too fast in a circle on it.

Twist of the wrist is a great video to watch a few times. A lot of times even. There are racers I m ow who still use it to refresh/learn things in the video and book.

Some
People spend thousands of dollars going to schools like CSS and I've never heard anyone having a negative experience.

Already mentioned above, but dragging knee will come naturally, it's at this point where XYZ speed and 123 lean angle combine and your BP is correct and it just kind of happens, unless you are exaggerating it and "reaching" for it. But even if you are reaching for it, once it happens, now you know you can do it and not crash, that confidence would probably help it come more naturally in the future.

Th bike is really light and if you really want to practice dragging knee, find a big enough clean, flat and open parking lot and start doing circles or figure 8's. Make sure you have a suite on lol.

When I lived in San Diego the track I went to was 5.5 hours away. It's worth the trip man, do it!

Here some low speed knee dragging fun. What M13 mentions in the video is petty good too:

https://youtu.be/GKDN3okg4ko
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's very very easy to drag knee going fast on a track. It's a bit more difficult, at least for me, to do so going slow. The reason I did it slow was because the closed off course I was using is small and you aren't able to go too fast in a circle on it.

Twist of the wrist is a great video to watch a few times. A lot of times even. There are racers I m ow who still use it to refresh/learn things in the video and book.

Some
People spend thousands of dollars going to schools like CSS and I've never heard anyone having a negative experience.

Already mentioned above, but dragging knee will come naturally, it's at this point where XYZ speed and 123 lean angle combine and your BP is correct and it just kind of happens, unless you are exaggerating it and "reaching" for it. But even if you are reaching for it, once it happens, now you know you can do it and not crash, that confidence would probably help it come more naturally in the future.

Th bike is really light and if you really want to practice dragging knee, find a big enough clean, flat and open parking lot and start doing circles or figure 8's. Make sure you have a suite on lol.

When I lived in San Diego the track I went to was 5.5 hours away. It's worth the trip man, do it!

Here some low speed knee dragging fun. What M13 mentions in the video is petty good too:

https://youtu.be/GKDN3okg4ko
That video was amazing. I took some things you said and did some reading on cornering and set out to practice. Though I'm clearly reaching but still not drastically hanging off, I did reach the ground ever so briefly.

I also scuffed up my pegs pretty good. Knowing now that it is achievable I'll focus more on form.

I noticed a few major contributors.. Heel tucked in tight against guard, front of my body low, peeking off to side of bike and most importantly I think chin up.

When I focused on where I was going and not what I was doing per say, it came much easier.

I'll focus more on proper form than trying to get low. I'll need some form of lower protection because I chewed my pants a little

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That video was amazing. I took some things you said and did some reading on cornering and set out to practice. Though I'm clearly reaching but still not drastically hanging off, I did reach the ground ever so briefly.

I also scuffed up my pegs pretty good. Knowing now that it is achievable I'll focus more on form.

I noticed a few major contributors.. Heel tucked in tight against guard, front of my body low, peeking off to side of bike and most importantly I think chin up.

When I focused on where I was going and not what I was doing per say, it came much easier.

I'll focus more on proper form than trying to get low. I'll need some form of lower protection because I chewed my pants a little

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Some terms I've heard from MSF instructors are "COW" or chin over wrist, "kiss the mirror", "forward and in" and basically those are trying to get your upper body forward and to the inside of the bike. I've been told by a control rider at a trackday to just slightly move my butt cheek off to the inside, then rotate my upper body, if that makes sense.

I've been to 4 MSF classes now and you will always hear "look through the turn/look where you want to go" which may be hard to do at times. You might feel you are coming in too hot and you won't make it. You panic, you brake, you target fixate on what you are about to hit but don't want to hit. Then you crash. Trust your training, not your instincts. Think of it this way, there is a better rider than you on that track right now and he is coming in much faster than you, he is leaned over much further, he is hanging off much more, and he makes the turn. Why? Because he trusted that the bike would hold its line through the corner if he followed his training. He did what he was supposed to, he stayed on the bike and he made the corner.

I can drag knee all day and I feel I am no where near the peg feelers. Stock rearsets. I feel really comfortable hanging off a bike. Hanging off allows it to straighten up more, allowing for more clearance.

All that being said:
Be carful.
Take what I said as just my opinion, I am not an instructor.
 

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Wow 24, and i thought maybe faster corners would make a difference. I'm sure poor body positioning is a major factor. I try to just be comfortable but in reality probably make some poor decisions.

Apart from training on a track, do you have any tips for learning? Perhaps watch twist of the wrist a few more times.

I know track is the best solution. I'm hoping to this year, I just live so far from any tracks and to get the training to ride a near track I'm looking at nearly $1500 (Canadian) before they'll let me go out and ride. Have to take training first

Thanks for the input!

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Where are you located at? I don't see why you'd have to spend $1500. Most track days cost around $150-200 for a day. My local organization charges an extra $50 if it's your first time because you need to do the school (which is just in the morning). 1500 seems pretty outrageous.
 
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Isn't $1500 in the CSS/riding school territory of prices? That is pretty high. I also paid $150 for track days in San Diego. Here it's pay per session. If you are paying that kind of money it better be CSS or some other actual trackday school.
 

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Isn't $1500 in the CSS/riding school territory of prices? That is pretty high. I also paid $150 for track days in San Diego. Here it's pay per session. If you are paying that kind of money it better be CSS or some other actual trackday school.
Yeah $1500 is roughly the cost of CSS, but he wasn't talking about that. He never mentioned CSS. He doesn't have to start with that. He can just do a regular track day. All organizations have some sort of schooling and instructors for novices.
 
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Yeah $1500 is roughly the cost of CSS, but he wasn't talking about that. He never mentioned CSS. He doesn't have to start with that. He can just do a regular track day. All organizations have some sort of schooling and instructors for novices.
Oh I know that, was just putting it or there that if he is spending that kind of cash, for a track day, I would be looking at an actual school.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Where are you located at? I don't see why you'd have to spend $1500. Most track days cost around $150-200 for a day. My local organization charges an extra $50 if it's your first time because you need to do the school (which is just in the morning). 1500 seems pretty outrageous.
Ontario, Canada. If you can point me in the right direction I'm all game.

I really want to spend some time learning in a proper environment

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm doing more research and you are likely right. where I was looking was a course. I was just confused by what I was reading. I thought it was necessary to take before you could go ride tracks.

It still sounds like s sound Investment, but I'm going to call some places and see what the process is to get in and ride

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There are actual schools you can go to like CSS or the Yamaha motorcycle racing champions school or what ever it's called. They can run in the thousands but as mentioned I have never heard any negative feedback on those schools. For people who don't have that money, track days are where it's at. At the very least you meet some great people in the pits, a few racers maybe and most will give pointers, show you the race lines or even follow and critique you. My particular org had awesome control riders who I believe really want to see their customers grow. They offer free classes/tips to the beginner riders but welcome the experienced folks as well. So, that is why I am so into track days, the info is so worth it
 

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Ontario, Canada. If you can point me in the right direction I'm all game.

I really want to spend some time learning in a proper environment

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Well I can't say I'm familiar with the tracks in Canada and the track day organizations, but I'm pretty sure there are a couple of tracks in your area then. I know of others on the zx6r forum that are in Ontario and they've posted about tracks around there. Just do some googling and I'm sure you'll find a lot more info. Nobody ever complained about the price either, so I'm sure it's very similar to the way they're ran here in the US.
 
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