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Reading online you find NUMEROUS articles relating to cleaning and lubing your chain. use this product. Not that product. MotoLube, Engine oil, ChainLube,etc and my personal favorite which seems to be the biggest culprit of debate...WD-40. (not saying I use WD-40. Just like hearing the people who love it and others who hate it.)

So what do you use?

How often do you clean and lube your chain?

What tools do you use for your process? ie: girlfriends toothbrush, chain brush, shop rags, moms dish towels, sisters makeup sponge... etc..
 
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First I don't lube my chain by putting the bike on a rear stand for safety reasons. You wouldn't want to get your fingers between a moving chain and sprocket. I lube one part of the chain with the bike on the side stand and move the bike forward. The R3 chain is easy to lube because you can get to a long section of chain with each bike move. I only had to move the bike 2 times to get around the chain. I mark where I start with a sharpie so I know when I've been all the way around. I use the Liquid Wrench chain lube from Walmart at about $4 a can as I recall. What I do is use the spray as both a cleaner and lube. If the chain was really dirty like it was today, I wash the chain with a garden hose, ride a bit to dry it, dry it completely with my MetroVac, then lube it. I get down on my knees and hold a microfiber cloth (to catch the oil that drips) under the chain starting at the front of the rear sprocket and spray as I move the cloth forward to catch the extra. This also cleans off any dirt. I then take a paper towel and dry as much excess oil off as I can. I also use that paper towel to go over the rear sprocket and clean it. Then I move the bike forward and repeat. I put a paper towel on each grip..actually they are napkins I confiscate from Subway, McDonalds, etc... and secure with rubber bands so I can move the bike forward for the next section of the chain without getting oil from my hands onto the hand grips. Takes about 5 min. I'll do this every 300 miles or so. The manual makes quite a deal about drying the chain if you get it wet to prevent rust, so it may not be the best chain around. When I'm done I clean my hands with orange Goop. Be careful not to spray oil on your tires or they can get slippery.
 

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Wd40 is very thin, and doesn't stay well in the chain.
the stock chain comes with either chain wax, or grease.
WD40 dissolves this, so it's a no-go for me.
On the other hand, products like lithium grease, and chain wax, often are diluted in some similar product, so spraying them on the chain will get the old stuff out.

I used lithium grease, until one day the can just evaporated all pressure inside.
then I went with chain wax, also a spray bottle.
It works great, and stays longer on the chain.

You really want to find something heavy like wax or grease, not light like oil. The lighter the product the less effective it becomes, and sometimes the more it attracts dirt.
 

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Great Stuff, the T-9 developed by Boeing...stay on, and prevents corrosion. A little pricey, but in this instance, you do get what you pay for.

http://boeshield.com/
+1 from me for the T-9 Boeshield. They recommend it for the following:

For motorcycle use:
Cables
Lever Pivots
Battery Terminals
Electrical Circuits
Rusty Bolts
O-Ring Chains
Spoke Nipples
Aluminum Rims, Uncoated

It's available in a 4 oz. spray can for $9.95 w/free shipping on eBay (U.S.)
 

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Maxima for me.

The blue can cleans the chain with absolutely no work and the yellow can is the wax.

I apply the stuff from the blue can on a cold chain and let it sit for 3-4 minutes and then wash it off with a medium stream of water. (It will not damage o-rings, aluminum, wheels or anything else that I know of.) When you see the crap and crud come off the chain it is amazing.

I then use my leaf blower to dry the chain off. My bike is on the spooled stand so I run it in first gear at idle. Yes, you can amputate your fingers doing this IF YOU PUT YOUR FINGERS NEAR THE CHAIN! I just point the blower at the chain and dry it for 2-3 minutes.

Then I wait for about an hour, preferably with the bike sitting in the sun, to finalize the drying, and then I hit it with the yellow can. In the picture below you can see my template for blocking off the chain area so I don't get overspray. The template goes onto the chain vertically from the rear. The right side is folded back to catch overspray to the wheel. I just aim the yellow can at the chain from 2-3 inches away and go through 3-4 rotations of the chain. You can see the overspray in the picture below. If you hold the can the right distance from the sprocket/chain, you get very little overspray and you waste a lot less of the wax. Even though you are spraying the wax at the "outside" of the chain, the wax "migrates" fully around the links and pins.

This product needs to sit for awhile to dry. I let it sit overnight. It is non-sticky and does not attract dirt. It does not fling. Almost all motorcycle shops carry it. I get it through Amazon Prime, or if I need a few more $ at Revzilla to get bonus bucks I add a can to my order.

The chain when clean rattles a lot. Once the wax is put on the system is so quiet I can rotate the wheel and easily hear the dynabeads in the tire sloshing around.

Because the product is designed as a "system", once you have the wax on the chain the next cleaning is much easier.

PS - Disclaimer: I do not work for Maxima. If someone who works for Maxima reads this please send me some free cans!
 

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SAFETY DISCLAIMER: I only run the bike in gear (idle) during the drying process. If you are easily confused by things that are mechanical or if you are clumbsy by nature or have vertigo, please do not do attempt this stunt. This is intended to be done by a professional rider on a closed circuit course. Objects in the mirror are closer than they appear. Do not eat the chain wax. It gives you diarrhea. Contents may settle during shipping. Stay alert and stay alive.
 

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T-9 Boeshield sounds like something I gotta try.
 

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HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!! Grease Ninja HAHAHAHAHAHA!!!! $15 HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!

Its not even a $1 worth of plastic. The copper tube is the most expensive part.
You don't even need the copper tube either, a couple of zip ties would work just fine and be way cheaper.
After looking at pics of the bottom of it, I can totally make this at work for free. CNC Machinist!!! **** you could even make this on a drill press with very little effort and save $15.
 

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Don't forget to periodically remove the guard from the front sproket and clean all the gunk that accumulates there too.
 

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Dry. Now and then a wipe with WD40 to chase rust from salty roads.

O ring chains have sealed grease in them. Chain lube holds dirt and grit and creates a grinding paste. The only thing you can really lube is the point of contact between the chain roller and the sprocket, and that gets removed relatively quickly from the pressure on it.

12,000-22,000 street miles with steel sprockets, O or X ring chains and as little as possible done to them.

My off road bikes get the same. There a drive set can last just a single day or half a season. Lube just makes a **** mess.

I lived thru the era of non sealed chains. Cleaning them in gas, then soaking them in motor oil. Count your blessings and save your $. My $0.02.
 

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Motorcycle Consumer News (Dec. 2012) issue had a great article about chain and sprocket maintenance. Here's what the article had to say about chain lube:

"We’re not sure expensive chain lubes do much more than plain old WD-40 or silicon-based lubricants when it comes to Oring chain maintenance. Use a dedicated chain lube if you’ll be riding through dust or rain. For less extreme conditions, cheaper general-purpose products may serve just fine, and sling less mess onto your rear wheel. The white grease on your new chain should be wiped off before use; it’ll quickly fling off the chain and what remains will catch and hold debris. Use a chain-specific cleaner or WD-40. Subsequent cleanings may require brushing to remove grunge from the chain’s myriad cracks and crevices, and the aptly named “Grunge Brush” works well (see Innovation of the Month, January 2011). Never use a wire brush on O-ring chains, as it can damage the O-rings. Lubing a chain is something best done while spinning the rear wheel by hand with the bike on its centerstand or supported by a work stand. Aim the spray can’s straw downward onto the sideplates, both inboard and outboard, on the lower rung. Spin the
wheel a few extra revolutions to work in the lube. Ideally, chains should be lubed at operating temperature; at the end of a ride, not the start, and the lube allowed to set-up (giving time for the lube’s thinning solvents to evaporate) before riding again."
 

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Thinner oils like wd40 don't stay long enough in the chain.
besides, the chain needs thicker products, like wax or grease.
wd40 does not lubricate enough, because it's too thin.

The higher the force, the thicker the grease needs to be.

An engine needs oil, because it generally has high movement, low forces (and in need of high coolant).
A transmission needs oil for low movement, high forces, and low coolant.
that's why an engine gets 10w30, and a transmission gets 80w120 oil.

A chain has very low movement, and the contact points are very small (pins), thus has extremely high forces worked on it, and needs very low cooling, as the travel distance through the air from front to back, or reverse, is enough to cool it, thus needs a thick lubrication substance.

Aside from wax providing superior lubrication for a chain, it also is dust repellent, compared to wd40 is dust collecting.
Silicon and carbon (as in sand and exhaust) are chain killers.
Silicon does not equal silicone!
silicon is sand or quartz, and in this case can be dust from rocks or stones; and silicone is an oil based gel with nothing of the hardness of silicon.
Some of the dust collected is harder than steel, and causes excessive wear on the links.

WD40 collects all that on your chain.

Iso wax spray cans have the wax (usually lithium wax or grease) mixed in a thin oil, that washes away dirt, and at the same time leaves a light trail of wax on the chain.
the oil also helps getting the wax between the o-rings.

I use chain wax, and only need to wax the chain once every 2 months.
Wax, when dry, feels like plastic, isn't sticky, but when rubbed between two surfaces, feels more like hard butter.

my bike is outside in extreme temperatures, unprotected, 90+ degrees sun, and rain.
people who leave their bikes inside, should wax their chains every 3k to 5000 miles.
 

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The contact point is a roller and sprocket tooth, not the ring (o or x) sealed greased pins inside them. Chain wax all over the side plates does nothing but deter rust, which is nice and once in awhile a wipe of any oil will do the same. Oil in your wax spray getting thru the rings on your chain means the heated grease will be getting out in use. It's your $.

Chains and sprockets are consumables, like tires and brake pads.

Dust repellant? Have you ridden off road with a waxed chain? Lol!
 

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The product I use feels dry, and my chain stays relatively dust free.
I didn't have that with other lubes like grease or oil. On those bikes, my chain would appear black, from all the debris it collected.

The R3 isn't an offroad bike anyway...
 

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No but dirt and debri are present in both environments. Both will stick to a waxed chain when it gets hot.

Do what you like, to me it's a waste of $ to put lube on the outside parts of a chain that has its moving parts sealed in lubricant. Been dealing with drive chains since around 1978. Today's sealed ring chains basically need nothing besides a wipe with cleaner and rust prohibiter if used in rain and salt in winter, which mine see regularly.
 
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